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  • FBI concerned with rise in crime

    The head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation said Thursday he is “very concerned” about apparent sharp rises in violent crime and murder in cities across the country, saying he doesn’t know why it is happening but wants to find the answer.

    Earlier this week, the FBI released data showing violent crime dropped slightly in 2014, but many big city police departments have reported significant jumps in shootings this year compared with last year.

    When asked in a briefing with reporters about street crime in America, James Comey said, "I don’t know what’s going on, but I think we’ve got to stare at it.’’ He added that what has been described to him by police chiefs is a “nationwide phenomenon that’s centered in the cities... Something very, very worrisome is going on.’’

    Some police officials have suggested that a so-called "Ferguson effect’’ has resulted from heightened criticism of police since the killing of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., last year, as well as other instances of police killing unarmed black men. That criticism, according to the theory, has caused officers to be less aggressive and leave their patrol cars less, giving violent criminals more freedom to operate.

    RELATED

    Crime Fell Slightly in 2014, FBI Says (Sept. 28)
    But others dispute this, and Mr. Comey didn’t venture an opinion on the idea.

    “Some people have suggested to me a wind is blowing through law enforcement,’’ said Mr. Comey, but he said he didn’t know if that was true. “What I do know is a whole lot of people are dying. They are, according to the chiefs, overwhelmingly young men of color dying, and we’ve got to care about that.’’

    On the issue of terrorism, Mr. Comey said the frenetic pace of investigations of people in the United States who have been inspired by the Islamic State terror group apparently has stopped rising at the rapid rate seen in June and July.The numbers are still growing, he said, but not at the same speed they were previously.

    The FBI director said there could be a few reasons for this, including a growing perception that living conditions in Syria are poor, and that some arrested in the U.S. for trying to go to Syria have now received lengthy prison sentences.
    Last edited by BNWS; 10-02-2015, 05:39 PM.

  • #2
    I tried to attach a link to this WSJ article but had to copy and paste instead.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by BNWS View Post
      Some police officials have suggested that a so-called "Ferguson effect’’ has resulted from heightened criticism of police since the killing of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., last year, as well as other instances of police killing unarmed black men. That criticism, according to the theory, has caused officers to be less aggressive and leave their patrol cars less, giving violent criminals more freedom to operate.
      Gee, you think? We better hurry up and spend $100,000,000 to study the issue. Tell you what, cut me a check for 1% of that and I'll do a comprehensive study on this issue.
      Originally posted by kontemplerande
      Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's flat on the doorstep of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave....
        Now go home and get your shine box!

        Comment


        • #5
          I can tell you why,

          No Admin wants their city to become the next Ferguson. Our Admin flat out said that to us in training. The fact of the matter is that the rise in gang and drug related gun violence, to include murders, is an acceptable loss when it comes to media attention in the eyes of the city leaders and PD admin. The media rarely show up to the drive by shootings, or actual shootings, but one justified Officer involved shooting and the city bottom feeders and media loose their minds.

          Most of society doesn't care about the dirt bags shooting each other any more. Its to prevalent, to accepted, and to over-promoted in media and film.

          Every time we have a shooting or murder people ask me if it was either gang or drug related, and if the guy (or gal) was a dirt-bag. When I give them the inevitable "yes," the most common response is "good riddance." The admin shouldn't be scared of the media, but when society doesn't care, why should they give it the effort?

          That kind of attitude trickles down to the patrol officer. Why should I give extra patrol to that ghetto club that's been the scene of numerous shootings, a couple of murders, and the last two officer involved shootings? Why should I risk getting between two fools who society doesn't care about when they pull guns and knifes on each other. Is it worth the emotional roller coaster ride when I shoot one? Do I want to be stuck in the office in a no-public-contact desk job for six months? Most patrol I work with say no to all the above questions. We still care, and want to take care of business, but it's increasingly apparent that we are the only ones who want this.

