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What would be a good job to get before becoming a LEO?

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  • What would be a good job to get before becoming a LEO?

    I am moving to ND next month and will start school in the spring. What kind of jobs are there that are in some way related to LE? Something to get my foot in the door and start associating with LE type people. I guess I just cant think of anything at the moment that I could apply for? Any ideas?
    Yes, yes I am sure you NEED that new car. Don't be a financial moron.

  • #2
    I'm not an LEO, but I think having a stable job, that you do well is more important than what the job actually involves. (Providing it's legal, of coarse)
    A true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.

    -GK Chesterton

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    • #3
      If your over 18, I'd suggest dispatcher or jailer.
      You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Centurion44
        If your over 18, I'd suggest dispatcher or jailer.
        I am 23. Is a jailer the same thing as a corrections officer? Because if it is then ND wants someone with 3 years experience in LE. I thought about applying for a dispatcher position but they have none open at the moment.
        Any other ideas?
        Yes, yes I am sure you NEED that new car. Don't be a financial moron.

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        • #5
          Convenience store clerk (midnight shift)
          If you won't stand behind our troops, PLEASE, feel free to stand in front of them.

          If you won't get an *** whoopin' with me, you're gonna get one from me---stolen

          www.sportbikes.net

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          • #6
            Originally posted by KingB
            I am 23. Is a jailer the same thing as a corrections officer?
            No. A CO works in a prison. Guess where the jailer works. If your local Sheriff's dept is hiring you can check with them. Some Sheriff's Depts allow you to be hired as a jailer at 18 (not all, mine didn't, but I went to jailers school with a few 18 and 19 year olds from other agencies).

            Failing that, I'd suggest dispatcher. Especially if it's for an agency that you want to work for. That way you'll know the codes and you'll learn what goes on in the dispatch office.

            Both jobs have the potential to give you tons of experience that will help you if you ever become a police officer.
            You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

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            • #7
              professional babysitter or sheepherder
              Guns don't kill people. Chuck Norris kills People.

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              • #8
                So then do they only hire laterals and out of staters. How else would you get 3 years experience in LE if you can't work in LE

                Originally posted by KingB
                I am 23. Is a jailer the same thing as a corrections officer? Because if it is then ND wants someone with 3 years experience in LE. I thought about applying for a dispatcher position but they have none open at the moment.
                Any other ideas?
                "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

                For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

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                • #9
                  security maybe?

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                  • #10
                    I'm a Deputy Sheriff in North Dakota. Dispatcher or jailer is good. But if your in the Fargo Area try ASP Security. They patrol the Mall, do street dances, wedding dances and other events that the PD or SO don't want to do or have time to do.

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                    • #11
                      Is a Jailer and CO the same. Yes in ND they are. Men/women who work the jails tend to get upset if you call them jailers. Correctional Officer is the correct name for them.

                      Been told off once or twice for calling them jailer

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                      • #12
                        I have a friend that was an office b!tch for the local pd. that got his foot in the door, they paid for his schooling and he now works for them.
                        I don't know your name, I don't live on your street, but I'll help save your life.

                        If it's wet, sticky, and not yours DON'T TOUCH IT!

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                        • #13
                          Yup, I'll put my 2 cents worth in and say "dispatcher." I can't speak for the jailer side, but I can tell you that if you cut your teeth in dispatch (assuming you are the kind of person who could do the job), you will gain a lot of insight to use out on the road. I know there are a lot of cops who think it's pretty darned easy to be a dispatcher, but they only have it half right. It's easier to be a crappy dispatcher, but it is indeed quite a challenge and an honor to be a great one.

                          I know many a cop who started out in dispatch, and there are a few advantages that they bring with them. First, they understand the subtleties of their local law enforcement data base (for us it's LEDS, California is CLETS, etc) and NCIC. You understand how these things have to be run, so it gives you insight when dealing with running difficult names. If you are a digger, you can help direct a less experienced dispatcher on how to tweak things to dig a little deeper and find that needle in the haystack (providing he/she isn't swamped with priority calls, that is). If you end up having an MCT, you will be able to do more in-depth digging than the average patrol who isn't comfortable with computers.

                          That aside, you also will understand how to be more effective in dealing with dispatch. For us, our biggest problem in relating to our troops is the radio system. If it's not our repeaters or microwave problems, it's crappy portables going dead or simply that the officer (or dispatcher) hasn't learned to hold down the mic a second before transmitting. All these things come up and can cause great distress in a working relationship, so the advantage from seeing it from the side of a dispatcher is that you can come at it from both angles and perhaps eliminate a little bit of the miscommunication when you hit the road.

                          You would also learn that dispatchers are not the enemies. I know there are some truly lousy comm centers out there. But no one thinks *their* comm center is a problem. The one thing I think most share in common is that we want to be there for our officers and be of service. Yeah, there are some that are there to avoid as much work as possible. You will find that is sometimes true of both dispatchers as well as cops. But if you align yourself with the top performers and try to emulate their qualities, you will go farther in bridging relations - even if only for yourself. That can work wonders for you down the road when you need something special and you have a friend there you can always call to come to your aid.

                          Another thing you can glean from being a dispatcher is multi-tasking. Cops don't generally have to do it as much as dispatchers because they deal with the physical limitations of only being able to be in one place at one time. But in dispatch you frequently have to carry on 3 different lines of conversation at the same time all the while keeping your CAD updated and entering info accurately. How is this helpful out on the road? Well, from my selfish perspective I think it's great when an officer "gets" why I may be slightly delayed with his/her return. But on a bigger scale, there are those times when you send an officer to one call only to have things snowball where they are required to handle several different types of calls at once in one spot. It's overwhelming because of the physical limitations, but I know that some officers are better at coping with these circumstances than some others. Maybe they are better able to convey to dispatch what it is they need for assistance, or maybe it is that they are able to more effectively prioritize what is going on. Not that I don't think our cops are able to rise to these challenges on a frequent basis anyway, but I do think some do it better than others. Anything that can help hone your skills will give you an advantage down the road. Kind of like my time working as a medical transcriptionist. Not as fun, not as exciting and not as challenging a job as a dispatcher, but it gave me some listening and typing skills that enabled me to become a mean, lean CAD Queen. The faster and more accurate I am on CAD and with listening, the more energy I can put into the more difficult challengest of my job. It ends up being like a blink. You just do it - you don't think about it.

                          Sorry for the book.

                          Dina















                          ~~~~~~~~
                          Sleep is a poor substitute for caffeine
                          ~~~~~~~~


                          . s
                          c(__)


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                          • #14
                            My local department just hired a stay-at-home mother of ten years, so I don't think you should aim so much for a particular type of employment as your should for applicable experience. Being able to prove your adaptability and communication skills is your true foot-in-the-door.

                            In the meantime, however, I do recommend some level of security or human services work. I work as a security officer in a community correctional facility (read: halfway house, shelter), and I go through co-workers constantly as they are quite often accepted into LE positions.

                            However, getting into a "serious" security position may also take a significant level of experience and training. My facility, for example, will not accept officers within our own company if they do not have prior experience in human services, medical services, or related security positions. Meanwhile, hospitals in our area require officers to complete psychological exams and Academy-style training before being offered a position.

                            Departments recieve stacks upon stacks of applications from young and enthusiastic security officers, so if you decide to go that route, make sure your application stands out!

                            Best of luck to you, KingB.

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