Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Very sad accidental police shooting situation in NY

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Very sad accidental police shooting situation in NY

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2014...uses-nypd-says

    Rookie Officer Fatally Shoots 'Total Innocent' in Pink Houses, NYPD Says

    EAST NEW YORK — A rookie police officer fatally shot an unarmed man late Thursday in a "pitch black" Pink Houses stairwell as his girlfriend, whom he had been visiting, watched in horror, officials and a witness said.

    Officer Peter Liang, who had been working in the field since graduating the police academy in January, had his flashlight and gun out when the weapon "accidentally discharged," hitting Akai Gurley who was "a total innocent," NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton said.

    Liang, 27, and his partner were doing a top-to-bottom patrol in the stairwell of 2724 Linden Blvd., near Eldert Lane, about 11:15 p.m. when they reached an eighth-floor landing — where the lights had been out for "possibly days," Bratton said.

    At the same time, 28-year-old Gurley, the father of a two-year-old, was entering the stairwell from the floor below them and started them, sources and witnesses said.

    Gurley and his girlfriend, 27-year-old Melissa Butler, had tried to take the elevator but opted for the stairs when it didn't come, she said. Butler entered first and Gurley followed right behind, she said.

    "As soon as he came in, the police opened the [door to the] eighth-floor staircase," Butler told DNAinfo New York.

    "They didn't present themselves or nothing and shot him. They didn't identify themselves at all. They just shot."

    Liang, who along with this partner had been part of an increased police presence in the Pink Houses because of high crime rates in the area, fired a single shot that hit Gurley in the chest, police said.

    The officers then retreated and Liang radioed in to say that there had been an accidental shooting, sources said.

    The couple then started running down the stairs after the shooting, but Gurley only made it to the fifth floor. Butler ran one floor below and asked neighbors for help, she said.

    She then ran back up to her boyfriend and tried to revive him while 911 dispatchers talked her through first aid procedures until medical crews arrived, Bratton said.

    "They brought him down the elevator on a stretcher. He was naked, all you saw was his boxers and a hole on the right side of his chest. It was really small. One guy was doing chest compressions, but his eyes were closed. He was gone," said neighbor Tamia Davis, 32.

    Gurley was pronounced dead at Brookdale Hospital, police said.

    Gurley had been dating Butler since about 2012, she said. He was at the gym earlier Thursday night and had come to visit her about 9:15 p.m., she said. Neighbors saw her braiding his hair in the hallway before he was shot.

    "He was a good person. He was into making music and helping people that were struggling. He would give money if you needed it. He'd give you advice," she said.

    When asked how she was coping with the loss of her boyfriend, Butler replied simply, "I'm going through it."

    The Thursday-night shooting echoed a similar 2004 incident in which officers patrolling a Bedford-Stuyvesant public housing building fatally shot 19-year-old Timothy Stansbury Jr. as he tried to exit a stairwell.

    The officer involved in that shooting, Richard Neri, who also had his gun draw while on patrol, said he accidentally fired after being startled by the young man on the roof of the Brooklyn project. He was not indicted.

    On Thursday night, Officer Liang also had his gun drawn along with his flashlight, Bratton said.

    "We leave that decision, as to whether to draw the weapon, to the discretion of the officers based on what they're encountering or what they believe they may be encountering," Bratton said.

    Liang and his partner, whose identity was not immediately released, were taken to Jamaica Hospital and treated for tinnitus, NYPD officials said.

    Liang, a Brooklyn resident, was placed on modified duty without his gun and badge, officials said.

    Mayor Bill de Blasio called Gurley's death "a tragic accident" and joined other city leaders in calling for a comprehensive investigation.

    "This is a tragedy. A life was lost," de Blasio said, adding, "There's going to be a full investigation to say the least."

    "Many questions must be answered, including whether, as reported, the lights in the hallway were out for a number of days, and how this tragedy actually occurred," Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson said.

    The police department's internal affairs bureau is also investigating the shooting, an NYPD spokeswoman said.

    The New York City Housing Authority, which maintains the Pink Houses, declined to comment because of the ongoing investigation.

