Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Military questions

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Military questions

    I'm very confused. OK, that's not a big revelation to those that know me, but lately I've been confounded by all the talk about National Guard units and Reserve units and so on. Since I never did the military thing, I've never completely understood where all these various groups fit in.

    First of all, here's what I think I know about the following:

    Regular Military -- The standing, active-duty, full-time folks in the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines (and, I guess, sometimes the Coast Guard).

    Reserve - Really kind of hazy on this one.

    National Guard - State-governed militia that can be activated by the federal government and then come under the direction of the Regular Military.

    Here are some questions I have:

    I've heard of Active Reserve and Inactive Reserve. Does this have anything to do with the Reserves mentioned above, or is it a completely different thing?

    I've known people that were full-time employees of the National Guard, Air Guard and Army Reserve. But I thought these were all people doing this on a part-time level. What gives?

    Can a person come out of one service (say, the Air Force) and then go to work for a completely different Reserve or Guard unit (like the Army Reserve)?

    A city where I once lived had a Coast Guard Auxiliary station. Where does that fit into the mix? Can these guys get activated for military service like the Guard or Reserve also?

    If someone chooses to join the National Guard, do they still have to go through the same basic training as the Regular Military folks?

    Can a person with no military experience simply join the Reserve?

    I've heard that some states have militia units (and I'm not talking about the wackos) that are charged with preserving public order and cannot be activated by the federal government. I'm pretty sure Texas and Tennessee have them. Are they modeled on the National Guard, or do they work differently?

    Can a person who is a volunteer with, say, the National Guard, transfer to the Reserve, or even the Regular Military?

    In our state we have Army National Guard and Air Guard. Are there Navy Guard units? I know WI is kind of land-locked, but we are surrounded on 3 sides by navigable waterways. Is the Navy Guard, if it exists, only on the coasts?

    I'm sure I'll have more questions later, but this'll suffice for now.

    Enlighten me, O Wise Ones.
    Caution and worry never accomplished anything.

  • #2
    Re: Military questions

    Originally posted by kirch

    First of all, here's what I think I know about the following:

    Regular Military -- The standing, active-duty, full-time folks in the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines (and, I guess, sometimes the Coast Guard).
    Correct, and you can definitely include the Coasties in this as well.

    Reserve - Really kind of hazy on this one.
    The Reserves are just like the regular military in that they both are part of the Federal Government. Unlike active duty, however, reservists usually stay close to home. They drill at least one weekend a month and two weeks a year, though I know some reserve units do put more time in. They can also be called up to active duty when there is a manpower need.

    National Guard - State-governed militia that can be activated by the federal government and then come under the direction of the Regular Military.
    Yup. When they aren't "Federalized" they drill like the reserves do, at least one weekend a month and two weeks a year. Again, some units will put more time than that in.

    They are under the control of the Governor of their state when they are not "Federalized" and can be called up during states of emergency like riots or natural disasters.

    I've heard of Active Reserve and Inactive Reserve. Does this have anything to do with the Reserves mentioned above, or is it a completely different thing?
    Active reserves are like described above. Inactive reserves are a list of personnel that can be called up if the need arises. They do not drill unless called up. I believe that after serving in the regular military, you are placed on the inactive reserve list for a few years. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong here)


    Can a person come out of one service (say, the Air Force) and then go to work for a completely different Reserve or Guard unit (like the Army Reserve)?
    Yup. I know a guy who was an active duty Marine. When he got out, he joined the California National Guard.

    A city where I once lived had a Coast Guard Auxiliary station. Where does that fit into the mix? Can these guys get activated for military service like the Guard or Reserve also?
    I believe Coast Guard Auxiliary are citizen volunteers that help out the Coast Guard. I am not positive on this though.

    If someone chooses to join the National Guard, do they still have to go through the same basic training as the Regular Military folks?
    Yes, at least for the Army National guard. I do not know if this is the case for the Air National Guard though.