          Society will spring back against this, eventually. But it's not going to until the violence spreads out of the crap areas and the dirt bags start victimizing people that society places a value on.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yep. That's it.
            Now go home and get your shine box!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
              It's flat on the doorstep of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave....
              Bingo, ya beat me to it. Let's see: We need go no further than Slap-Dick, his partner in crime, Eric Holder, and the current Attorney General. There, we fixed it for anyone wanting to know, including the Director of the FBI.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you can get the online article a lot of the comments reflect the opinions posted here.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BNWS View Post
                  If you can get the online article a lot of the comments reflect the opinions posted here.
                  I tried but the WSJ requires a subscription to read the entire story.
                  Train for tomorrow, for you never know what it will bring to the fight.
                  In the school of Policing, there is no graduation day.

                  Arguing on the internet, is like wrestling with a pig in mud. After a while you realize that while you are getting dirty, the pig is actually enjoying it.
                  Do Not Disturb sign should read, Already Disturbed Proceed With Caution.
                  Even if the voices aren't real, They have some really good ideas.

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                  • #10
                    If you copy the headline and paste it into the search box. When the choices appear click on the first one at the top of the page. It usually gives you the whole article. That's how I read the WSJ and NYT with out a subscription.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MIDWAY View Post
                      I can tell you why,

                      No Admin wants their city to become the next Ferguson. Our Admin flat out said that to us in training. The fact of the matter is that the rise in gang and drug related gun violence, to include murders, is an acceptable loss when it comes to media attention in the eyes of the city leaders and PD admin. The media rarely show up to the drive by shootings, or actual shootings, but one justified Officer involved shooting and the city bottom feeders and media loose their minds.

                      Most of society doesn't care about the dirt bags shooting each other any more. Its to prevalent, to accepted, and to over-promoted in media and film.

                      Every time we have a shooting or murder people ask me if it was either gang or drug related, and if the guy (or gal) was a dirt-bag. When I give them the inevitable "yes," the most common response is "good riddance." The admin shouldn't be scared of the media, but when society doesn't care, why should they give it the effort?

                      That kind of attitude trickles down to the patrol officer. Why should I give extra patrol to that ghetto club that's been the scene of numerous shootings, a couple of murders, and the last two officer involved shootings? Why should I risk getting between two fools who society doesn't care about when they pull guns and knifes on each other. Is it worth the emotional roller coaster ride when I shoot one? Do I want to be stuck in the office in a no-public-contact desk job for six months? Most patrol I work with say no to all the above questions. We still care, and want to take care of business, but it's increasingly apparent that we are the only ones who want this.

                      Society will spring back against this, eventually. But it's not going to until the violence spreads out of the crap areas and the dirt bags start victimizing people that society places a value on.
                      The average person isn't a dirtbag, thus they have little to fear from the murder of dirtbags.

                      The average person does on occasion encounter a cop. With the idiots chanting "unarmed" people fear encounters with cops. The real problem is the drive for eyeballs in the news media--they need to stir up controversy in order to get those eyeballs. Fox is no better about this, they're just stirring it up from the other direction.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I tell the rookies; Your average citizen is more vehemently concerned with the speeders driving by their house than they are of the gang related shooting a few blocks away. You'll do more for crime, and get more accolades from citizens and admin when you pull over those speeders, vs. looking for the gang banger carrying the gun.

                        I enjoy the look I get when I say this. It's really to bad it takes 5-7 years for that lesson to be learned.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ^^What CCCSD and PhilipCal said........

                          The FBI director only needs to look up the chain of command.................
                          It is better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MIDWAY View Post
                            I tell the rookies; Your average citizen is more vehemently concerned with the speeders driving by their house than they are of the gang related shooting a few blocks away. You'll do more for crime, and get more accolades from citizens and admin when you pull over those speeders, vs. looking for the gang banger carrying the gun.

                            I enjoy the look I get when I say this. It's really to bad it takes 5-7 years for that lesson to be learned.

                            This is true. Whenever I had to go to a community council meeting no one ever brought up the latest robbery or burglary pattern. All the complaints were centered around parking and traffic issues.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MIDWAY View Post
                              I tell the rookies; Your average citizen is more vehemently concerned with the speeders driving by their house than they are of the gang related shooting a few blocks away.
                              Or at least it's that way until those citizens get pulled over themselves for speeding.
                              This Space For Rent

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