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High speed chases. Are people really this stupid?

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  • High speed chases. Are people really this stupid?

    After a police chase ended in the officer losing control and wrecking his cruiser, four citizens sustained minor injuries.

    Comment boards in the article are polluted with readers whining about how high speed chases shouldn't be allowed because it puts citizens at risk.

    Comment I wrote: "It's rather disturbing that people are complaining that chases should't be allowed because the four people sustained minor injuries...

    Maybe those four people are found dead in their home tonight because officers didn't attempt to chase the guy. Think about that..."

    Anybody have a strong opinion on high-speed chases?

  • #2
    You have to weigh the risk to the public of not stopping the perp against the risk to the public of incenting the perp to drive even crazier due to your chasing him and you have to take into account your having to drive unsafely fast to catch the perp. He can't outrun a radio wave. I say that most of the time you should call in the tag and block him off up ahead.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Matt N View Post
      After a police chase ended in the officer losing control and wrecking his cruiser, four citizens sustained minor injuries.

      Comment boards in the article are polluted with readers whining about how high speed chases shouldn't be allowed because it puts citizens at risk.

      Comment I wrote: "It's rather disturbing that people are complaining that chases should't be allowed because the four people sustained minor injuries...

      Maybe those four people are found dead in their home tonight because officers didn't attempt to chase the guy. Think about that..."

      Anybody have a strong opinion on high-speed chases?
      Sometimes they are not worth the risk

      Comment


      • #4
        Pursuits are governed by two basic considerations. Law, and agency policy. These, especially agency policy, vary widely.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
          Pursuits are governed by two basic considerations. Law, and agency policy. These, especially agency policy, vary widely.
          laws of physics? risks? reasonableness?

          Comment


          • #6
            I look forward to reading your posts, PhilipCal, because you're a smart and experienced person who consistently provides cogent and informative commentary.

            On this one I think you missed the mark a little.

            We must always exercise good judgment in the matter of pursuit.

            It's obvious that there are many things besides man-made rules to take into account.

            I'm sure you figured that was understood, but I'm not so sure about the OP, because I haven't read as many posts from him as I have of yours.

            Comment


            • #7
              Oh and thank you for your 13000+ excellent posts and for the hard and dangerous work that went into your acquisition of all that knowledge.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
                I look forward to reading your posts, PhilipCal, because you're a smart and experienced person who consistently provides cogent and informative commentary.

                On this one I think you missed the mark a little.

                We must always exercise good judgment in the matter of pursuit.

                It's obvious that there are many things besides man-made rules to take into account.

                I'm sure you figured that was understood, but I'm not so sure about the OP, because I haven't read as many posts from him as I have of yours.

                My intent was to be brief, and not write a "dime novel". My Agency allows considerable Officer discretion concerning pursuits. A Trooper may discontinue a pursuit when the possible good to be obtained is outweighed by the risks involved.
                While a supervisor may elect to order a pursuit ended, an individual Trooper choosing to terminate a pursuit cannot be over ruled by the supervisor. That said, many an agency has very restrictive policies, and allows an individual officer little or no discretion in the matter of pursuits. That's why I noted the very wide variances in pursuit policy(s). Thank you for the kind words.

                Comment


                • #9
                  right on sir

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Edit........
                    Last edited by Matt N; 04-29-2014, 02:49 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I rarely read online comments on news sites. Normally the people who comment on those site just don't have a clue & If you read them for very long you will understand what I mean.

                      PhilipCal has given you the facts from a police supervisor's point of view. Over the yrs I have been involved in more than one chase............a couple lasting in excess of 100 miles (needless to say they were rural chases) and some ending within blocks when I realized it was unsafe to continue.

                      I am strongly against blanket "no chase" policies but lean on the "reasonable" policies that allow a commander/officer to terminate. The ability of the commander to terminate the chase is important as he/she is removed from the "excitement" of actually being in the chase.
                      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pursuits are not initiated by the LE agency involved; they are initiated by the person the LE agency is trying to stop.