    Can a person with no military experience simply join the Reserve?
    Yes, you can either enlist or go the officer route (if qualified) just as if you were joining the active duty military.

    Can a person who is a volunteer with, say, the National Guard, transfer to the Reserve, or even the Regular Military?
    I know you can be transferred from Reserve status to active duty with the proper approvals. I do not know if you can move from the Guard to reserves, etc.

    In our state we have Army National Guard and Air Guard. Are there Navy Guard units?
    Not as far as I know. That duty falls with the Coast Guard.
    I'm sure I'll have more questions later, but this'll suffice for now.

    I hope that helps. If I'm wrong on something, please somebody correct me.

    Monty
    Hail hail the gang's all here, when the going gets tough I know my friends will still be there. - Drop Kick Murphys, "The Gang's all Here"

    Comment


    • #3
      As far as the inactive reserves go, every enlistment in the military is basically 8 years. This eight years is broken up between active duty and inactive reserve. For example, I served active duty for four years. Now, I am on 4 years Inactive Reserves (for a total of 8 years). I don't drill, muster, ever wear a uniform, etc. The only contact I have with the military is keeping them updated as to my address when I move. Basically the Inactive Reserves are a pool of recently separated veterans that can be recalled to active duty if necessary when normal deployments aren't cutting it. This would basically be done in conjunction with the draft (they have to be seriously hurting for people to call up inactive reserves in most cases).

      If you serve 8 years active duty, you have no inactive reserve time (your 8 year enlistment is fulfilled). If you serve 2 active duty, you have 6 inactive reserves, etc. Drilling reserve time (regular reserves) count toward this total 8 years as well.
      Sometimes I look at a person, and I just think, 'That person, right there, is the lowest common denominator.'

      Comment


      • #4
        I can speak for Active Duty Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserves. The term RESERVES is used generically to cover all National Guard and Reserves from all branches.

        The biggest shift came a few years ago when the National Guard Bureau made a drug deal to get all combat units in the NG, and combat support units to the Reserves. Logistically it's a nightmare.

        All require the same Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training (whatever your job is, ie MPs train separately from Medics). Sometimes professional development schools are abbreviated for Reservists. But other than that, they train side-by-side with the regulars.

        You can bounce around pretty much as often as you like in the Guard and Reserve, depending on whether or not your unit/state lets you go.

        Army and Air Force have Reserves and National Guard. Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard have Reserves only.

        There are also different Reserve elements (Army Reserve Element, Individual Mobilization Augmentee) who are not assigned to any unit in particular, but can be mobilized for training and deployments as needed. They are in control groups and consist of mostly senior officers and non-commisioned officers with lots of service time.

        There's alot more to it than you see on a brochure or a commercial.
        Whitechapel - Hate Creation

        Comment


        • #5
          Kirch,

          In reply to your question of ,"I've known people that were full-time employees of the National Guard, Air Guard and Army Reserve. But I thought these were all people doing this on a part-time level. What gives?"

          There is a small number of people in each unit who are full time employees. They usually handle the command and logistically things necessary to keep the unit running. A few examples of "full timers" are: Supply Sergeant, Training NCO, Mechanics, Commander, etc. They receive the same pay and benefits as regular Army personnel.
          "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."

          Comment


          • #6
            Is it still true that:

            1. Reservists can be called up individually?

            2. National Guardsmen have to be called up as an entire unit?

            Thus you are generally better off joining the National Guard if you don't want to have your life rudely interupted?
            I know I should feed the trolls but it is just SO hard.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think if you have a skill set that is needed they can call you up. I know that myold unit USAF Reserves was colocated with a Air Guard unit. Right after Spet 11th they called up a certain people in the Resver and Air Guard Unit with a certain skill set. The entire unit was called up a few days later but those guys where called up first.
              There are two ways to work for a miliatry unit in the guard or reserve, 1 AGR which stands for Active duty Guard,Reserve. They are payed their military pay and benefits, 2 ART which is what I did for 3 years which stands for Air Force Reserve Tech, you are a federal employee and are payed by the Department of defense and have benefits through them, you also have to complete your Reserve comitment of 1 weekend a month two weeks a year.
              Last edited by squad51; 04-30-2004, 12:36 AM.
              Happy to be here proud to serve

              "Well it appears this lock does not accept american express."

