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Girl reports rape, charged with filing false report - rapist later caught with photos

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  • Girl reports rape, charged with filing false report - rapist later caught with photos

    http://msmagazine.com/blog/blog/2011...orting-a-rape/

    Woman Pays for Reporting a Rape

    In 2008, an 18-year-old woman in Washington State reported to police that she had been sexually assaulted. But they didn’t believe her. Lynnwood Police Chief Steve Jensen said that her story changed, her details were inconsistent and that people who knew the victim expressed doubts about her story.

    So the police charged her with false reporting, and she pleaded guilty under a deal that included a fine of $500. The charge remains on her record.

    Three years later, Marc O’Leary was arrested in Colorado for charges of sexual assault, kidnapping, burglary and felony menacing. He is being held on $5 million bail. When the police raided O’Leary’s home earlier this month, they found photos of his victims.

    The 18-year-old woman from Washington was in those photographs.

    O’Leary was violent. He would break into women’s homes when he knew they were alone. Wearing gloves and a mask, he would surprise them in their bedrooms and threaten them into cooperation, once using a gun. He would bind their hands and then sexually assault them, while using the self-timer on a camera to take pictures. Afterwards, he would force the women to shower and brush their teeth. He would take their bedding and their clothes, then hide their phones so they couldn’t call the police immediately.

    Over the past year, O’Leary did this to at least two women in the Denver area. He is suspected of having attacked another woman, who managed to escape by jumping out her bedroom window, and another woman in Seattle sometime in 2009.

    Police are saying that the Washington woman’s case has “strong similarities” to the cases O’Leary is being charged with in Colorado. They have reopened her case, reimbursed her $500 and are working on getting her record expunged.

    And that’s all.

    There is little data about what percentage of rape reports are intentionally false–studies that do exist have small sample sizes and non-representative samples. But it shouldn’t matter. When a woman goes to the police with a rape allegation, her complaint should be taken seriously and investigated fully.

    Charging women with false reporting does not discourage false rape allegations–it discourages ALL rape allegations. The courage it takes to report a rape is unimaginable—that’s why most rapes go unreported. This teenager had the guts to go to the police and tell her story, and they didn’t just dismiss her but accuse her. What kind of signal does that send to victims of rape?

    The Lynnwood Police department reported just six rapes in 2008 [PDF]. In other words, they weren’t overloaded with sexual assault cases to work on. The police chief now admits:

    'We were wrong. Everybody feels terrible about it…we take sexual assaults very seriously. Our investigators always get charged up to get the bad guys in these cases.'

    Getting “charged up” is not enough. If they had taken the young woman seriously instead of questioning her credibility, maybe other women would not have had to go through the same thing. Ninety to 95 percent of rapes are committed by serial rapists—such as O’Leary.

    This woman deserves more than just a reimbursement and a clean criminal record. She was put through hell by first O’Leary and then the criminal justice system. How about giving her a splashy public apology and a large settlement, then prosecuting O’Leary for his crime against her AND initiating updated rape-investigation procedures in the police department?

    The newest Ms. cover story discusses the underreporting of rapes by police departments, explaining how police “unfound” rapes that don’t meet the too-limited FBI definition of what a rape is. The story calls for “No More Excuses,” asking police departments to be held accountable for the rapes that occur in their jurisdictions. Police Chief Jensen’s explanation that “her story changed” is an excuse, and it is unacceptable.

  • #2
    Wouldn't this girl have a good lawsuit on her hands?
    Been chatting to a girl online. She's funny, sexy and flirty. Now she tells me she is an undercover cop! How cool is that at her age!?

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    • #3
      Police Chief Jensen’s explanation that “her story changed” is an excuse, and it is unacceptable.

      And also able to be torn apart by any competent defense attorney.

      Comment


      • #4
        very very sad
        "I don't go on "I'maworthlesscumdumpster.com" and post negative **** about cum dumpsters."
        The Tick

        "Are you referring to the secret headquarters of a fictional crime fighter or penal complex slang for a-$$hole, anus or rectum?"
        sanitizer

        "and we all know you are a poser and a p*ssy.... "
        Bearcat357 to Dinner Portion/buck8/long relief

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        • #5
          post deleted
          Last edited by avalon42; 03-13-2015, 05:52 PM.

