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  • DaveInTx
    replied
    Well, I can't top that story, but I remember an amusing incident at Shaw AFB, SC in the 1970s. One of my troops frequently rode a bicycle to work and one day he was stopped by the Air Police and issued a ticket for riding 45 mph in a 25 mph zone. He was worried, because speeding tickets were automatically dispatched to the offender's commanding officer for disciplinary action. He wondered what he should do about it. I checked out his bicycle, chuckled a little to myself, and told him I'd take care of it for him. I went to the Colonel (our commander) and advised him that this ticket would be coming, but that my troop was a good kid and I was pretty sure he was not travelling anywhere near 45 mph on his bicycle (which was not a racing type, even!). I explained that the radar guns of that period reported the maximum Doppler shift received from the target vehicle if that signal was not dwarfed by a much stronger signal from the same direction. My worker's bicycle was not bulky, so the reflection from the frame was not likely to be stronger than the reflections from the spokes of the wheels (which were about the right length to resonate at the radar frequency). If you are familiar with how a wheel works, the bottom of the wheel (in contact with the ground) moves so slowly that it is almost motionless (the edge is motionless) but the top of the wheel is moving forward at almost twice the forward speed of the bicycle, itself. Since the radar responded to the maximimum speed "seen", it was reporting the forward speed of the top area of the wheel, and that meant that the bicycle itself was only moving about 22 mph (which was still a pretty good clip, but legal). Our commander had a lot of faith in my mathematical/scientific abilities and he told me to let my troop know that he understood the situation and not to worry about it. (He also said that if he had been going 45 mph on his bicycle he'd probably just pass on it, anyway--it was a terrific feat.)

    DaveInTx
    Texan By Choice, not Accident

    Leave a comment:


  • Fastie
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Frank Booth:
    Speaking of going fast......There's a new roller coaster at Cedar Pointe that's over 400 feet tall, goes STRAIGHT down and TWISTS, and gets up to 120 mph!! Looks pretty intimidating.

    [Eek!] THAT sounds awesome !!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kingseye
    replied
    I'm sure snopes is right about the story being an urban legend, but this little bit of the critique is false (or maybe just dated):

    "Next, and very important to our understanding of this legend, the systems on military aircraft will not automatically arm and fire offensive ordnance. This is the case to specifically prevent incidents such as the one described in this story. There's no way that the Tornado's systems would auto-arm a missile, much less try to fire it without a human "go" signal. "

    My cousin is an avionics tech in the Navy....this capability isn't even classified anymore......(then again, he doesn't work on Tornados )

    Leave a comment:


  • JKT
    replied
    A buddy of mine was in the Navy, on a small carrier back in the 70's, and at one of their stateside port, the local LE like to clock them coming off base, and write them for as little as 5 over.

    So, the ECM guys got the bright idea that they would solve that little problem.

    After they pulled into port one time, the ECM folks trained a jamming radar in the direction of the highway, and waited until they detected a radar emitter.

    Then, they turned on the jammer for a few seconds.

    It is reported that the LEO's radar started smoking, and he had a heck of a time expalining to his chief what had happened.

    Leave a comment:


  • huff317
    replied
    I also have heard of the radar units being fried.
    Haven't seen it yet, and to put it mildly, I have had the opportunity to measure some pretty fast movers at the EOR on several AFB's nationwide.

    The tone IS cool, though. [Eek!]

    Out

    Leave a comment:


  • p01ic3m4n
    replied
    you mean i was betrayed by motor trend??? this cannot be. [Frown]

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob A
    replied
    This specific story is certainly all UL, but I know from talking to several USMC Cobra pilots, and a family friend who is a former PD helo pilot and retired USA WO helo pilot, that the military does "lock on" to ground "targets" such as soccer moms in SUVs or trucks and even ships.

    I've never heard of an actual launch against one, or that LE radar would be ID'd as a source of threat (Microwave ovens have much more powerful magnetrons than LE radar) I've always wondered what they do to prevent this from happening.

    The idea makes me a little uncomfortable.

    Leave a comment:


  • RachelR
    replied
    Frank, lol. My brother was just telling me ALL about that rollercoaster last night.. hehe

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied


    [ 04-04-2003, 09:01 PM: Message edited by: Frank Booth ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If it really happened, why did the radar unit get damaged? Did the Harrier have some kind of "radar fryer"? You can clock items at very fast speeds all the time without hurting it (ie. the fan blades on your car's heating and cooling system.) Secondly, there are tons of radar sources in use all over the place, 24/7, and you don't hear of them being blasted by HARM missles. Why don't we try to come up with a good police urban legend and see how far it will go? I like the one with the burglar, the toothbrushes and the camera. I'd like to come up with something like that...

    Leave a comment:


  • Sig220Man
    replied
    Once again, Snopes has come to the rescue, and has verified what Frank and I suspected: It's another Urban Myth:

    http://www.snopes.com/horrors/techno/radar.htm

    Thanks Nite for letting us now about this site!

    Leave a comment:


  • p01ic3m4n
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Frank Booth:
    Sounds like an urban legend to me....

    it's not. it was originally featured in an article of PILOT magazine then a few others picked it up. i believe it was also in motor trend, which is the issue i read it from.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sig220Man
    replied
    I'm not one to agree with Frank, but I think he's right.

    I heard a version of this story back in 1996 (two years before this incident supposedly occurred), when I attended Radar Certification School. The version I heard involved a Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy assigned somewhere out in the Antelope Valley (nearby are Air Force Plant 42, Edwards AFB, and China Lake NAS) who decided to clock an overhead Stealth Bomber.

    The rest of the story is similar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Sounds like an urban legend to me....

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Just goes to show you that the old saying from An American Werewolf in London is right!!!

    "STAY OFF THE MOOOORS"!!!!

    Leave a comment:

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