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  • Ghost Soldiers

    I am reading the MOST amazing book called "Ghost Soldiers". It is about the American Rangers who saved the men that survived the Bataan Death March.
    Whet those men went through in captivity was sheer hell on earth. Some of it bought tears to my eyes. My Father is a World War II veteran and I kept thinking of how hard it would be for me to know he'd had to be there. He was not in the Battaan Death March. We know very little about his experience because he won't talk about it and we don't press the issue. My uncle did tell me that my Father's best friend died in his arms. My poor Dad.
    This book really is amazing. Such brave men they were!
    When I was in high school, a lot of my friends went to Viet Nam. My husband was high enough in the lottery, he didn't have to go. But, I lost many friends over there, both through death and psychological problems. It never hit me until my own son turned 18 just HOW young my friends were and what their parents went through. Such young men. It's heartbreaking to realize what they and their families went through.....in any war.
    If you get a chance, read this book. It is really amazing.

  • #2
    I have several uncles that are WW II veterans. To me it is unbelievable the sacrifices that they made. They essentially had their whole life put on hold for several yearsand they saw and experienced things that were nightmarish to say the least.

    Most of my uncles fought in Europe. One of them, my Uncle John, was an Army paratrooper. I remember when I was about 13 or 14 years old going to his house one day with my grandfather. My uncle was very quiet which was unusual for him and I saw that he had layed out pictures on the kitchen table. Due to his behavior, my grandfather stayed in the living room with my aunt and me. He said "John's in one of his moods" and my aunt just nodded. A little while later my uncle called me into the kitchen and my grandfather and I both went. My uncle then said, "I think it's time you see this" to which my grandfather said "Me too".

    On the table were literally hundreds of photographs from the war. They showed a much younger version of my uncle than I could have ever imagined. They showed a look in his eyes that I can't describe. Other photos showed people that he served with. Many of whom never made it home. Many of whom he stayed in touch with.

    The photographs that have stayed with me the most were from the end of the war. They were taken at a concentration camp that was being liberated.(not sure which one) The looks on those faces are unlike anything I have ever seen before or since. A mix of sheer horror and elation. There were also photographs of piles and piles of bodies.

    When I was older I got to actually sit down with my uncle and we talked about that day. He told me that he hadn't planned to show me the pictures that day but that when we had gotten to his house it just seemed to be the right thing to do. He also told me a lot of stories about the war and what he had experienced. He told me that he had taken the photographs because he thought no one who didn't serve would ever believe what he had seen.

    I am eternally grateful that he did this. It was a far better experience than reading a history book or watching a documentary. It also made me appreciate my uncle ( as well as my other uncles) as someone more than just my uncle. It gave me a whole new view of him.

    He also seemed to feel that while he had been through some tough situations, he had it better than anybody who served in the Pacific Theatre.

    I have two Uncles that served in the Pacific. One was in the Navy and while he doesn't talk much about his service he will on occassion or if he is asked. The other was a Marine and will not mention it. I have seen him go so far as to walk out of a room if anything about WW II is even mentioned on television. He also gets quite moody when this happens. Everyone in the family knows that this is a taboo subject so it is never brought up.

    In God we trust, all others are run MILES and NCIC.

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    • #3
      Hello Mitzi,

      I know what you mean and i understand your fathers situation. Cause i am in that war. Not in Vietnam but in WAR which is still going little in my country Turkey. I was in the East side of Turkey when i was 22 and lost 6 friends of mine there. The WAR between Turkish Army and Kurd illegal terrorist group PKK.(i am sorry MODERATORS, if i am talking politically)
      Now i am 26 and still seeing bad dreams about that. I lost my 6 great friends and cries too much. Thats why i joined the Police Forces. I want to "stop" (i know i cant) these things all over the world and bring order and peace. Thats the 1st reason. The second reason is I feel responsible about my friends death. Why they die? Why not me? Why god chooses not to take me? What did i do? These are really hard questions. And i am still looking to find the answer. Mitzi; i really really understand your father. Its very hard to live with it. I am trying to do that.

      ------------------
      Stay Safe,
      Turk-CoP

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      • #4
        Mitzi,

        Today i look my old army pictures. And i remember those days and cry for my lost 6 friends. I am thinking of them. Where did you find this topic?

        ------------------
        Stay Safe,
        Turk-CoP

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