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  • #16
    Originally posted by HardBall View Post
    The guy in the Youtube video is friggin' awesome. He looks a little goofy in that skirt, but I ain't saying a word to that bad dude..
    The sarong is traditional clothing in the Indonesian and Filipino culture which is where the art comes from. He's very authentic in the way he represents and teaches his Silat and Kali.
    "Ability can take you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there"
    -Bottom of a White Castle Cheesebuger Box-

    If it walks like a duck, sounds like a duck, and looks like a duck.....it's probably a duck!


    It is what it is!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by crass cop View Post
      well, theres this "guy".....
      http://budoryuninjutsu.com./

      here's another, same "guy"

      http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...ed=0CB8Q9QEwCA
      wow.... 99.9% sure that's a man.
      "Ability can take you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there"
      -Bottom of a White Castle Cheesebuger Box-

      If it walks like a duck, sounds like a duck, and looks like a duck.....it's probably a duck!


      It is what it is!

      Comment


      • #18
        it is.............
        "I don't go on "I'maworthlesscumdumpster.com" and post negative **** about cum dumpsters."
        The Tick

        "Are you referring to the secret headquarters of a fictional crime fighter or penal complex slang for a-$$hole, anus or rectum?"
        sanitizer

        "and we all know you are a poser and a p*ssy.... "
        Bearcat357 to Dinner Portion/buck8/long relief

        Comment


        • #19
          My son is recommended black belt in Taekwondo. My husband studies Japanese shorin-ryn
          sigpic

          I don't agree with your opinion, but I respect its straightforwardness in terms of wrongness.

          Comment


          • #20
            Ok Mauy Thai and Jiu-Jitsu. Well since that is my back ground I am a little bias towards these styles. But hey just train in something.
            Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


            We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by HardBall View Post
              To my Martial Arts Brothers (and sisters)-

              What martial art would you recommend that involves mostly punching and kicking. I was a boxer so I like to strike and I would like to use my legs more.

              I hate those joint locks (because they don't work until the guy is knocked out). I hate grappling around on the mat with some smelly sweaty opponent (unless its a female..

              It would seem that kick boxing would be the sport but around here, all kickboxing around here is for cardio- there's no sparring.

              So anyone with experience, please let me know what you think- Thanks
              Muay Thai is a pretty solid pick.
              Joint locks work, you just have to practice them over and over again to get the feel and timing down.

              Grappling is good to learn even if you just learn how to defend against it.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by HardBall View Post
                To my Martial Arts Brothers (and sisters)-

                What martial art would you recommend that involves mostly punching and kicking. I was a boxer so I like to strike and I would like to use my legs more.

                I hate those joint locks (because they don't work until the guy is knocked out). I hate grappling around on the mat with some smelly sweaty opponent (unless its a female..

                It would seem that kick boxing would be the sport but around here, all kickboxing around here is for cardio- there's no sparring.

                So anyone with experience, please let me know what you think- Thanks
                Except that the vast majority of our fights end up on the ground.....rolling around with some sweaty oppenent.

                I would second the opinion of Krav Maga......we are now teaching that in our academy and in service defensive tactics classes.

                Whatever form you choose, make sure that you are also following your agencys' UOF policy to the letter.
                The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

                "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

                "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Adrianhamm View Post
                  Muay Thai is a pretty solid pick.
                  Joint locks work, you just have to practice them over and over again to get the feel and timing down.

                  Grappling is good to learn even if you just learn how to defend against it.
                  Joint locks are great for people who passively resisting, but dangerous to use on the crazy ones. Nonetheless, it is still worth learning and I learned my locks from a Jeet Kune Do instructor.

                  But most importantly, it doesn't matter what you choose. You can pick any of these styles. If you constantly train in it.. get hands on with it.. become proficient. You will take that knowledge and confidence with you. And that will give you the upper hand down the road.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jannino View Post
                    Joint locks are great for people who passively resisting, but dangerous to use on the crazy ones. Nonetheless, it is still worth learning and I learned my locks from a Jeet Kune Do instructor.