    Former City Councilman Charles Barron, who used to represent the neighborhood, faulted the rookie officer for the shooting and said it echoed fatal police shootings on Staten Island and in Ferguson, Mo.

    "This young man should still be alive today," Barron said outside the Pink Houses Friday morning. "This is madness. It must stop. People are outraged. This is happening all over the country."

    Residents of the housing project, considered one of the roughest in the city, said that the hallways are often dark, but they were fixed soon after the shooting.

    "They fixed the [the lights] immediately, like after it happened," said James Esquilin, 25, who lives on the same floor as Butler. "Mr. Charles Barron was here so they came and did a couple of fixtures. It shouldn't have to take for Mr. Barron to come down for you to fix stuff. We pay rent here. We live here. We got children here."

  • #2
    Yes, this is terribly sad. But I would like to give the NYPD some credit for honestly admitting it was a mistake and apologizing for it. The citizens can't say there is any appearance of a cover up or any similar such thing. I feel bad for the officer and the family of the victim.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hate to say it but I suspect criminal charges will be filed on the Officer..
      Retired LASD

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Retired96 View Post
        Hate to say it but I suspect criminal charges will be filed on the Officer..
        Hah, with a Brooklyn grand jury? That wouldn't surprise me in the least.
        sigpic
        __________________

        "I pity guys like you, I truly do. Everything you own and have you can thank the job for and still you despise it. I don't understand how any man can choose a career, hate it from the beginning, not have the balls to leave, and then complain about it once he's retired."

        -Thee Rant (surprisingly)
        __________________

        Originally posted by NYCTNT
        DF,

        Why do you bother?

        Comment


        • #5
          I bet it wasn't accidental as the story said but more reactionary on the officer's part. I'm sure it was drummed into the boot not to have his finger in the trigger unless he was ready to destroy something. I'm sure his finger was in the trigger for a reason. Sad any way you look at it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I seriously doubt we are getting the whole story.
            Originally posted by Ceridwen
            Just one would be stingy of me, I'd have to get two. For the children.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dontknowwhy View Post
              I seriously doubt we are getting the whole story.
              True. But, the fact that the officer radioed it in as an accidental doesn't make it sound good. It sounds like bad trigger discipline.


              It really sucks that this one round happened to hit vitals and take the young man's life. Then you have idiots like this take multiple rounds with minimal effect (my lord, does glass dampen handgun round energy):

              http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=50c_1416494823

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dontknowwhy View Post
                I seriously doubt we are getting the whole story.
                In the article, the former City Councilman was quoted:

                "This young man should still be alive today. This is madness. It must stop. People are outraged. This is happening all over the country."

                No, it's not madness. Whether this was an "accidental discharge" or not: such things are part of the total cost of having a law enforcement agency, are they not? A certain amount of accidents, mishaps, screw-ups will happen: why can't the public accept that? Perhaps because we are taught a competing narrative that makes us feel better: that there is NO COST to running a law enforcement agency (beyond the tax dollars spent on it).
                https://www.thereligionofpeace.com/TROP.jpg

                List of Islamic terror attacks in the last 30 days

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Max K View Post
                  In the article, the former City Councilman was quoted:

                  "This young man should still be alive today. This is madness. It must stop. People are outraged. This is happening all over the country."

                  No, it's not madness. Whether this was an "accidental discharge" or not: such things are part of the total cost of having a law enforcement agency, are they not? A certain amount of accidents, mishaps, screw-ups will happen: why can't the public accept that? Perhaps because we are taught a competing narrative that makes us feel better: that there is NO COST to running a law enforcement agency (beyond the tax dollars spent on it).

