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  • Officer Next Door Program

    Anybody have any experience with this HUD program? I'm a NJ officer looking into it and could use any useful information. Thanks.

  • #2
    They offered it here. Hardly anybody did it because no officer at the income level there was wanted to live in the 'hood.
    Those that did it regretted it later and moved on.

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    • #3
      Go to the local HUD office and get their listing. Bring your service pistol with you and your service rifle while your at it and drive around the places they have those houses. Usually, but not always, they are in an area that would be fun to patrol.
      "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

      For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

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      • #4
        For some reason they only pick places near the projects.. they stopped that program several years ago here in Miami Dade because people would buy houses and RENT them out.. I don't think they understood the point of that program..

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        • #5
          COP in the HOOD program

          I was in San Diego when they started there program. I had a few friends buy homes/condos and they all made pretty good money on their investment. ( I moved b-4 I could get in) Not sure how your system works but here they would post a new list on their web page and you could view the properties b-4 putting in your bid. It was luck of the draw if more than one officer put in for the same house.

          Pros: -Homes were being offered to officers at half the market value for a promise of a three year stay.
          -Closing costs were only about 2 grand on any home, money was refundable if you didn't get the home.
          - Some homes were in alright areas. They zoned them by zip so it may have been in a bad Zip but an OK neighborhood.
          - after three years you could sell at full market value and keep the profit.

          Cons: -The homes are not always in "good" shape and even need A LOT of work to be livable.
          - Most times you are in the hood, but that's why they made the program .... get cops in a bad neighborhood. But there are the occasional diamonds in the rough.


          If you have family, I would seriously consider not doing it unless you find that diamond. If your single, get some cop roomates and have at it. I had 2 buddies buy condos in fairly decent areas for about 45-55 thousand. Half market value at time. 1 year later San Diego area goes through a huge real estate boom. On third year one sold for just over 200 thousand. (not the norm) But still sweet.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the information fellas. I understand that the homes are in "revitalization areas." I'm an officer in New Jersey and homes are listed in Newark, Irvington, Trenton, Jersey City. Being single I thought that it may be a good investment. Does anyone have any first-hand experience with the program? I was wondering because honestly I wouldn't want to live in these areas but would be able to claim the home as my permanent residence because at the time I live with my girlfriend. How strictly does HUD enforce the "OCCUPY for 3 years" rule?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Apollon
              Thanks for the information fellas. I understand that the homes are in "revitalization areas." I'm an officer in New Jersey and homes are listed in Newark, Irvington, Trenton, Jersey City. Being single I thought that it may be a good investment. Does anyone have any first-hand experience with the program? I was wondering because honestly I wouldn't want to live in these areas but would be able to claim the home as my permanent residence because at the time I live with my girlfriend. How strictly does HUD enforce the "OCCUPY for 3 years" rule?
              I have seen several cases where the officers have been prosecuted for violation of the 3 year rule. It has been so abused the feds are looking to make examples out of people now. I also know officers that got into this program. They regreted every minute of it. The neighborhoods these homes are in are terrible. I know one cop that bought one. He would let me hide in his back yourd to watch the crack dealers on the next street. Is that the enviornment you want to live in? Seriously, why is the government offering this? Because no one wants to live there.
              I owned "ghetto property" at one time. I could not work outside without my gun on me. I found bullet holes in the garage door numerous times. I made very little off the sale because no one wanted to live in that area.

              Any real estate agent will tell you, the three most important words in the real estate are "location location location. Look for the best neighorhood you can afford. Buy there even if it is the smallest house in the neighborhood. You can always ad on or upgrade. Invest in the neighborhood, not the house.

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              • #8
                I have. I am living in one now. I have 1/2 year left, then I have a choice of staying, moving out or selling. It's a great program. Great opportunity to buy then sell. 50 plus % profit!!!! One good piece of advice though, once you get the mortgage, refinance, drop the insurance, that
                live everyday as if it your last...because one day it will be

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                • #9
                  My old partner did this over ten years ago... still living at the same place, of course, all fixed up now. it's pretty cool.


                  pick the residence / neighborhood well and the motto goes...


                  location, location, location.
                  ''Life's tough......it's tougher if you're stupid.''
                  -- John Wayne

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                  • #10
                    Sorry dude, no first-hand knowledge here, but as an example...

