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Safety of LASIK for police officers?

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  • Safety of LASIK for police officers?

    What is your take on it? I discussed it with my optometrist and he said he wouldn't recommend it for a number of reasons including loss of night vision and issues with glare among others. But if anyone here had had it or is/was considering it what's your take?

  • #2
    I'd like to hear opinions as well, as I've considered it.
    --In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

    Comment


    • #3
      Are you contemplating the procedure to meet the requirements of uncorrected vision?

      Some people I know had great results...others have problems at night. My sister, who couldn't see the "E" on the chart had it done...but she can't drive at night because of the glare "halo" of headlights. She still wears glasses to drive and read.

      Some people..like me.. depending on their eye problem can't have the procedure. I can see 20/20 with my contacts. The procedure has come a long way....but not knowing the long term effects would be my concern.

      There isn't a guarentee on what correction they may be able to get you to. Like I said....some have success and love not having to deal with glasses or contacts...and others....well they at least tried. But are you willing to deal with it if it doesn't go right?

      50/50 for me is not good enough for messing with something that is so important like your eyes.

      If you are serious....consult an opthamologist not an optometrist. Google the pros and cons...
      Last edited by deputy x 2; 04-12-2011, 09:12 PM.
      This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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      • #4
        That's my concern. When I put glasses or contacts on my vision is perfect. Not just 20'20, but no loss of night vision or dry eye or issues with glare. I just have to wear corrective lenses.

        And yea, I'm contemplating it but very very much hesitant.

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        • #5
          I've had the procedure. In my application process for Border Patrol I had to have an extra examination in order to verify that my vision was acceptable and that I didn't have any issues with how I healed up. The doc cleared me and that was that.

          I have had no issues with night vision or glare. My eyes did regress slightly after about a year. I was told by the doc it was because I was doing too much reading and close up work without taking a break. Apparently if you stop every 20 minutes or so and look off into the distance, it relaxes your eyes and prevents you lenses from reshaping.

          Before the surgery I had to wear glasses if I wanted to look at my feet and count my toes. Now I only wear them when I am outdoors. Totally worth it for me.

          I could get a "retouch" and have perfect vision again (and not ruin it this time) but there is a six week recoery period where you are not supposed to engage in heavy physical activity. I do not want to spend that much time off from the workout schedule.
          Last edited by Unistat; 04-12-2011, 09:17 PM.
          There are basically two kinds of people in this world. Those that believe in the moon landing and those that don't.
          http://unistat76.blogspot.com/

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          • #6
            I've worn hard contacts since I was 18....yeah it's a pain in the arse to put them in and take them out everyday. BUT I can see...

            It's really personal preference....and if you're willing to gamble with your eyesight. It also depends if you are near sighted or far.

            The optometrist dispenses contacts and glasses....unless you are not a candidate for the procedure...his opinion might be biased.

            I went to an opthamologist...who said it wouldn't work for me. But he also said he wouldn't recommend it to any of his family either.
            This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by deputy x 2 View Post
              Are you contemplating the procedure to meet the requirements of uncorrected vision?

              Some people I know had great results...others have problems at night. My sister, who couldn't see the "E" on the chart had it done...but she can't drive at night because of the glare "halo" of headlights. She still wears glasses to drive and read.

              Some people..like me.. depending on their eye problem can't have the procedure. I can see 20/20 with my contacts. The procedure has come a long way....but not knowing the long term effects would be my concern.

              There isn't a guarentee on what correction they may be able to get you to. Like I said....some have success and love not having to deal with glasses or contacts...and others....well they at least tried. But are you willing to deal with it if it doesn't go right?

              50/50 for me is not good enough for messing with something that is so important like your eyes.

              If you are serious....consult an opthamologist not an optometrist. Google the pros and cons...
              Agree with this.

              You are not sufficiently unlikely to encounter refraction problems (rainbow scintillations, etc.) if you are doing a large correction, and if you are not, I think you're better off with contacts or glasses.

              My vision is about 20/35 in my left eye, and about 20/15 in my right. I'm lucky that my sharper eye is on my shooting hand side. I don't yet have to wear any corrective devices, because I can see well far away with my right, and also see close up with my left.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
                Agree with this.

                You are not sufficiently unlikely to encounter refraction problems (rainbow scintillations, etc.) if you are doing a large correction, and if you are not, I think you're better off with contacts or glasses.

                My vision is about 20/35 in my left eye, and about 20/15 in my right. I'm lucky that my sharper eye is on my shooting hand side. I don't yet have to wear any corrective devices, because I can see well far away with my right, and also see close up with my left.
                I'm right handed and left eye dominant. But us Asians are arse backwards anyhow! You've seen us drive...now watch us shoot!
                This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had LASIK done and have no regrets. my recovery was seven days which kind of sucked because I had to leave contacts in the whole time. The only thing that hasn't been great is when I wake up in the middle of the night my eyes are very very dry and it hurts like hell to open them. I've heard flaxseed oil helps with that but haven't bought any yet.