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          • #6
            How could anyone seriously justify or make an excuse for this?
            Beidh ár lá linn

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            • #7
              Even if her story had changed a bit, isn't that understandable from a psychological point of view? traumatizing events can effect the way a person remembers the event.

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              • #8
                While I do think we should prosecute false rape charges this certainly doesn't sound like they had proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ChiefFox View Post
                  Even if her story had changed a bit, isn't that understandable from a psychological point of view? traumatizing events can effect the way a person remembers the event.
                  You're lucky to remember your own address in the midst or immediately following a trauma. Interesting that they also interviewed people that knew her and based their charges on those interviews.

                  Unless she had a history of making false reports, I am baffled by the choice to file charges against someone reporting a crime. I'd like to know if that detective is still working sex crimes, and also how many of their cases were not sent to the DA.
                  Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                  • #10
                    It's a sad situation, but the news article doesn't give all the facts. She could very well have a history of being unreliable; it says people who knew the victim even doubted her claims. Who knows. It's good to see they refunded her money, reopened the case and are working to get her case expunged. It shows that it could have just been an honest mistake and the police department has the intention of righting the wrong. Hopefully that low life gets what he deserves.

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                    • #11
                      Thats the issue though, a lot of rapists are very good at remaining undetected. They work hard to choose the right victims. Victims who would not look credible. There are a lot of agencies that immediately start discrediting the victim in the name of "A defense attorney will do it eventually" and never really look at the assault itself. Its a serious difficult thing to investigate sex assaults the right way, and a lot of places don't want to do it because it makes their stats look bad. A lot of cases simply don't get cleared because it is one person's word against another. It is easier to pick apart inconsistencies in the victim's story that result from the psychological trauma of the incident and call them a liar then to have your sex assault solve rate plummet.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Exodus259
                        What I don't get, is why she admitted the story was fake and paid a fine. She should have stayed consistent, kept her story up and going, and it would not have been a problem. Hard to say if she could get a law suit out of claiming something was fake, and then suddenly it was real. That's a strange call to make.
                        Did you read the guys MO?

                        O’Leary was violent. He would break into women’s homes when he knew they were alone. Wearing gloves and a mask, he would surprise them in their bedrooms and threaten them into cooperation, once using a gun. He would bind their hands and then sexually assault them, while using the self-timer on a camera to take pictures. Afterwards, he would force the women to shower and brush their teeth. He would take their bedding and their clothes, then hide their phones so they couldn’t call the police immediately.
                        Take that scenario, and throw in a detective who decides that his victim is lying, who maybe starts to badger the victim repeatedly about details that seem hard to believe. Add a long standing tradition of treating rape victims like they did something wrong. Then hold the threat of charging someone with filing a false report, and offering them a plea-deal fine or the possibility of jail time....what would you expect her to do?
                        Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by crass cop View Post
                          very very sad
                          Agreed!

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                          • #14
                            I don't know what was done in that case or how the victim was questioned. The media IMO does a lousy job in getting facts straight in their reporting.
                            If any "victim" was too start giving me inconstant stories about the chain of events I would start doubting their story too. When I got inconsistent answers to basic questions I started asking more and more questions. If their answers indicated to me deception I would articulate it in the report with out actually saying the person was deceptive. So who ever read my report could come to their own opinion on the case.
                            I suspect, in the OP's case, the victim may have been embarrassed and didn't want tell them what really happened.

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                            • #15
                              Even a well meaning detective may ask questions that cause a victim to question themselves. After my own experience, I have to wonder how many of those questions are asked of victims of other crimes.

                              It is also very hard to recall details of a traumatic event....especially if it's drawn out. This man's latest victim was raped repeatedly over a 2 hour period....how much detail do you think she could accurately recall? How much of that detail do you think changes over repeated interviews? How much of those details change or expand when faced with someone that appears judgmental?

                              Remember this, the victim of rape thinks the suspect is going to kill them when it's over, and they are bargaining for their life during the assault.

                              They did not just fail this victim, they gave the rapist the green-light to continue and perhaps even escalate his crimes...I can't help but wonder how many more victims may be out there. How many in their community did not come forward when they saw this young woman charged?
                              Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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