                  It is also inevitable due to there being well over 300,000,000 people in the U.S. to police. I think we're doing a good job with the number of cops to citizen ratio.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Max K View Post
                    In the article, the former City Councilman was quoted:

                    "This young man should still be alive today. This is madness. It must stop. People are outraged. This is happening all over the country."
                    That former City Councilman is Chuckie Barron....he is a perp and Black Panther....that is the real "madness". NYC gets what it deserves.
                    September 11, 2001 - All gave some, some gave all. Never forget -- Never forgive.......... RIP Brothers and Sisters.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      NYC Housing projects have some of the highest crime rates in the city. The stairwells in particular are very dangerous. Used by drug dealers to ply their trade most light bulbs are broken by dealers as soon as they're replaced. Also used by addicts and homeless they are strewn with garbage, feces( both human and animal), urine, used hypodermic needles and other drug paraphernalia making a trip and fall the most common injury. The retraction springs on the doors are usually bent (by dealers) so that when pushed open too far and (or) too fast the door will snap back and hit you in the face. This is done to slow down pursuing cops. Any NYC cop who has chased someone into these stairwells have seen how the bad guys breeze through a partially opened door just enough for his body to fit and when the cop hits it, BAM! Stopped cold. Definitely a practiced escape technique. Many cops have their guns drawn when they enter these stairwells because they are drug and robbery prone locations. Some guys before entering will turn their radio up so the sound carries to scare off any potential problems. You can hear the scurrying. A physical confrontation in any stairwell is dangerous because getting pushed down a flight of stairs can cause serious long term injury or death. I know a few cops that were permanently injured during confrontations on stairwells. Cautious about going into NYC housing project stairwells? I never met any cop of any amount of experience who wasn't.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Very sad accidental police shooting situation in NY

                        Originally posted by Max K View Post
                        In the article, the former City Councilman was quoted:

                        [COLOR="#800000"]No, it's not madness. Whether this was an "accidental discharge" or not: such things are part of the total cost of having a law enforcement agency, are they not? A certain amount of accidents, mishaps, screw-ups will happen: why can't the public accept that? Perhaps because we are taught a competing narrative that makes us feel better: that there is NO COST to running a law enforcement agency (beyond the tax dollars spent on it).
                        No. No. Again, no. Anything over zero percent accidents is a totally unacceptable rate when it comes to firearms or any other deadly force, especially when it comes to members of a profession who rightly should be held to exceptionally high standards of proficiency and judgement.
                        Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                        I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ateamer View Post
                          No. No. Again, no. Anything over zero percent accidents is a totally unacceptable rate when it comes to firearms or any other deadly force, especially when it comes to members of a profession who rightly should be held to exceptionally high standards of proficiency and judgement.
                          I think cops are required to think that way. I guess I was looking at it more from a philosophical point of view: I believe that thousands of people die in America every year due to "preventable medical errors" made by doctors. I am sure the doctors themselves consider such medical errors unacceptable, but they will continue to happen and thousands of people will die from those medical errors, not because there is anything wrong with the training or procedures, but simply because of the difficulty of practicing medicine: in addition to the basic difficulty of the task, I'm sure there are added difficulties, such as: not enough doctors, too many patients, legal constraints, which sometimes incentivize defensive medicine, where treatment decisions are made based on the probability of future lawsuits, rather than on what is best for the health of the patient. Is it not similar in the law enforcement profession?
                          https://www.thereligionofpeace.com/TROP.jpg

                          List of Islamic terror attacks in the last 30 days

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There is a chasm of difference between a doctor not correctly diagnosing an illness or misprescribing drugs. They have to correctly read symptoms that may well represent multiple conditions, take the patient's word as truth for much of their history, and pick the correct drugs that won't cause problems with whatever other drugs the patient is taking.

                            Medicine is far more complex than finger off the trigger and out of the trigger guard until you are on target and have made the decision to use deadly force. Preventing unintentionally shooting someone is remarkably simple.
                            Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                            I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As someone with a foot in each profession, I'll chime in here.

                              Max K hit the nail on the head when it comes to the medical profession. I often draw comparisons between the two. However, there is a difference between a reasonable error made in a dynamic situation with the information that is available at the time versus an avoidable error that should not happen. Both can have tragic consequences, but one is understandable. Lack of trigger discipline resulting in the death of an uninvolved person would be more similar to someone going under anesthesia for a minor procedure, but ends up having the wrong procedure performed and dying from the complications. These types of errors should not happen.
                              "Respect is earned. Honesty is appreciated. Trust is gained. Loyalty is returned."

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 2981 users online. 152 members and 2829 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X