                    I was looking for a house in my area a while back on that program. The only one for sale was this house that I had been to on a call about a year before because a guy OD'd on heroin in the front yard. I'll never forget this place, because there hadn't been any power for a while and the guys in there had rigged the whole place up with about 20 car batteries that ran the lights, TV, and stereo. They had an extension cord running to the neighbor's that was hooked to a battery charger to keep the car batteries charged. Someone was cooking with a propane stove with an open flame in the kitchen.

                    They hadn't had running water for months and the toliet was overflowing with...well, you know.

                    There were needles all over the floor, and one of the bathtubs was full of dog food for the two Great Dane watchdogs.

                    All the dopers took off when they saw PD, but we called the Fire Marshall and had the place condemed as a fire hazard. We eventually realized that was a big mistake because we ended up going back again and again...should have just let them keep on because it would have burned down eventually.

                    As soon as I saw that house in the HUD listings, I forgot that idea.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sha4433
                      Sorry dude, no first-hand knowledge here, but as an example...

                      I was looking for a house in my area a while back on that program. The only one for sale was this house that I had been to on a call about a year before because a guy OD'd on heroin in the front yard. I'll never forget this place, because there hadn't been any power for a while and the guys in there had rigged the whole place up with about 20 car batteries that ran the lights, TV, and stereo. They had an extension cord running to the neighbor's that was hooked to a battery charger to keep the car batteries charged. Someone was cooking with a propane stove with an open flame in the kitchen.

                      They hadn't had running water for months and the toliet was overflowing with...well, you know.

                      There were needles all over the floor, and one of the bathtubs was full of dog food for the two Great Dane watchdogs.

                      All the dopers took off when they saw PD, but we called the Fire Marshall and had the place condemed as a fire hazard. We eventually realized that was a big mistake because we ended up going back again and again...should have just let them keep on because it would have burned down eventually.

                      As soon as I saw that house in the HUD listings, I forgot that idea.
                      Yes some are like this but not all. My friend who is a PAPD officer got one in Suffolk border with Nassau, Long Island. Nice home, good neighbors. Prior to getting mine I looked at a few prior to even getting "awarded" one through the lottery. Some were without a doubt BAD, holes in walls, floor, bathrooms smashed, kitchens- what kitchen?. you look at these and move on to the next. if you are looking for a great investment and an incredibly LOW LOW LOW mortage on a 250,000 house (OND price 175,000), then this program is for you. JUST DON'T TRY AND BEAT THE SYSTEM and **** IT UP FOR OTHERS (those dumb *** cops who got caught, screwed up the program for a year). Only another 1/2 year and I can sell (make more than 50% profit) then get another OND House (does any one see a pattern $$$$$$)
                      Last edited by sob153; 06-06-2005, 09:40 AM.
                      live everyday as if it your last...because one day it will be

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                      • #12
                        My experience:

                        Bought a home pre-housing boom in Long Beach (CA) for $60k. Not a bad neighborhood, not too good though. I was single, no kids, 24 at that time. Long story short, sold it three years (to the day) after buying, and made $180k profit. Now I have a great home for my wife and sons.

                        The bad news:

                        I spoke with a guy from HUD (who is also a reserve police officer) who said the program is on its way out. He states the housing boom killed the program, because any box of crap with four walls and a roof sells for about eight times its actual value. Why would HUD sell it to us when they can make a killing on it? Add in the fact many cops abused the program and you can see how the program will fade.

                        The good news:

                        The "bubble" may burst soon, if so, maybe the program will get new life. Who knows?
                        Officer, I borrowed these pants!

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                        • #13
                          We have it here most of the homes are in the armpit of the city that I work in, first off I won't live where I work, second off I won't bring my kids to live in the middle of da hood.
                          "I am the guy that keeps Mister Dead in his pocket." -'Mad' Max Rockatansky

                          "An Englewood Ranger is no stranger to Danger.." -Unk

                          Good Night Chesty Where Ever You Are.

                          A Good Friend will bail you out of jail, but a true friend will be sitting next to you in the cell saying, "That was Awesome."

                          Second City Cop

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                          • #14
                            When I was a civilian police officer, my girlfriend(also a police officer) and I took part in this program. It didn't seem tht bad at first until people started knocking on our door at 3am becuase their dog got loose and was running through the neighborhood or our neighbor (who knew we were cops by the way) got mad at one of his sellers and blasted him from the 2nd floor of his townhome with a shotgun. When I say next door, I mean so close, I could almost hear him rack the shotgun through the walls.
                            "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
                            Thomas Jefferson

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                            • #15
                              Thnaks for all the input

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