Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

(sigh)

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • (sigh)

    I just found out this evening that my youngest brother, Steve, the one who is a CO, has decided not to be a PO and has decided he wants to go Active Duty in the Marines. He says the Reserves aren't enough for him, and he loves being a Marine so much that he wants to pursue it full time.

    Although I don't see him often, we are very close. I know this is what he wants, so in that respect, I'm very happy for him. But I miss him already.

    For those of you who were/are military, how difficult was it for you when you left your family?

  • #2
    Not really that hard KK. I went into the Marines right out of highschool as I had no desire to go to college. I was in the USMC for four years and despite all the crap, BS and dog and pony shows I loved it. I was a grunt (Combat Infantry) and spent most of my 4 years overseas. I got to see alot and experience even more.

    Sounds like he loves the USMC as much as I do/did, even though I was in back in 1979. He'll get time to come home on leave, etc. He'll enjoy it I'm sure. Best of luck to him.
    Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      I really am very proud of him for doing this.

      Thanks, Steve.

      Comment


      • #4
        If he is doing what he loves, he one of the lucky ones, katey. Loving your job is very important. I bet he's a great Marine.

        Comment


        • #5
          even though I was in back in 1979.
          I turned one year old in August, '79.

          Comment


          • #6
            Shut up, Crazy, afore I give you a kick in the diapers. lol

            Comment


            • #7

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Crazy in a Jeep:
                I turned one year old in August, '79.
                Crazy,

                BITE ME! You trying to imply that some of us are OLD around here?

                [ 06-23-2002: Message edited by: kateykakes ]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Crazy in a Jeep:


                  I turned one year old in August, '79.

                  hmmmm...a youngster

                  <doing the math>
                  2002 minus 1978 =

                  <getting calculator...mind is too old>
                  "You did what you knew how to do...and when you knew better, you did better." ~~Maya Angelou

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Katey, good luck to your brother, and i hope he likes it.

                    my nephew is in the Navy (about 6 years now), and my niece was in the Air Force. i know it was hardest on my sister (their mom). my nephew can make it wherEVER, since unfortunately he falls in with a group right away (and usually gets in trouble).

                    my niece didnt do well with it, and got married and pregnant and out of the service. she mostly missed all of us because of being so far away. she made friends, but it wasnt like the people who had known her her whole life. she married an Air Force guy, so they're still far away anyway!

                    i think it just depends on how far away someone is stationed if its important for them to get to see the family now and then.
                    "You did what you knew how to do...and when you knew better, you did better." ~~Maya Angelou

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was 4 months old

                      Originally posted by Crazy in a Jeep:


                      I turned one year old in August, '79.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Youngin!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I went in straight out of high school too. Didn't say good bye to any of my family. Just took my wallet with $20, my drivers license, and my SS card, and walked out the door. Left everything I owned in the house. Had a great time after that. Traveled all over the country, made some OUTSTANDING friends. Spent a year in Japan. Had a blast. Then there was stupid sh#t. That sucked and I got out to see what it was like being a civilian as a young person instead of waiting untill I was 40. (there's still stupid sh#t, the travel isn't free, and I haven't met nearly the same caliber of people, but the pay is slightly better. well maybe a little less stupid sh#t

                          I recommend it highly. If he went to boot camp and his MOS school already he shouldn't have any problems going active duty. He'll get to travel more and get the hell away from home for awhile. That's great. I loved the travel.

                          Be happy for him. It's no fun to be doing something that you want and have everyone back home shaking their heads and thinking that you're making a mistake.
                          On the wings of a dove
                          Let's roll for justice
                          Let's roll for truth
                          Let's not let our children grow up
                          Fearful in their youth -- Neil Young

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jarhead6073:
                            I recommend it highly. If he went to boot camp and his MOS school already he shouldn't have any problems going active duty. He'll get to travel more and get the hell away from home for awhile. That's great. I loved the travel.

                            Be happy for him. It's no fun to be doing something that you want and have everyone back home shaking their heads and thinking that you're making a mistake.

                            Jarhead,

                            My brother loved bootcamp. He got along well with everyone there too. Did what he was supposed to do and enjoyed it. He's been doing reserves for a year now and really wants to do it full time. He wrestled with the decision of doing active duty or being a PO, and after a year, he's made his decision. He's not happy being a CO and is in need of change.

                            Growing up the only girl with 3 brothers, I was constantly tormented. I love them all, and despite all the torment, he's the best brother I could ever ask for. 24 yo, has a good head on his shoulders, and is wise beyond his years. I'm very proud of him.

                            Thanks, jarhead. Much appreciated.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There's no comparision between a civilian job and a military career. You will find youself responsible for the lives of others, from day one. You actually train so hard, so often that when suddenly your on the ground of some country under fire, the conditions and your partners are the same as before.

                              You hear of the Special Forces nowadays a lot more than is healthy for them. They and the Navy Seals and other specialized units are composed of men who train in the US day to day, then go away for a few days or weeks and then reappear at their stateside units again. No one asks where they've been or have done. This is the way things are for those folks. They are as young as 20 or as old as 27.

                              But the ordinary straight leg soldier, the rifleman does the slogging and fighting one on one. If they can forge the papers right, a 16 year old can survive very well but it's not often you find someone active in the infantry past 30. They get rank fast because the turnover of soldiers is high. They have a reputation of being not very smart guys, but they know their weapons and dislike fighting from defense. The lowest ranking GI is capable of running a combat mission, can coordinate USAF strikes and lay a minefield.

                              A 18 year old kid can be in charge of a 12 man squad which is two fire teams. Two fire teams possess enough fire power and communications to overcome a Russian unit of 150 soldiers. This was often done against North Viet troops. But the point is: the people of that squad, of that unit will never forget the others. Those friendships are as tight as anything found in a police agency, for the same basic reasons.

                              Those people are young and lonely for their families, but will reach a point, just like peace officers, where it becomses a point of honor not to abandon their partners, though those partners one by one or sometimes more at once, pass on.

                              They can accomplish these things within the first year after basic training. Within the first year of an entry level civilian job, what can the worker be expected to achive?

                              Jim Burnes

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 4447 users online. 232 members and 4215 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X