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ACLU going after "Stingrays"

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  • ACLU going after "Stingrays"

    The ACLU has a hard-on for these cell phone detection devices.

    https://www.aclu.org/node/37337

    Not too familiar with them. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    Originally posted by MatthewSmith View Post
    The ACLU has a hard-on for these cell phone detection devices.

    https://www.aclu.org/node/37337

    Not too familiar with them. Any thoughts?
    They swim very gracefully.
    September 11, 2001 - All gave some, some gave all. Never forget -- Never forgive.......... RIP Brothers and Sisters.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by So Fla Cop View Post
      They swim very gracefully.
      Ha!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MatthewSmith View Post
        The ACLU has a hard-on for these cell phone detection devices.

        https://www.aclu.org/node/37337

        Not too familiar with them. Any thoughts?
        If they are constitutional why is such an effort being made to conceal things?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
          If they are constitutional why is such an effort being made to conceal things?
          Really?
          September 11, 2001 - All gave some, some gave all. Never forget -- Never forgive.......... RIP Brothers and Sisters.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by So Fla Cop View Post
            They swim very gracefully.
            I'm sure Steve Irwin would say the same.

            Comment


            • #7
              The ACLU supports big government then doesn't like big government. What a bunch of idiots.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by So Fla Cop View Post
                Really?
                Are you denying that there is an effort to keep them out of the public eye and the courtroom???

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
                  Are you denying that there is an effort to keep them out of the public eye and the courtroom???
                  No. Not at all.
                  September 11, 2001 - All gave some, some gave all. Never forget -- Never forgive.......... RIP Brothers and Sisters.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I once almost bought a 1976 Corvette Stingray............................I never thought it would be unconstitutional.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here is an American Clam Lover Union member (in disguise) going after a stingray...

                      September 11, 2001 - All gave some, some gave all. Never forget -- Never forgive.......... RIP Brothers and Sisters.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What the X? Why would anyone suppose that a publicly available data transmission device location would or should be reliably secret? You're broadcasting from a single location, which means you can be found pretty much anywhere by pretty much anyone -- e.g. David Pogue gets his stolen phone back. Why should the ACLU be upset that the Police can do it too? If you want your location to be secret use a relay.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
                          If they are constitutional why is such an effort being made to conceal things?
                          Records of intelligence information, security procedures and investigative methods of law enforcement agencies have traditionally been exempt from public disclosure laws.

                          Were this information to be made public, criminals would use it to find ways to circumvent police investigations, keep from being arrested and continue committing crimes.

                          Disclosing such information makes as much sense as putting signs like this on the cars of undercover cops.

                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Were this information to be made public, criminals would use it to find ways to circumvent police investigations, keep from being arrested and continue committing crimes."

                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                            Exactly!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
                              What the X? Why would anyone suppose that a publicly available data transmission device location would or should be reliably secret? You're broadcasting from a single location, which means you can be found pretty much anywhere by pretty much anyone -- e.g. David Pogue gets his stolen phone back. Why should the ACLU be upset that the Police can do it too? If you want your location to be secret use a relay.
                              I think some might argue that: 1.) The common cell phone user does not understand the concept of "broadcasting" and 2.) That people opt-in to services like "Find my iPhone" and are the sole authorizer in locating their missing equipment —*they don't expect police to surreptitiously spy on all cell phones within a certain area en masse in order to find the proverbial bad guy "needle" in an otherwise innocuous haystack.

                              On the other hand, there's an argument to be made that people who use the public airwaves are no different from police who use the public airwaves — police scanners are made public, so why shouldn't cell phone signals? Also, the StingRays seem to only collect metadata, the same stuff you'd see on your phone bill, not the actual contents of calls. Why wouldn't you want your local police department to have a tool that can hunt down bad guys, especially if the metadata is not terribly invasive?

                              The notion that bad guys might alter their activities if more is known about these devices might be valid — after all, the government claims terrorists have modified their communication techniques post-Snowden, making it really difficult to track people who want to do harm to our citizens. It's also hard to argue against the idea that the government is a little too quick to blanket anything it doesn't want publicly known as a "homeland security" issue.

                              Verdict: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

                              Comment

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