              Never trust fire fighters to point out a suspect.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by squad51
                I think if you have a skill set that is needed they can call you up.
                That was my understanding to a point, but I think they need congressional approval as well. Ironically, I just got a survey in the mail this past weekend to update my status. The timing is interesting given all that's going on, I'm hoping it's a once-a-year deal and not a your-***-is-getting-recalled deal. One of the questions asks if I acquired any new foreign language skills (thank christ I didn't take any Arabic classes, I already wasted away one year of my life in the Middle East), and another asks if there is any reason I could not report to be mobilized within 7 days (**** yeah! How many reasons you want???!!!!)
                Sometimes I look at a person, and I just think, 'That person, right there, is the lowest common denominator.'

                Comment


                • #9
                  "Active Reserve" refers to those people working full-time at a reserve unit. They even get their own special license plate here....we have one for reserves, and one for active reserves.

                  Kristen

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Navy Guy
                    Is it still true that:

                    1. Reservists can be called up individually?

                    2. National Guardsmen have to be called up as an entire unit?

                    Thus you are generally better off joining the National Guard if you don't want to have your life rudely interupted?
                    Reservists AND Guarsmen can be called up individually. If the Federal Gov't needs you, they get you. Example: My type of unit has 6 teams of about 12 guys each. The acitive duty is same-same. In 1995, our active duty buddies requested 2 additional teams from the guard (us) to augment their 6 teams that were deploying to Haiti (the FIRST Hatian vacation).

                    There is a bill that says you cannot involuntarily be on Title 10 (Federal) more than 24 months out of 60. This is where the budgeters and politicians make their money. They have to balance forces because different states have different units, and some are used more than others, ie MPs.

                    Reservists and Guardsmen can be activated as units, individuals, or volunteers to augment other reserve and active units. Guys that were in the IMA (Individual Mobilization Augmentees) were activated for a full 24 months straight to be instructors at Fort Bragg, NC.

                    I've been INVOLUNTARILY mobilized off and on for about 30 total months since 9-11. I've also volunteered a few times to go on active duty for missions.

                    But if you don't want your life RUDELY interupted, you should opt to stay out altogether.
                    Whitechapel - Hate Creation

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kirch, I'll give you a little history on me and it should clear up some of your questions. I enlisted and was active duty, regular Army for 4 years. I got out and was in the Army reserves. Since then I switched to the National Guard, which I am currently in. Ironically, Im looking at switching to the Air Guard next year.
                      In regards to your basic training question, the responses you got are correct. There is one exception. If a person has completed basic with the Army, Air Force or Navy you can switch around between the three. But to join the Marines you have to complete Marine basic. A Marine can switch to the others but not vice-versa.
                      Individuals can be called to active duty seperatly. Based on prior military experience or civilian experience. I currently belong to a Field Artillery Unit. One of our guys had been active duty as a generator mechanic. He has since been activated for his past experience. Also, our Unit has several civilian cops in it. We have already been asked to volunteer to be activated and notified we may be called up individually because of civilian experience.
                      In regards to your Navy question. We do have a Navy Reserve Unit in Green Bay, which is currently deployed.
                      One final note, if a Guard Unit is activated, and they are not at full staffing, individual soliders may be assigned from other units to fill the activated unit.

                      Comment

                      MR300x250 Tablet

                      Collapse

                      What's Going On

                      Collapse

                      There are currently 3434 users online. 267 members and 3167 guests.

                      Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                      Welcome Ad

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X