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  • Question for you Health Nuts

    I've recently taken a job that does not allow me to get ANY exercise while at work and has also prevented me from getting to the gym as much as I used too. As a result, I'm getting FAT. . .at least that

  • #2
    What most experts recommend is eating a meal high in protein about an hour before you excercise. This basically gives you fuel and provides nutrients to your muscles when it needs it most (during the workout).

    What you eat is an entirely different ballgame.. There are so many types of diets.. low carb, high protein, low fat, high carb etc.. Personally, I eat low carb and high protein but that may not work for you. It all depends on your metabolism and so forth.
    No partner is worth your tears -
    the one that is won't make you cry. - Anonymous

    <a href="http://www.renderosity.com/gallery.ez?Form.SortOrder=UserName&Start=1&Artist= Raychel&ByArtist=Yes" target="_blank">My Photo Gallery</a>

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    • #3
      There is a multitude of information out there (much of it conflicting--as you will see here ) about what to eat and when to eat it. You should try to eat as little as possible before a workout (300-500 calories max), since you want your body's energy to go toward the workout and not the digestion process. I believe that carbs are best here because they are digested and metbolized the quickest. You should also eat it two to three hours before your workout, allowing time for most of the nutrients to be digested. You don't HAVE to eat a pre-workout meal though, there are a great deal of experts out there who believe in 'training hungry.' It's also a good idea to eat some protein (ie. protein bar or shake) after a workout to ensure that muscle gains can be realized. IMO, the post-workout meal is the most important meal of the day.

      I don't see why protein would be required before exercise, since the actual process of muscle building doesn't occur until after the exercise has been completed. Protein doesn't fuel muscles, ATP does. Also, protein is the slowest of the three types of nutrients to digest. There is no way that it could be digested and converted into ATP in only an hour.

      As to the fad diets, my advice would be to skip them and eat a diet that consists of 10-20% fat (cut out trans and saturated fats as much as you can), 20-30% protein, and 40-60% carbohydrates. This is along the lines of what the USDA Food Pyramid recommends. In light of the recent developments in regards to carbs, it is wise to eliminate simple carbohydrates (sugars, enriched flour, etc.) from your diet as much as possible.

      The basic rule is that to lose weight, you must burn more calories than you consume. As long as you limit your food intake, you should be fine. If you are used to working out a lot and your new job makes it so that you can't do this, it goes without saying that you will gain weight if you don't reduce your calorie intake to make up for the lost exercise.

      [ 11-15-2002, 08:45 PM: Message edited by: PatrickM98 ]

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      • #4
        quote:
        This is along the lines of what the USDA Food Pyramid recommends.
        I disagree with you about the ratio of carbs in your diet.. Y'know, the gov't started pushing this "low-fat" is healthy rhetoric starting back in the 80's which so happens to be high-carb. Since then, we've had the fastest growing epidemic of obesity. Coincidence? I think not.

        Many people who are overweight, are so because of either metabolic disorders such as insulin troubles or because of food allergies/addictions. The culprit? Carbohydrates. I know you posted to avoid simple carbs but I still think the 40-60% ratio you posted is counterproductive and detrimental.

        [ 11-16-2002, 09:26 AM: Message edited by: RachelR ]
        No partner is worth your tears -
        the one that is won't make you cry. - Anonymous

        <a href="http://www.renderosity.com/gallery.ez?Form.SortOrder=UserName&Start=1&Artist= Raychel&ByArtist=Yes" target="_blank">My Photo Gallery</a>

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        • #5
          Not trying to flame PatrickM98 but his concept has gone out of date the past couple of years. I used to agree with not eating before working out and also not having carbs and protein at the same time. BUT as allways things change, go full circle, etc.

          Breakfast is the most important meal of the day because we as humans are designed to burn muscle as a survival mechanisim. That's right, back in the stone age carring around a lot of muscle and weight was not good for swinging from trees and required too may calories to maintain. Therefore if one dosen't get some kind of food every two to three hours ones body goes into catabolic mode and begins to break down muscle. This is why Olympic athletes get up in the middle of the night to have a protein drink. After sleeping eight hours your in big time catabolic mode and that's why you need about 40grams of protein.
          I drink protein for breakfast, mid morning snack, before I work out(half hour prior), after the work out(on workout days) and right before bed.
          .75- 1.0 grams per pound of body weight.

          Low carb diets are fine but you still have to have carbs for the workout. Therefore even while dieting you need a high carb drink before you workout and DEFINATELY immediatley afterward. At least 50grams a 100grams if you did hard cardio.

          I lost 20lbs on this so called "diet" in 12 weeks and kept my strength.

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          • #6
            The original poster wrote that he would be working out very early in the morning. This would seem to prohibit him from eating 1-3 hours before the workout.