                  As far as Halo's go, they aren't that common anymore. I personally had PRK done, which is a procedure that is all laser and there is no corneal flap cut. Two days after my procedure I was seeing halos that looked like spider webs around lights at night and I thought great I was one of the few. The next day though my vision was crystal clear and my night vision was amazing.

                  I'd recommend it for anyone but you have to do a lot of research to find the best doctor you can. This is not something I would try to find at a bargain price.
                  "Good people sleep well in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to commit acts of violence on their behalf."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What about like, flap dislocation. I've read of people getting poked in the eye. I read on the FDA's website if you play contact sports or boxing or something similiar, you wouldn't be a good candidate so wouldn't that make law enforcement not a good candidate?

                    Could I even make it through the academy without risking something coming into contact with my face? If I lose my glasses things go a little out of focus, what happens if something happens to the flap? I can always carry a spare set of specs.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Flap dislocation? huh What flap??

                      I only lost my contact once...my fault...in my car...fell down between the radio/siren control...took me forever to find it. I carried a second pair after that.

                      If you wear glasses...things won't fit right like your gas mask. Plus in a fight...they will be the first to fly. Plus if I was a peep I would purposely hit you in the face..to knock off your glasses and maybe your lense will cut your face. Perhaps you should try soft extended wear contacts.

                      OC was uncomfortable...but workable.
                      This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm talking to dvtny2 I think. He said he had LASIK but then described prk so I'm guessing he had prk. That eliminates the risk of flap related issues but.

                        Man, surgery on my eyes is terrifying. Under any other circumstance I'd always avoid the surgical option.

                        I've never worn Contacts actually.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Believe me its a nerve racking surgery. PRK was much easier in my opinion though(sorry about the confusion I did have PRK). The whole process was just a few minutes per eye. the hardest part is when the doctor puts a little buffer type tool on your eye but you don't feel anything. It's just scary because it looked like the tool dentists use when they clean your teeth(the one that spins, not the scraper). After that you just stare at a little red dot for a little bit and then they pour ice cold water in your eye and its over. My doctor told me I was going to be in a lot of pain for a few days but I never felt anything so I must've gotten lucky.

                          The after care is terrible though. You have to put drops in your eyes a million times a day for a month and then regular drops for I believe it was 2-3 months.
                          "Good people sleep well in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to commit acts of violence on their behalf."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had LASIK after I retired & loved it. I have always had very dry eyes. I had duct plugs & use drops as soon as I wake up in the morning.
                            The "poke" factor you worry about is IF you were poked in the eye (during a fight), you can open up the flap. (LASIK is cutting open a flap in the eye then evening out the eye & replacing the flap. (Some people have trouble with halos, some don't.)
                            Bottom line, if you are happy with contacts, stick with them, especially if you have not yet been hired.
                            I LOVE not being tied to contacts anymore.
                            (Of course, a few years later my close up vision deteriorated due to "age", & I need glasses to see my hands

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                            • #15
                              I had LASIK about a year and a half ago. If I had it to do all over again, I would still do it without hesitation.

                              I had worn glasses from age 8 and then graduated to contacts at about 12. My vision gradually got worse and worse over time. I finally decided to have it done about two years ago and started the process. I had to wear glasses for a week prior to the surgery, but that wasn't a big deal. The surgery wasn't bad, but I did have a few minor issues with it. The pills they gave me didn't work as they do on most people and took longer to kick in than expected, so when they had an issue with the flap on my second eye, it was very uncomfortable for a few minutes. Afterwards, I took 3 days off to recuperate and was back to work. I had to go back a few days after the surgery to have the second flap readjusted and again it was uncomfortable, but not unbearable. Since then, my vision has been pretty great. My only gripe is about the nighttime halos. When it gets dark, every street light, headlight, bar sign, or other point of illumination surrounded by darkness has a small amount of a halo around it. The more dim the light it, the less the halo comes into play. If I were still working midnights, it may be an issue, but since I'm on the 7am-3pm shift now, it is a non-issue.

                              Before the surgery, they performed several tests, including the normal eye test chart. At normal distance (I think something like 20-ft), rather than seeing the E and a few lines below it, all I saw was a big white blur. I couldn't even guess at the top character. Afterwards, my vision jumped to 20/15 in my right eye and 20/22 in my left eye. I honestly would have paid twice as much as I did to have these results. If you are a candidate for the procedure, then do it. I have no regrets.

                              Comment

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