                        There is a need to pursue and there is policy in place to discontinue the pursuit - either by the officer or a supervisor.


                        LEOs utilize as much care and safety as is available to make the pursuit as safe as possible. The suspect dictates the speed, direction, locale, etc. The suspect is not bound by certain specifics other than it is unlawful to fail to stop on direction. LEOs are bound by law, agency SOP, common sense, training, discipline, integrity, etc. LEOs are equipped with emergency equipment - emergency lights and sirens. They are highly trained for the discipline.

                        The motoring public fails to pay attention to their driving. They are distracted by their music, cellphones, passengers, business of the day, or personal problems. Hence, their failure to adequately observe the conditions surrounding them, the traffic, the environment, the lighting, the overall, general flow of traffic.

                        When a number of factors come together, in the confusion, accidents happen. They are generally found to be preventable and, regretably, innocent people are injured or killed.

                        But, the fact remains that if the suspect was compliant, the incident would not have happened. The suspect is ultimaely responsible and in most cases, when taken into custody, is properly charged for the criminal charges permitted by law. Some criminal charges are 2nd degree murder, manslaughter, reckless driving, felony evasion, felony DUI, etc. The suspects are generally: unlicensed, suspended, revoked, in a stolen vehicle, under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol, wanted for another crime, or parole violators. Good people do not cause pursuits!
                        Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                        [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Matt N View Post
                          After a police chase ended in the officer losing control and wrecking his cruiser, four citizens sustained minor injuries.

                          Comment boards in the article are polluted with readers whining about how high speed chases shouldn't be allowed because it puts citizens at risk.

                          Comment I wrote: "It's rather disturbing that people are complaining that chases should't be allowed because the four people sustained minor injuries...

                          Maybe those four people are found dead in their home tonight because officers didn't attempt to chase the guy. Think about that..."

                          Anybody have a strong opinion on high-speed chases?
                          What would your opinion be if four people had been killed instead of injured?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SgtCHP View Post
                            Pursuits are not initiated by the LE agency involved; they are initiated by the person the LE agency is trying to stop.

                            There is a need to pursue and there is policy in place to discontinue the pursuit - either by the officer or a supervisor.


                            LEOs utilize as much care and safety as is available to make the pursuit as safe as possible. The suspect dictates the speed, direction, locale, etc. The suspect is not bound by certain specifics other than it is unlawful to fail to stop on direction. LEOs are bound by law, agency SOP, common sense, training, discipline, integrity, etc. LEOs are equipped with emergency equipment - emergency lights and sirens. They are highly trained for the discipline.

                            The motoring public fails to pay attention to their driving. They are distracted by their music, cellphones, passengers, business of the day, or personal problems. Hence, their failure to adequately observe the conditions surrounding them, the traffic, the environment, the lighting, the overall, general flow of traffic.

                            When a number of factors come together, in the confusion, accidents happen. They are generally found to be preventable and, regretably, innocent people are injured or killed.

                            But, the fact remains that if the suspect was compliant, the incident would not have happened. The suspect is ultimaely responsible and in most cases, when taken into custody, is properly charged for the criminal charges permitted by law. Some criminal charges are 2nd degree murder, manslaughter, reckless driving, felony evasion, felony DUI, etc. The suspects are generally: unlicensed, suspended, revoked, in a stolen vehicle, under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol, wanted for another crime, or parole violators. Good people do not cause pursuits!
                            Well said sir!!!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by just joe View Post
                              What would your opinion be if four people had been killed instead of injured?
                              MY opinion would be first, I'm so sorry for the loss of life. That is terrible. My second thought would be to charge the driver of the pursued car with the murders of the 4 people.
                              sigpic
                              Originally posted by Smurfette
                              Lord have mercy. You're about as slick as the business side of duct tape.
                              Originally posted by DAL
                              You are without doubt a void surrounded by a sphincter muscle.

                              Comment

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