            Eating carbs prior to a workout means that he will be using the glucogen from those carbs for energy rather than tapping into his bodyfat.

            I suggest he drink at least 8 ounces of water prior to working out, and then workout without eating.

            This way he will tap into stored BF. Remember that one pound of fat has 3500 calories. Even someone at 170 and 10% BF has 59,500 stored calories of fat!

            Someone at 200 and 16% BF has 112,000 calories of stored fat!

            I agree with Rachel and to a lesser extent, Patrick. Carbs will make you fat, too much saturated fat will clog your arteries and make you dead.

            A balanced diet of no more than 40% carbs with 30% Protein and 30% MONOunsaturated fats will produce tremendous results. This is caloric value, not portion size!

            I will go a step further and say that one should never eat carbs alone. It is a guarantee of fat storeage.

            Also stay away from these carbs as much as possible, as they have the highest glycemic index, meaning they raise your blood glucose levels the fastest; therefore, increasing your insulin response; potatos, rice, bread, corn, bananas, puffed rice, wheat products.
            "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

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            • #7
              then of course you could always be like me...dying with a purpose.

              don't you think all those health nuts are going to feel foolish dying of nothing?
              press hard please,...four copies

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              • #8
                It's not a matter of death, as we will all die. It is a matter of quality of life.
                "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

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                • #9
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by RachelR:
                  the gov't started pushing this "low-fat" is healthy rhetoric starting back in the 80's which so happens to be high-carb. Since then, we've had the fastest growing epidemic of obesity. Coincidence? I think not.

                  Many people who are overweight, are so because of either metabolic disorders such as insulin troubles or because of food allergies/addictions. The culprit? Carbohydrates. I know you posted to avoid simple carbs but I still think the 40-60% ratio you posted is counterproductive and detrimental.

                  First off, just because the food pyramid suggests that one base their diet off of carbs does not mean that most Americans (especially the overweight ones) do this. The problem is not the carbs themselves, but rather the type of carbs eaten. Fruits and vegetables consist mostly of carbs, and nobody will get fat eating a diet rich in those. The problem is when people turn to 'low fat' foods that are basically laden with sugar. Enriched flours that are low in fiber also help to fatten people. The carbs vs. protein/fat debate has research and experts on both sides. It still comes down to the fact that no matter what you eat, if you consume less calories than you expend, you will lose weight.

                  Also, most Americans are overweight simply because they eat too much and don't exercise, not because they have metabolic disorders or food addictions. There was a statistic in my health book that said only 2% of overweight Americans have glanular problems that cannot be overcome by a reduction in caloric intake. So 98% of overweight Americans are to blame for their condition. Sure, some people have lower basal metabolic rates than others, but that just means they need to consume less calories than other people. I don't agree with your 'food addiction' statement at all. I lost close to 90 lbs. since I graduated from high school simply because I decided I didn't want to be overweight anymore. I cut my calories in half and started exercising. Food is not like alcohol or tobacco, there is nothing in it that causes addiction. I'd like to see one study that says food is addictive like drugs are. For someone to say that they're addicted to food just tells me that they don't want to blame themselves for their own condition. They don't eat too much because they are addicted to food, they eat too much because they lack the willpower or desire to eat less.

                  [ 11-16-2002, 07:48 PM: Message edited by: PatrickM98 ]

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                  • #10
                    FWIW. My wife has been involved in Body For Life for over a year.
                    It is a healthy eating and exercise program.
                    www.BodyForLife.com

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                    • #11
                      What works for one doesn't necessarily work for another. It depends on a number of factors including whether you exercise or not and how much.

                      My advice is to always check with your Doc even if you think it might be silly. I had a friend who went on a diet and got into big time health trouble because the diet she was on didn't give her enough fat OR carbs.

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                      • #12
                        quote:
                        Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                        [QB]The original poster wrote that he would be working out very early in the morning. This would seem to prohibit him from eating 1-3 hours before the workout.

                        Eating carbs prior to a workout means that he will be using the glucogen from those carbs for energy rather than tapping into his bodyfat.

                        I suggest he drink at least 8 ounces of water prior to working out, and then workout without eating.

                        ]

                        Unless the guy is getting out of bed, taking a ****, and then walking right to a workout machine they have time to consume a protein beverage and a carb drink while going to the gym.
                        Even if one is working out at home and gets going right after getting out of bed they are only consuming a bev or an apple. That will not cause all the blood to stay in the stomach and leave the muscles. This once popular belief died out in the mid 90's.

                        Yes the carbs eaten prior to a workout will cause them to be used before fat. The question is what do you want out of your workout? Strenth, size, and increased aroebic activity? Or just fat loose? You cannot build size and strength without carbs. That is why lifting workouts should be forty five minutes or less because that is when the carbs usually run out(along with the testosterone level). The only thing fat is used for is cardio. Most carbs are burnt off during hard cardio in the first 20 minutes. If you do the weights first the carbs are gone before cardio. Never do cardio before the weights.

