Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

This couldn't have been fun to witness....

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • This couldn't have been fun to witness....

    Police Officer Facing Arrest on Battery, Misconduct Charges Fatally Shoots Himself
    The Associated Press
    Published: Jun 24, 2001

    MELBOURNE, Fla. (AP) - A city police officer facing charges of misconduct and battery fatally shot himself in the chest as fellow officers tried to arrest him.
    Larry Simpson, 47, shot himself in his car Saturday near an intersection lined with officers waiting to catch him. Deputies who went to Simpson's home that morning to arrest him found him at a nearby residence, prompting him to flee in the car, Melbourne Police Deputy Chief Jim Reynolds said.

    Simpson was pronounced dead at Holmes Regional Medical Center, officials said.

    The 14-year veteran was accused of attacking a man he arrested in April during a criminal traffic offense. Simpson was suspended with pay during the investigation.

    Simpson, who denied using excessive force, was charged with official misconduct for filing a false report on the traffic incident, Reynolds said.

    Simpson had agreed to turn himself in earlier this week but missed several appointments to do so, Brevard County Sheriff Phil Williams said.

    AP-ES-06-24-01 0033EDT



    ------------------
    "You're never beaten until you admit it." --Gen. George S. Patton

  • #2
    Suicide claims another. How sad these stories make me.
    "The streets of Philadelphia are safe...it's the people that make them unsafe"---Frank Rizzo
    http://hometown.aol.com/ppd9886/PhillyCopSpot.html

    Comment


    • #3
      There are probably people who think he really did what the article said he did or he wouldn't have chosen such a drastic solution but that isn't necessarily true. Sometimes people reach a breaking point and suicide seems to be the only solution. It just seems there should have been someone who could have helped him.

      Comment


      • #4
        This could go back to the problem with IA's. If your in an IA your not allowed to talk about it to anyone. Here's the problem. Many cops have only other cops as friends. If you cant vent to them, then how can you cope with the incident. IA's usually are never good (although I havent been in one) but I know that there must be alot of stress on a person, when they arent allowed to talk to anyone. For that matter, most people invloved in an ongoing IA are treated like they have the plague.
        As my friend says: All Narc, No Bite

        Comment


        • #5
          k9medic,
          There's a great deal of wisdom in that post. By the time you're in a situation like this--it's do or die time. But all of the moments that lead up to it are lonely (and often disgraced) moments.
          Internal Affairs has a job to do, but there really should be more support given to officers under investigation (whether they did the deed or not) because it really stigmatizes them and because if the investigation does not clear them--there'll be a mighty tough row to hoe afterwards.

          ------------------
          "You're never beaten until you admit it." --Gen. George S. Patton

          Comment


          • #6
            I've been in IA. Probably about seven times. But be aware, it was mostly routine, I have never been charged with misconduct. No offense to anyone in particular, but many cops think that IA is nothing more than pencil pushers that mess with cops because they can't get on the street and do it themselves. I really don't see how a cop would want an assignment like that. I'm sure that there are many professional IA out there, but I still can't see me doing it.

            Comment


            • #7
              It is terrible that a situation will get to such a stage that the only way of resolving it is by committing suicide. A person who commits suicide suffers for a short time. (I don't mean the suffering leading up to the suicide), but the suffering of those loved ones left behind can go on for years. I feel great sorrow for his friends and family.

              ------------------
              We are the Police! Resistance is Futile!
              "Minds are like parachutes. They only function when they are open." Sir James Dewar 1842-1923

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by goodside:
                No offense to anyone in particular, but many cops think that IA is nothing more than pencil pushers that mess with cops because they can't get on the street and do it themselves. I really don't see how a cop would want an assignment like that.
                As I understand it, most of them don't want the assignment. Politics (as in, interdepartmental) plays a big role in appointing many officers into IA. If you get sideways with someone who has the power to put you there, and then start ranking -- it's a good bet they'll use the opportunity to show you "what's what".

                Still, there's a need for IA (unfortunately) and it's a low-down (read: incredibly unpopular) job, but somebody's got to do it - and do it well, I might add. I don't really want officers operating from behind the badge if they're going to misuse the power that comes with it. But more importantly, I don't want their actions to dishonor the department and the officers that are a credit to that badge.

                Still, family is family. I think it'd be a fine idea, to start giving a bit more consideration to those under investgation, even if they're under the gun for misconduct. If the investigation yeilds a guilty assessment--that officer is facing some pretty rough consequences. The idea of having to face that disgrace to their fellow officers, department, community, family, and themselves... That's a lot of pressure, even if you're guilty.
                It might help them to be better prepared for the possibility if there were a policy, making it mandatory for them to routinely communicate with a departmental psychologist throughout the investigation.
                I don't know, something like that anyway...

                ------------------
                "You're never beaten until you admit it." --Gen. George S. Patton

                Comment


                • #9
                  I basically agree. I have been a part of two IAs, both for garbage complaints by inmates while I was in the jail. It was during these moments that I couldn't believe what a waste of time IA is. It is almost as if we are guilty until we prove ourselves innocent. Luckily, however, most of our IA investigators are able to sift the legit complaints out of the great barrel of ridiculous ones.

                  I certainly see the need for them, but I definitely wouldn't want the job.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know some OK IA guys. They have a job to do y'know. I consider myself to be honest, but I don't think that I would lose sleep over lying to them if I knew I was in the right. Cops that take money, deal dope, and use their authority to promote crime are ****bags and should be dealt with. Other than that IA ought to be a very small, unintrusive, never heard from. little bureau in the PD. Policing the police, but who polices them? Non-sworn bureaucrats that's who. Someone who gives the order to investigate officer such and such because their nephew got insulted or arrested, or some female communicator who is sleeping with the whole deptartment can make the rediculous complaint of sexual harassment. Most of you who know me know that I don't engage in soapbox so I'll stop.
                    I will state simply that IA is out of control in most major US cities becuase of liability concerns, almost to the point where a cop is scared to do his/her sworn job. How much is enough?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just heard on the evening news that the NAACP is investigating the PD. The day Simpson killed himself, he mailed a letter to them saying that he is constantly under investigation for one thing or another.

                      ------------------
                      FLLawdog
                      "Never try to teach a pig to sing...it wastes your time and it annoys the pig."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The NAACP investigating the PD, eh? Hey, good luck getting people to "open up" to those publicity hungry, extreme leftist, rebel without a clue, attorneys without a court order and threat of imprisonment.

                        Still, the old cry of "persecution" isn't exactly rare when officers are found guilty of misconduct, meaning that there are usually several complaints lodged against them - few of which ever warrant such devastating findings.

                        ------------------
                        "You're never beaten until you admit it." --Gen. George S. Patton

                        Comment

                        MR300x250 Tablet

                        Collapse

                        What's Going On

                        Collapse

                        There are currently 3822 users online. 167 members and 3655 guests.

                        Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                        Welcome Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X