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I just hate people sometimes

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  • I just hate people sometimes

    I got this from my local paper. We are about 100 miles north of Alexandria.

    The mother seems to be the only one with her head on straight.

    http://www.thenewsstar.com/html/FDDDCDD5-24EE-4740-A3FE-36C7B38A164C.shtml

    NAACP holds vigil for Molette
    Louisiana Gannett News
    Posted on February 27, 2003
    A plea for peace from Janice Molette cut through the swell of anti-police rhetoric, quieting a crowd gathered Wednesday at Alexandria Convention Hall.

    "I'm fearful," the mother of slain gunman Anthony Molette said, "that some of these other young men and young women think my son was a hero.

    "I don't want this. I don't want this at all."

    Anthony Molette, 25, was involved in a Feb. 20 firefight in the Sonia Quarters where two Alexandria police officers were shot and killed. Molette's funeral is 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

    "I have a lot on my heart," a soft-spoken Janice Molette said at the NAACP-sponsored rally held in her son's name.

    She made it clear she did not want vengeance for her son's death; neither did she want others to seek retribution against the police who shot him.

    "I want answers," she said. "I don't want revenge. I do not condone what my child has done, but I would like to know the full situation."

    Instead of letting the experience pull apart the community, Janice Molette asked that people "come together and work as a family, as a community and let's try to change."

    She did not want her son's actions to destroy her community or to lead to further suffering.

    "I don't want my son's death to lead to more deaths. I want my son's death to lead to change."

    She also urged anyone considering assaulting police officers to talk to her instead.

    Molette's calm words were a contrast to others speaking at the rally. While stopping short of advocating violence against the police, other speakers demanded answers and related a list of complaints against officers.

    "Why was our neighborhood invaded?" asked Joe Buckner, president of the Alexandria chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "Why was our community shot up? Why were our old people and children not evacuated?"

    Here's another link about what was said at the vigil. THis one kinda ticks me off.

    http://www.thetowntalk.com/html/1344FFAE-D1A7-40EB-9A1D-7A3BD1BC5C6D.shtml

    Slain gunman's mother issues call for peace
    Others advocate resistance
    Suzan Manuel / Staff Reporter
    Posted on February 27, 2003

    Douglas Collier / Staff Photographer

    A plea for peace from Janice Molette cut through the swell of anti-cop rhetoric, quieting a crowd gathered Wednesday at Alexandria Convention Hall.

    "I'm fearful," the mother of slain gunman Anthony Molette said, "that some of these other young men and young women think my son was a hero.

    "I don't want this. I don't want this at all."

    Anthony Molette, 25, shot and killed two Alexandria police officers in a Feb. 20 firefight in the Sonia Quarters. Molette's funeral is 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

    "I have a lot on my heart," a soft-spoken Janice Molette said at the NAACP-sponsored rally held in her son's name. "I have cried many tears and I pray every night I have the strength to carry me on another day."

    She made it clear she did not want vengeance for her son's death, nor did she want others to seek retribution against the police who shot him.

    "I want answers," she said. "I don't want revenge. I do not condone what my child has done, but I would like to know the full situation."

    Instead of letting the experience pull apart the community, Janice Molette asked that people "come together and work as a family, as a community and let's try to change."

    She did not want her son's actions to destroy her community, nor lead to further suffering.

    "I don't want my son's death to lead to more deaths. I want my son's death to lead to change."

    She also urged anyone considering assaulting police officers to talk to her instead.

    Molette's calm words were a contrast to others speaking at the rally. While stopping short of advocating violence against the police, other speakers demanded answers and related a list of complaints against officers.

    "Why was our neighborhood invaded?" asked Joe Buckner, president of the Alexandria chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "Why was our community shot up? Why was our old people and children not evacuated?"

    Buckner said police are picking up young Sonia Quarters residents in an effort to "get you to rat on one another."

    Pastor Clarence Douglas of True Divine Ministry in New Iberia warned young black people to "watch your step. It ain't so much what you're doing, it's just being black."

    The crowd applauded the statement.

    He told the crowd if they were tired of being victims, they needed to have people at the city council meetings to represent their interest, to become more involved in their local government and make their concerns known.

    "When you see your sisters and brothers being victimized, pull over and take a picture," he said, urging the community to gather proof of police abuse.

    "The war of terrorism in America is worse than terrorism in another nation," he said. "The terrorists is here."

    The Rev. Raymond Brown, Louisiana chapter president of Al Sharpton's National Action Network and minister of defense for the New Black Panther Party, advocated stronger resistance.

    While saying people should not go out and kill cops, he said innocent people should use "a low level of force" to resist wrongful arrest.

    "You have the right to resist and refuse to go to jail," Brown said. "If they (the police) go upside your head and beat you, you go upside their head."

    Only the innocent should resist, however, he said. The guilty should submit to the police.

    "I advocate that you have the right to resist a beating," he said. "I do not advocate that you go out and hit a police officer," he said when the crowd began shouting loudly.

    Buckner tried to calm the crowd, as well.

    "Sometimes, we get carried away," he said. "We cannot afford to make war."

    God is on the side of the black man, he said.

    "This is a healing time for whites and blacks. This is not a discrimination issue, this is an abuse issue."

    It appears scumbags run in the family.Pineville is a suburb of Alexandria.

    http://www.thetowntalk.com/update/1046380312.shtml


    Anthony Molette's brother arrested in Pineville

    Posted on February 27, 2003

    Douglas Collier

    Rapides Sheriff William "Earl" Hilton said his department got an anonymous tip today that Shon Molette was in the Wardville area of Pineville.
    Molette surrendered to Hilton without incident this afternoon. Molette, the brother of Anthony Molette, was wanted in connection with a shooting unrelated to the one in which his brother shot and killed two Alexandria police officers one week ago.
    During the search, Slocum Elementary School was locked down because of a nearby disturbance
    Parents were allowed to take children home later this afternoon.

    [ 02-27-2003, 09:26 PM: Message edited by: dubya ]
    TRAVIS ED WILLIAMS
    Police Officer
    Mesquite, Texas, P.D.
    Mesquite, TX
    Date of Death: 09/23/1974

  • #2
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., once said: “Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

    Sounds like the mother understands that. Sounds like too much of the neighborhood doesn't.

    Cops get caught in the middle of the hatred, become a sort of lightning rod for it. My prayers are with them, that they will be kept safe in body, mind, and soul, and that they won't be infected by the hatred themselves.

    On a personal note, it always makes me especially sad (and angry!) to hear a clergy person adding to the problem.
    We do not all come to religion over the wandering years,
    but sooner or later we all get to meet God. -- Edward Conlon

    Comment


    • #3
      QUOTE:
      "He told the crowd if they were tired of being victims , they needed to have people at the city council meetings to represent their interest, to become more involved in their local government and make their concerns known."

      "When you see your sisters and brothers being victimized , pull over and take a picture," he said, urging the community to gather proof of police abuse."

      yeah....ALWAYS the victim and never the problem. it's ALWAYS someone else's fault.

      the POH-LICE are ALWAYS the bad guy.



      that's as nice as i can put it without getting banned on this forum so we'll leave it at that.
      I'll post, You argue.

      Comment

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