                        If all you care about is fast fat loose then don't take any carbs. If you want to loose a couple of pounds while improving your physical goals then take the carbs when you need them for your workouts and go into carbo debt on your off days and the hours before and after you've worked out.

                        Eating carbs and protein prior to a workout gets the insuline and testosterone levels up creating an anabolic state for muscle growth. After the workout the insuline spike from the after workout carb drink allows the muscles to absorb twice as much protein and carbs. All the things needed for growth and the energy for the next workout. Do an experiment. Workout a few times without an after workout carb drink and then do a few with the afterwork out carb drink and see if there's a difference in your energy level and performance in your next workout. I'll concede that the pre protein drink isn't madatory but after the workout it is.

                        What I've submitted is nothing new and has pretty much been the written about to death in the fitness magazines for the past few years.

                        txinvestigator1 is right in that weightloss or gain is simply a matter of total carlories consumed vs calories expended. Nothing like watching a dispatcher chewing on piece of candy demanding to know what i did to loose weight or claiming that I went to lengthy means or used diet aids. My motto of just "put the cookie down" isn't a big hit with people who eat all day or eat crap all the time.

                        [ 11-17-2002, 01:27 AM: Message edited by: JRT6 ]

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                        • #13
                          JRT6

                          With all due respect, your methods are really the ones outdated. All modern science indicates that the body Will draw glycogen from lipose stores to fuel muscular contraction needed for muscle growth.

                          It is after the workout that protein is needed to rebuild muscular scar tissue created by fatigue of the muscle.

                          You stated that one cannot build strength without carbs. I agree. Carbs should be no more than 40% of the caloric intake, and consumed no sooner than 1 hour prior to a workout at a minimum. And we agree that these carbs should be those of low to moderate glycemic index.

                          I NEVER wrote that weight loss was simply a matter of total calories comsumed vs calories expended. That is much too simple, and on it's face can cause a tremendous loss of lean muscle, creating a higher BF content and less effecient and healthy body.

                          I do admit that my information is NOT for body builders, as the stress they place on their systems require a very specialized program.

                          I also agree with you that Cardio should be done after anerobic exercise, if they must be done on the same day.

                          My bottom line; eat a 40/30/30 balanced diet. Never consume carbs alone. Stay away from high glycemic carbs and saturated fats. Try to eat no sooner than one hour prior to a workout. Also remember that after a good anerobic workout your body will really be looking for fuel. Fat is a good source of that fuel. (We easily carry thousands of calories of glycogen in the form of fat). A good source of protein is vital by one hour of that anerobic workout. Figure your protein intake needs by your lean bodyweight and your activity levels. I bet JRT6 and I have way different protein needs. Once the protein need is established, the carb and fat needs can be calculated.

                          Whew!

                          And lets not EVEN get started on supplements; although, I am interested on JRT6's thoughts and advice on the subject.

                          [ 11-17-2002, 02:17 AM: Message edited by: txinvestigator1 ]
                          "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:
                            Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                            I NEVER wrote that weight loss was simply a matter of total calories comsumed vs calories expended. That is much too simple, and on it's face can cause a tremendous loss of lean muscle, creating a higher BF content and less effecient and healthy body.

                            And I'm sure that you know it's quite difficult to lose fat and build muscle at the same time. If you lose fat, you're probably going to lose some muscle too. Weight loss IS a matter of calories consumed vs. calories expended. I'm not suggesting to starve yourself, just to reduce your daily caloric intake by a few hundred calories. Either that, or add a few hundred calories of exercise to your day. If you don't expend more calories than you take in, you're just not going to lose any weight.

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                            • #15
                              Patrick's last post pretty much summed it up. For me, while on a diet, my goal is to minimalize muscle loss. I like to keep my weight in the 230 lb. range and I do this by:

                              1. About 160 grams or so in four double serving protein drinks. The protein I use has Glutamine already in it. Usually a drink in the morning, before and after working out, and prior to bed.

                              2. creatine. The stuff works and my orthopedic surgen suggested the other day that cycling this isn't nessessary. I do anyway. Twelve weeks on, six weeks off.

                              3. Glucosomine: I have athritis.

                              4. 2,700 calories consumed on off days, 3,200 or so on lifting days. Always carb up after workout. I don't obsess over what I eat and will eat most foods even fast food. It's basically teh totality of the calories.

                              5. Cardio three days a week tops.

                              6. Short workouts.

                              7. Generic mulit-vitamin

                              That's it. When I'm not on a body fat adjustment(diet) I eat about 3,200 calories a day. I try to get three double servings of protein somewhere in there.

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