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Off Duty extra jobs

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  • Off Duty extra jobs

    If you choose to take an extra job for some extra cash. Working some kind of event doing security. In plain clothes cause obviously if you are in uniform you will have your duty weapon but if you are in plain clothes would you carry a personally owned firearm or your duty weapon? and if you choose a personally owned firearm what would that be?

  • #2
    Check your policy book, or ask administration.

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    • #3
      I would carry a weapon I am qualified with and is within Policy.

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      • #4
        Once more, I commend a Poster to the replies of my colleagues. 100% good information. Please allow me to add this. Many agencies (mine included) severely limit or restrict both the type of work, and the hours an Officer can work off-duty.

        So, if you're an Officer, you would do well to know your particular department's policy(s) with regard to off-duty employment. These policies often vary widely.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zigziggityzoo View Post
          Check your policy book, or ask administration.

          Re read this answer....................three times
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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          • #6
            We are prohibited from using issued duty gear and firearms for off duty employment. An "extra job" is not the same thing as an overtime detail.

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            • #7
              Any job that is extra duty must be done through the department for insurance purposes, which means you're technically on duty. A side job is forbidden unless approved by the chief.
              Being a good street cop is like coming to work in a wet suit and peeing in your pants. It's a nice warm feeling, but you're the only one who knows anything has happened.

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              • #8
                Around here officers that work off duty security gigs can use their uniforms, issued firearms and take home cars.

                There are even provisions for retired officers to be issued credentials and still work in uniform. These things vary from department to department and state to state.

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                • #9
                  We are nearly forbidden from working off-duty law enforcement related employment (includes security) in plain clothes. There are very few exceptions, which are pre-approved by the dept. and only come about from time to time.

                  I work a regular off-duty job and am required to meet all regular duty uniform requirements, including grooming standards (shaving), and regular duty belt setup.
                  "No one can make you feel like a turd without your permission." - Eleanor Roosevelt.

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                  • #10
                    Another One Of My Longwinded Posts

                    FWIW, I refused to work private off duty security jobs. Instead, I only worked jobs where the person seeking coverage contracted with the department for an off duty officer to work the assignment as an official, on duty overtime assignment. Here’s why:

                    If I got injured working an on duty overtime assignment, I got paid 100% of my full salary, tax free for up to a year while I recovered and the department paid my medical bills. OTOH, if I was injured while being paid by Joe’s grocery store to provide security, and Joe’s had worker’s comp coverage, I might get a couple bucks from them while I recovered but would have to supplement that with sick leave from the police department not only to get by, but to cover my absence from the PD while I couldn’t work. If Joe’s had no worker’s comp insurance and insisted I was an independent contractor, I would have to rely solely on my sick leave from the PD. Once my leave credits ran out, my PD would have to medically terminate me if I was unfit to return to duty.

                    If I got injured working an on duty overtime assignment, my department paid 100% of my medical bills. OTOH, if I work for Joe’s and he does not have worker’s comp and insists I am an independent contractor, I have to pay for my medical treatment out of my own pocket.

                    If while working an overtime assignment, I was injured to the point that I could never perform the duties of a police officer again, I would get a very nice, tax free disability pension for the rest of my life. If while moonlighting for Joe’s, I was injured to the point that I could never perform the duties of a police officer again, it would be the same as if I was disabled while trimming trees at my house. I would simply be deemed medically unfit for duty while engaged in a matter unrelated to my department duties and terminated. Now I would be disabled, unemployed with no pension and unemployable. Joe’s would have no obligation to care for me financially for the rest of my life like the PD would with a disability pension.

                    If I were to be sued as the result of an on duty overtime event, as a matter of law the PD would be obliged to defend me in court, pay all awards for actual damages and at their discretion, could pay awards for punitive damages. If you got sued over something you did while being paid by Joe’s, you are on the hook to pay for your own attorney and any damage awards.

                    Finally, if I were charged criminally due to something that arose criminally during the scope of my overtime assignment duties, as a matter of law, the PD would be obliged to provide me with a criminal defense. If the same thing were to happen while you are being paid by Joe’s, you are on the hook to pay for your own defense.

                    The key is, don’t take any enforcement or security jobs unless they are contracted through the department and your agency deems you to be on duty and acting within the scope and course of your regular employment as a peace officer. To moonlight on your own poses too many financial, medical and legal risks.
                    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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