Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone familiar with flashing 'courtesy lights'?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • kirch
    replied
    jeeper:

    I should qualify my previous post.

    I can't remember the exact wording of the law (I looked it up once) but EMTs and volunteer firefighters CAN have red lights in the personal vehicles. However, they can't exceed any traffic laws UNLESS:

    1. They have a siren also and are using the light AND siren.
    2. They have EVOC (Emergency Vehicle Operation Certification).

    The decision on whether or not EMTs and firefighters are allowed to use red lights and sirens in their personal vehicles is up to the chief. We have separate fire and EMS directors where I live and the fire chief gives blanket approval for firefighters to have red lights in their vehicles. Most do speed, roll through stop signs, etc. enroute to call even though none of them have sirens and, therefore, are technically in violation of the law.

    The EMS director, after researching the subject and consulting attorneys, decided not to authorize any responding EMTs to have red lights and sirens in their personal vehicles. His determination was that there is too great a liability for the organization if an EMT responding to a scene or the station were to be involved in an accident while running with a red light only, or without EVOC.

    This causes some friction with volunteer firefighters who are also EMTs. Several have used their red lights while responding as EMTs and been warned against doing so in the future.

    Personally, I like the idea of courtesy lights and green seems like a good color. I believe most people, if they see the lights, are willing to get out of the way. But, no matter what color the light is, people who don't have the proper training and equipment have to be taught that they can't ignore traffic laws.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sig220Man
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Don:
    I never really understoody why California is so damn anal about this.

    The California Vehicle Code is rather anal about a lot of things

    Leave a comment:


  • Don
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Sig220Man:
    I can't find any references to Volunteer Firefighters in the California Vehicle Code,

    Because there IS none. A volunteer firefighter driving his POV has NO legal ability to drive "outside" of the traffic rules and regs. I never really understoody why California is so damn anal about this. Considering where I lived there, volunteers were often the ONLY fire department in any given area. And volunteer EMTs were the ONLY ambulance personnel there.

    Leave a comment:


  • BAP
    replied
    Here In NY, under section 375 of the VTL. Vol ambl. can use green lights on their private vehicles. Blue lights can be used by vol. fire and red lights are for use by all emergency vehicle. It is a warning light only, to ID the vehicle and for people to move out of the way, they usually don't. All users of the light must obey all traffic laws when responding and must have an authorization card from their chief to display. There are a number of stipulations that go on about the use of the light in this section

    Leave a comment:


  • SCSOsgt.
    replied
    In NY,
    - green lights are used for EMS personnel in POV's.
    - Blue lights are used for volunteer fireman in POV's.

    Both have no authority to respond as emergency vehicles ( can't speed, pass trafic, disregard one-way, etc ).

    - Fire chiefs and Asst. Chiefs of volunteer depts. are given red lights and sirens for their POV's, and they can respond under emergency vehicle authority.

    - Amber lights can be used by most everyone else ( construction/slow moving/escort vehicles, tow trucks, delivery vehicles ). This type of light serves only as an added warning, it gives no special authority to the user.

    - Police and fire vehicles use red lights ( sometimes with combinations of white,amber, or blue ).

    Leave a comment:


  • KYGlockShooter
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by PatrickM98:
    Technically that is incorrect. While some volunteer departments may have specific regulations, the Kentucky Revised Statutes give ALL volunteers the right to display emergency lights.

    KRS 189.910 defines an emergency vehicle as "...any motor vehicle used by a paid or volunteer fireman, paid or volunteer ambulance personnel...while responding to an emergency..."

    KRS 189.920 goes on to say that any of the above vehicles may be equipped with red flashing lights.

    I stand corrected.

    Leave a comment:


  • IPDBrad
    replied
    In Indiana:

    LE-Red/White/Blue
    Fire/Ambulance-Red/White
    Volunteer Fire (in POV's)-Blue
    Medical Personnel (in POV's)-Green
    Wreckers and road work crews or just about anyone who wants to install them-Amber

    I have never seen a green rotator.
    Lots of security wannabes use Red/Amber

    Green/Blue/Amber lights Do Not allow someone to circumvent any traffic laws.

    Leave a comment:


  • spo0k
    replied
    While I was recently in NYC, I noted that some emergency vehicles seem to always have their lights on, whether on a call or not. They were not trying to weave through traffic or anything, just driving through the streets like anyone else, but they had their lights on. Being from Ohio I found this curious, as whenever we have our lights on, whether we have sirens or not, we are given right of way. This is useful for those responses to the hospital where you need to get there quick, but dont want to make the patient more upset by using the siren. Of course, we will blip the siren here and there if traffic deems necessary.

    [ 02-12-2003, 12:09 PM: Message edited by: spo0k ]

    Leave a comment:


  • WHC166
    replied
    In several states, blue and green lights are considered "courtousy lights", and can not be used with a siren.

    Here in Vermont, police vehicles use Blue or Blue/White. Fire and EMS vehicles use Red or Red/White.

    Personal vehicles for Police, Fire, and EMS can recieve permits from the state, but you can only have one permit.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeeper
    replied
    Kirch, are you sure EMT's can't run red lights? In the LaCrosse area some of them do, although they also maybe FireFighters.

    In WI, with approval of the Fire Chief volunteers can run red lights/sirens/flashing headlights. And in that case their POV becomes an emergency vehicle.- Blue is LE ONLY.

    In New York, volunteer FFs can run full blue lighting packages on their personal cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • Traffic_Goddess
    replied
    This is a BIG pet peeve of mine...
    I wrote many a citation in regards to emergency lighting in regards to display and use.

    Green lights may only be used in PA for command posts. Blue lights may be used for POVs of responding EMS and fire personnel. Persons using them must have permission and be on a list maintained by the fire chief.

    IMO, the blue lights were a joke. When I was an EMT and ran ambulance, I received a lot of pressure to get a blue light...my response was always that it was better for the department to have a citizen say, "Look at the way that jerk is driving!", than, "Look at the way that jerk from the fire department is driving!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Delta_V
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by KYGlockShooter:
    Accually, Kentucky varies from county to county as to who can have emergency lights in their POVs.

    Technically that is incorrect. While some volunteer departments may have specific regulations, the Kentucky Revised Statutes give ALL volunteers the right to display emergency lights.

    KRS 189.910 defines an emergency vehicle as "...any motor vehicle used by a paid or volunteer fireman, paid or volunteer ambulance personnel...while responding to an emergency..."

    KRS 189.920 goes on to say that any of the above vehicles may be equipped with red flashing lights.

    Leave a comment:


  • ateamer
    replied
    The only green lights I know of are the center rotator on Battalion Chiefs' vehicles or other fire command vehicles.

    For some reason, security guard companies think they need amber lights on their cars. I don't know why, because they are not allowed to turn them on on a public road, unless they are on the scene of an emergency, such as running across a traffic accident.

    In New Mexico, I saw blue strobes on tow trucks. Interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • dc298
    replied
    In Ontario.......Red/White flashing are only used by Police..Fire and Ambulance...NO Vehicles other than previously mentioned can show red lights to the front) Blue is for snow plows..Green is for volunteer firefighters(no special priveleges just headway). Yellow/white for tow trucks and other vehicles that may be a hazard on the roadway..

    Leave a comment:


  • Peeler
    replied
    In the UK , some doctors have a green flashing light on the roofs of their cars. This does not give them any special priviledges on the road, however, as mentioned previously it warns other road users that there is an emergency doctor on route to something and therefore they will hopefully give precedence to him/her. Only doctors are allowed to use this colour.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 3636 users online. 239 members and 3397 guests.

Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X