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  • sgt jon
    replied
    Originally posted by iowa #1603 View Post
    i am going to repeat.............the interview panel wants your answer. If you are comfortable with that answer , go with it.


    The more you over think or over research the possible questions and the answers to those questions the more disingenuous your answers will become. The panel members will catch on. You won't like their response if they feel they are being played.
    ^^^this^^^

    Leave a comment:


  • pujolsfan146
    replied
    As Iowa said you should come up with your answer. Worst thing you could do is provide an answer not in accordance with your beliefs. The interviewers will see right through you and if you try and beat the system you probably won't get hired.

    Leave a comment:


  • adamt35
    replied
    Originally posted by Cobra7 View Post
    By "letting them go" I mean the persons vehicle is being parked, and someone is coming to pick them up or they are taking a cab home. Whenever I am hired as a Police Officer somewhere, there will never be someone who blows above a .08 who actually will be allowed to drive home. Cop, mayor, politician, etc.
    I understand what you are saying. Just seems like giving someone a pass on a drunk driving charge could possibly encourage the person to do it again. Maybe next time they will crash.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikeymedic
    replied
    There is NO wrong answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cobra7
    replied
    Originally posted by adamt35 View Post
    Just wondering what circumstances would have to be met for you to let someone go who is swerving all over the road with strong alcohol odor on the breath. Seems like they are being quite dangerous.

    Don't you think that they are ruining their own lives by driving in such a manner?
    By "letting them go" I mean the persons vehicle is being parked, and someone is coming to pick them up or they are taking a cab home. Whenever I am hired as a Police Officer somewhere, there will never be someone who blows above a .08 who actually will be allowed to drive home. Cop, mayor, politician, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • adamt35
    replied
    Originally posted by Cobra7 View Post
    Well, for the sake of argument, I would answer with something along the lines of the following.

    I would help the fellow officer out. I would make sure the vehicle stays parked for the night and arrange a ride home. However, he would not be off the hook. I will be at this door the next day chewing him out for putting me in such a bad situation.

    NOW: This discretion that I will use is not limited to Police Officers. I will occasionally do the same thing for people I do not know as well, if certain circumstances are met. Sometimes people make mistakes, and ruining someones life over it is not worth it.

    Since I have provided my answer, I am curious to see what others would do.
    Just wondering what circumstances would have to be met for you to let someone go who is swerving all over the road with strong alcohol odor on the breath. Seems like they are being quite dangerous.

    Don't you think that they are ruining their own lives by driving in such a manner?

    Leave a comment:


  • retired
    replied
    In my time, most if not all of us would take him home without notifying a supervisor, and that was unofficial policy no matter what department he worked for.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pogue Mahone
    replied
    LINY sort of beat me to it. If the OP is looking for answers that will make the interviewers happy...there are none that will will produce an effect that you will see in the panel. After doing several LE interviews out of college every employment interview after that was a breeze.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aerohead
    replied
    Originally posted by 5whiskey View Post
    Sarge, can you 25 me at this location?

    Seriously though, if my man was border-line and there's a chance I would give discretion to any other citizen, then I probably wouldn't arrest him for it. Borderline for me is around the .08 or .09 level, as there's a chance they would be under the legal limit by the time we made it to the intoximeter. I would, however, have another officer there to witness everything and I would inform my supervisor. If my supervisor sees fit to bring the whole thing up then it's on him.

    If the other officer is obviously well over the limit, then I'm going to do my job. Sorry, there are some things I don't give LEOs discretion on and DWI is one of them. I would hate doing my job at that point, but I would do it anyway... with another officer as a witness.
    +1

    Leave a comment:


  • 5whiskey
    replied
    Sarge, can you 25 me at this location?

    Seriously though, if my man was border-line and there's a chance I would give discretion to any other citizen, then I probably wouldn't arrest him for it. Borderline for me is around the .08 or .09 level, as there's a chance they would be under the legal limit by the time we made it to the intoximeter. I would, however, have another officer there to witness everything and I would inform my supervisor. If my supervisor sees fit to bring the whole thing up then it's on him.

    If the other officer is obviously well over the limit, then I'm going to do my job. Sorry, there are some things I don't give LEOs discretion on and DWI is one of them. I would hate doing my job at that point, but I would do it anyway... with another officer as a witness.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aerohead
    replied
    I've heard this answer before and I liked it:

    First off, I would make sure he's not having some sort of medical problem, which I'm SURE he would be. Then I would park his car and call an ambulance and have him taken to the hospital for a check out.

    Leave a comment:


  • countymountie
    replied
    Originally posted by Cobra7 View Post
    In regards to INTERVIEWING for a job as a Police Officer, how would you answer the following interview question?

    You are on patrol in the evening and notice a vehicle swerving in and out of their lane, crossing the center line several times. You pull the vehicle over, and as you approach the smell of alcohol is overwhelming. When you begin to speak to the driver, you realize it is a fellow Police Officer on a different shift in your agency. How do you handle the situation?




    *This isn't meant to start a riot or a war. I'm going through interview processes with Police Departments right now, and I am curious to see how current LEO's would answer. Thanks for the help for those who respond.
    If I suspected that the officer was DUI then I would call a supervisor to notify them of the situation and then make the arrest. If the supervisor wanted to make the arrest, which is normal procedure here, then I would let them have it. I have zero tolerance for DUI. Speeding or other minor traffic charges would get a pass every time.

    Leave a comment:


  • L-1
    replied
    Oh come now, you know no sergeant or anyone else is available in these scenarios.

    Leave a comment:


  • five0h
    replied
    You can never go wrong with "call your sergeant".

    Leave a comment:


  • LINY
    replied
    They want to see that you can back up your answers and won't backpedal. Think for yourself on these questions.

    Leave a comment:

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