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Something To Keep In Mind...

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  • The_Lor
    replied
    Awesome story, thanks for posting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trauma1
    replied
    It's nice to see the good and read the praise. You guys and gals do stuff like this every day and to you, it is your job. But I'll say thank-you to you all anyway, it's something you all don't hear enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • katseiye
    replied
    Great post. Something that most in the biz see on an altogether frequent occurence but almost never get reported as happened. Thank goodness most leo's and f/f's didn't enter the biz for personal recognition. It is nice to see a positive story reported accurately at least once in a while. Again, thanks for the post.

    Leave a comment:


  • oneoldcop
    replied
    Originally posted by OneAdam12 View Post
    These just-doing-my-job officers are the same as the Silver Star and Medal of Honor nominees in wartime.
    + 1...

    Heroes in every sense of the word.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneAdam12
    replied
    These just-doing-my-job officers are the same as the Silver Star and Medal of Honor nominees in wartime.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chaplain Keppy
    replied
    Thanks for posting this, Vince.

    Thank God there are people in the world for whom "just doing my job" means more than "just putting in time to get my paycheck"!

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Thanks Vince


    These types of situations happen, while not every day, but most likely weekly throughout the United States.

    Most are not reported, because the officers are "just doing their jobs."

    I put "just doing their jobs" in quotation marks because that is EXACTLY what most of the officers would say they were doing .

    Leave a comment:


  • vincelli
    started a topic Something To Keep In Mind...

    Something To Keep In Mind...

    There have been a lot of recent threads in which I was tempted to post this article.

    Instead of picking one, or posting in many, I decided to make it a General post.

    Officer's Efforts Deserve Praise

    (Originally published by the Press & Sun Bulletin, Binghamton, NY. April 25th, 2008)

    Police officers catch a lot of grief in their jobs, especially when they make a traffic stop. Like umpires in baseball, just about every decision they make gets second-guessed. And then there's the hoary cliché about the cops never being around when you need one.

    Well, some folks in Binghamton desperately needed one early Friday morning and they got several.

    There are few things more terrifying than the thought of awakening in the middle of the night to a fire in your home, but that was the nightmare for the residents of 23 Eldredge St. One of them, 9-year-old Rodney Smith II, is now a patient at Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, and as the community prays for his recovery it also has to give thanks that so many others escaped the fire, which destroyed the apartment building and a home next door and left 12 people homeless. And credit for that goes to heroic efforts by Binghamton police and firefighters.

    Patrolman Conor Heslin was on routine patrol in his car around 3:30 when he smelled smoke. He began checking the area and as he crested the Chenango Street viaduct he spotted a house on fire. He raced to the scene, called the fire in and, as he got out of his car, he heard someone calling for help.

    As he moved toward the house, Sgt. Martin Burnett and Patrolman XXXXXXXXXXX arrived. Unable to enter the building through front or back doors because of flames, they broke out first-floor windows on the west side of the building and then went to the east.

    That's where they found Zoe Honnick, holding her 18-month-old daughter. Heslin talked the woman, who is pregnant, onto a first-floor roof and told her to lower the child and drop her into his arms. "I caught it," he said later, "(and) ran it to the street to safety."

    Meanwhile, Burnett and XXXXXXXXXXX assisted Honnick to safety after she had started to climb down a gutter.

    Two men escaped a first-floor apartment through windows the officers had broken. The police also helped a couple and their 8-year-old daughter escape the fire - and learned that two other children were still inside.

    Burnett climbed onto the first-floor porch and got a window open. A 13-year-old climbed out and ran through the flames to safety, but his 9-year-old brother suddenly ran back into the smoke.

    Binghamton firefighters were on the scene by then, and Lt. Brian Grace and firefighter John Shine donned air packs to enter the blazing building, where they found the child, Rodney Smith II, in his front bedroom. He was taken to Upstate Medical center with what his mother said were burns to his head and midsection. The hospital has not released information on the child's condition.

    Sgt. Burnett and Patrolman XXXXXXXXXXX also were injured. Burnett suffered a broken bone in his ankle from kicking in a door; XXXXXXXXXXX suffered smoke inhalation.

    "The police did a phenomenal job," said Assistant Fire Chief Larry Ostanek.

    "It was pretty heroic stuff," agreed police Capt. John Shea.

    Indeed. The three police officers are heroes in every sense of the word. So are the firefighters who went into the inferno to rescue a child.

    The lives of all involved were changed that morning. The victims and the rescuers are forever linked - particularly Patrolman Heslin and the child - and the events of that night will echo for generations.

    It's something to keep in mind the next time you're tempted to give a cop any grief.
    -V

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