                    But most importantly, it doesn't matter what you choose. You can pick any of these styles. If you constantly train in it.. get hands on with it.. become proficient. You will take that knowledge and confidence with you. And that will give you the upper hand down the road.
                    +1000000000000
                    Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless - like water.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by crass cop View Post
                      this...as it seems every dirtbag has a "tapout" sticker on their camaro or watches that stuff as much as possible and, even though they may not "train", they pick stuff up and when resisting will perhaps go to that...
                      Krav Maga...anyone? anyone??
                      This +1...a lot of the people I arrest are into either boxing or BJJ. One of my buddies just got into krav maga, and can give me a run for my money. One of the sheriff's depts and a few of the PDs in the Portland area just switched to Krav Maga for their primary DT method.
                      "Beware that, when fighting monsters, you yourself do not become a monster...for when you gaze long into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you." Friedrich Neitzsche

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by HardBall View Post
                        To my Martial Arts Brothers (and sisters)-

                        What martial art would you recommend that involves mostly punching and kicking. I was a boxer so I like to strike and I would like to use my legs more.

                        I hate those joint locks (because they don't work until the guy is knocked out). I hate grappling around on the mat with some smelly sweaty opponent (unless its a female..

                        It would seem that kick boxing would be the sport but around here, all kickboxing around here is for cardio- there's no sparring.

                        So anyone with experience, please let me know what you think- Thanks
                        I will have to STRONGLY disagree with your comment about joint locks. I train in BJJ, and I'm pretty well convinced that they do work. Where did you get this crazy notion that "they don't work until the guy is knocked out?" BJJ and submission wrestling are an integral part of any MMA curriculum.

                        As far as striking goes, I think that some traditional JJ classes might benefit you. If all you want to do is strike, why not train Muay Thai or kick boxing?

                        What are you going to do when a wrestler takes you down , establishes dominant body position, and proceeds to pound your skull?
                        Chuck

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                        • #27
                          Obviously I like JJ but I think the notion of joint locks being useless comes from the whole steven segal type movies. If a 110lb female attempts to grab a 240 lb male by the wrist and throw him using a wrist lock it probably will not happen. Often PS's attempt to teach that style of fighting (koyga, etc), and since many officers train once every two years the technique becomes ineffective. People must train all of the time in order to become good at what they do. I would not suggest a joint lock style to a person who wants to casually train.
                          Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


                          We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Jiu-Jitsu Cop View Post
                            If a 110lb female attempts to grab a 240 lb male by the wrist and throw him using a wrist lock it probably will not happen.
                            I respectfully disagree. I can't really describe it here, but my favorite wrist lock (which sensei affectionately named the 'super wrist lock'; probably not its original Japanese name) requires very little pressure on the 'lifeline' ligament (traveling from index finger through your elbow into your shoulder) to control someone's whole body, regardless of size of either attacker or defender. That's what I love about Judo; it's created with the assumption the other guy is bigger.

                            Plus, you don't know some of the 110 lb girls I know. Alaskan girls are...feisty.

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                            • #29
                              Hey guys,

                              I'm very greatful to the original poster as I was going to post the same question lol. I did a year of varsity freshman hs wrestling (I graudated in 06) so I'm decent with ground stuff. I've been watching the Bourne movies and the fighting style he uses is a Filipino one called Kali. I think it's designed to take on multiple ppl at once and deal with weapons so it could be useful. Does anyone know anythng about how the fighting styles differ (korean,brazil,fillipino,chineese, japaneese etc)? Also te plan is to relocate to DC so if anyone if famaliar with the style i mentioned or where a good school would be to take it that would be great.

                              One final things I heard a stat that something like 95% of all fights end up on the ground so maybe I should go jujitsu?

                              Thanks

                              Steve

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hakko Ryu Jiu Jitsu here. Hakkoryu is a Jujutsu system which uses the body's Keiraku (meridian system) to create varying amounts of pain to control an attacker without necessarily causing serious injury. Japanese and traditional Oriental medicine teaches that "Ki", one of the non-physical aspects of life, flows through Keiraku in the body. Certain Tsubo (special points) along the Keiraku are sensitive to touching or striking and cause sharp distracting pain, but do not necessarily damage bones, joints, or other body tissue. These are the focal points of Hakkoryu techniques that a trained exponent uses to distract, dispatch, or arrest an attacker. Because of the non-injurious potential of these techniques, Hakkoryu is humanitarian in nature.

                                Last edited by Scott941; 05-14-2011, 09:02 PM.

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