Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Off Duty/ Secondary Employment

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Off Duty/ Secondary Employment

    What policies does your department have?

    We have a Secondary Employment Office and have a web-based system that we sign into to accept off duty jobs. We then get paid directly by the customer for the work. All of our jobs are monitored and tracked on the system to make sure we follow the rules.

    Is this the common trend among departments?

  • #2
    You have what?!?
    "We've reached a point where natural selection doesn't have a chance in hell of keeping up with the procreation of imbeciles." -- RSGSRT

    Why is it acceptable for you to be an idiot, but not acceptable for me to point it out?

    Comment


    • #3
      Right now, the favorite off-duty employment is our agency(actually state and federal monies). For the last few years, we have had these government money operations called "Border Star", "Border Security", and "Stonegarden". We just add our names on the operation's spead sheet on our agency's server for the days and shifts we want and just show up. Then, you just patrol in certain areas and try to be productive as you can for the shift. Since we work 4/10's, many work at least two shifts per week. Also, if we want to work part-times in the private sector, we just fill out a part-time employment form request to our supervisor, he signs off on it, and we are off to our part-time. Also, any court or pre-trail, we automatically get 3 hours OT. Many times we show up to court and the case is continued, cancelled or dismissed so we just have our OT slip signed by the ACA or ADA and leave. Instant 3 hours OT. When I do our shift's pay, which we call "Kronos", I have a huge stack of OT slips from just the 12 or so officers on the shift. I don't hate to say it but crime does pay and pays relatively well.

      Also, we can't use our take-home units for private sector part-times unless we are on-call.

      Comment


      • #4
        The Alabama Department of Public Safety, from which I'm retired is very strict concerning off-duty employment. Employment at apartment complexes as Courtesy Attendants, places where alcoholic beverages are sold, any type of private security is prohibited. Troopers are limited to a maximum of twenty hours per week for authorized off-duty employment. The good news is that many opportunities exist for overtime work in Federally funded traffic enforcement overtime, escorting permitted oversize vehicles, security at the State Capitol, and similar activities. Note that not all agencies are as restrictive as mine concerning off-duty employment. Rules and conditions often vary widely from agency to agency.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kchate5 View Post
          What policies does your department have?

          We have a Secondary Employment Office and have a web-based system that we sign into to accept off duty jobs. We then get paid directly by the customer for the work. All of our jobs are monitored and tracked on the system to make sure we follow the rules.

          Is this the common trend among departments?



          Never heard of anything like that.

          .

          Comment


          • #6
            Sign up sheet and word of mouth is how it was done with the last department I had working at my location.

            The job itself had to be approved by the licensing/permit division and then by the chief. This was because the location served alcohol.

            I paid the officers directly at the end of their shift.

            The watch commander for the precinct I was located handled picking guys for me. If you never worked with him, you didn't get the job as he personally vouched for every guy he sent my way. If I had issues, I dealt with him.

            By policy, they were not allowed to be inside the location... however, they made it a point to use the restroom and get drinks from the soda machine on a regular basis. They were responsible to handling and transporting any arrests that were made.

            It's all pretty much networking down here.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kchate5 View Post
              What policies does your department have?

              We have a Secondary Employment Office and have a web-based system that we sign into to accept off duty jobs. We then get paid directly by the customer for the work. All of our jobs are monitored and tracked on the system to make sure we follow the rules.

              Is this the common trend among departments?
              Same exact thing....due to double dipping in the past.
              yeah!

              Comment


              • #8
                We have an office that manages off duty gigs. Clients are required to pay the department, which then lets officers sign up for the off duty gigs by seniority (most senior takes what he wants first, etc.). They cannot directly hire an officer or request a specific officer by name. Everyone pays the same rate, the officers get paid the same rate, and seniority determines everything.
                MAC

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just thought this worth mentioning...

                  Locally, a scrap yard was hiring off-duty officer to come and work as cashiers. The were to take no police action (theft of scrap metal and such) and come to work dressed casually. I just found it odd. Guys jumped on it quick though.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kchate5 View Post
                    What policies does your department have?

                    We have a Secondary Employment Office and have a web-based system that we sign into to accept off duty jobs. We then get paid directly by the customer for the work. All of our jobs are monitored and tracked on the system to make sure we follow the rules.

                    Is this the common trend among departments?
                    We have something similar, called "Paid Detail". We login, pick an available gig (usually at banks, film shoots, ABC/NBC/CBS studios, BJ's/Costco's, Victoria's Secret , corporate HQ's, and a slew of others. The only difference is that the customer sends the NYPD a check, who then sends it to us...turn around is any where from 4-8 weeks, so it's a great supplement, but not something to really rely on. We are limited to 65 hours per month, and may not end a detail within 3 hours from start of our actual department shift, or start a detail within 1 hour from the end of one. The pay is decent, especially for younger guys like me who have yet to reach top pay. The rate is $37/hr for Officer's, something like $45 for Sergeant's and somewhere around $52 for LT's. I did them on almost every single day off until about 2 months ago, then I got burnt out.
                    sigpic
                    __________________

                    "I pity guys like you, I truly do. Everything you own and have you can thank the job for and still you despise it. I don't understand how any man can choose a career, hate it from the beginning, not have the balls to leave, and then complain about it once he's retired."

                    -Thee Rant (surprisingly)
                    __________________

                    Originally posted by NYCTNT
                    DF,

                    Why do you bother?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have nothing. We're not allowed to perform any outside work that's even remotely related to law enforcement - i.e. you can't use any of the "skills" or experience you've gained from the agency to profit in the private sector. Not until you're retired, anyway.

                      About the only LE-related thing you're allowed to do off-duty is teach, such as at a local community college. And that's as a volunteer, only, and must be sanctioned by the agency.
                      "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Our department allows us as much overtime at the jail as we want. Right now I am working 12 out of 14 days every two weeks. I currently work between 145 and 160 hours on every pay check. The only other off-duty uniformed things we have is for high school games, and one private company. That gig is wrapped up by guys that have been doing it for several years though, as they are hired by the company.

                        Comment

                        What's Going On

                        Collapse

                        There are currently 5436 users online. 303 members and 5133 guests.

                        Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                        Working...
                        X