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  • NYPD Takes Hero Dog

    This doesn't seem very fair. Of course, we don't know everything that really transpired. Maybe some of our NY cops can elaborate.

    =======================================
    ANGUISH OF K-9 COP KIN AS NYPD TAKES HERO DOG

    By PHILIP MESSING
    ---------------------------------

    BEST BUDDIES:
    Heartbroken Brianne Ulmer, 7, thinks the police were "mean" to remove Loki, says her dad.

    January 20, 2002 -- They were partners for two years and barely survived the World Trade Center destruction together. Now an NYPD decision has come between Officer Everett Ulmer and his beloved police dog, Loki.

    A month after Loki nearly died in the Twin Towers collapse, Ulmer was transferred out of the elite Canine Unit after crossing swords with his supervisors over an internal-training dispute.

    His reassignment, after 16 years with the unit, stripped Ulmer of the 3-year-old German shepherd who arrived at the family's Floral Park, L.I., home as an 11-month-old puppy.

    Ulmer said his wife and four children are grief-stricken.

    "My 7-year-old daughter says, 'Daddy, I thought policemen are supposed to help people. Why are they being so mean and taking my dog?' That dog was her friend," Ulmer told The Post.

    The family visited Loki, who was at an NYPD kennel, until the dog was reassigned to a sergeant in Ulmer's former unit just before Christmas.

    Michael O'Looney, spokesman for the NYPD, defended the department.

    "The policy for keeping the dog is that the officer has to have worked with the dog for at least three years - and have left the unit on good terms.

    "Officer Ulmer worked with his dog for two years and did not leave on good terms. These are expensive, highly trained dogs. Each costs $3,000 and goes through 16 weeks of specialized training. Reassigning the dog saves $3,000 and involves eight weeks of new training."

    Ulmer said his problems within the Canine Unit began last May, when he refused to sign a state certification form for a mandated monthly training exercise for another Canine Unit cop. Ulmer believes it angered a sergeant in his unit and led to retaliatory acts.

    A police spokesman said Ulmer had been transferred because he failed to work well with his supervisors, was poor at record-keeping and refused to show up at assignments.

    Ulmer called those reasons "lies," providing The Post with two annual "performance evaluation" reports in which he was rated either "extremely competent" or "highly competent" in 25 separate categories.

    "He is an organized, conscientious officer who interacts well with his peers and supervisors. Recommend he be promoted," one report concluded.

    "If the bosses want to hurt you, they'll keep the dog - that's the bottom line," said Homer Green, who spent 17 years in the Canine Unit before retiring in October 2000.

    "Everett is an excellent trainer and there's no reason for him not to have his dog."

    Ulmer was reassigned to the 61st Precinct in Sheepshead Bay.
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  • #2
    I understand how that could be hard on everyone involved.

    I can see why the NYPD would be worried about the money that they have invested. But is thier decision really best? Some dogs don't adapt well if they have to switch handlers.

    Maybe we could pass the hat around. We could just buy Loki from the NYPD and give him to the Ulmer's.

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    • #3
      Lone Ranger That sounds like one of the best ideas I've heard in a long time.
      Stay safe and watch your back. Survived Katrina. Now a Official member of the Chocolate City Police.

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      • #4
        I was thinking the same thing but I thought the odds were probably against us.
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        • #5
          I am going to get reamed here, but this is a good life learning lesson for that 7 year-old.

          The sooner she takes the word "fair" out of her vocabulary when it comes to her expectations of how life treats her, the quicker she will be a well adjusted person.

          The "grief stricken family" should get real. Sad and dissapointing, but grief stricken?
          "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm sure that the NYPD considered the fall out and PR ramifications when they broke up this partnership. I know we have several K9 officers on the forum , including one from my own agency. Sadly, the dog is the property of NYPD and the K-9 officer knew it. I'm sure the NYPD will not disclose this internal disciplinary issue publicly. The dog is only three years old and belongs in a partnership with another officer doing what it is trained to do. Logic not emotion dictates that they utilize the dogs training.

            I know that I will get flamed, but this is a business decision. These are specially trained animals not the normal pooch down the street. Sure there is the human bond, the hurt feeling,I feel badly for the child. On its face there will be the perception that NYPD is the boogie man. However I suspect that this officer FUBARed in a major way to get the K9 partner yanked.

            Shields are going up

            [ 01-21-2002: Message edited by: Guard Dog ]
            "The view only changes for the lead dog." ~ Sergeant Preston of The Yukon ~

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            • #7
              Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
              I am going to get reamed here,
              You're right.

              The "grief stricken family" should get real.
              What if someone took your child or pet away from you after you've lived with it for 2 years?
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              • #8
                Originally posted by policewebdev:

                What if someone took your child or pet away from you after you've lived with it for 2 years?

                I think you have made my point....people are going to equate this to a emotional issue of NYPD taking a pet.not the business decision which keeps the K9 in service to the people of New York. Yes there are emotions and bonding etc, but bottom line is the dog is only three years old and was purchased and trained to be a police dog, not a "policemans" dog.

                Our general orders are very specific on this and I bet NYPD is the same. The dog is the property of NYPD. I read in the news article that the NYPD had this issue addressed in their rules.
                "The view only changes for the lead dog." ~ Sergeant Preston of The Yukon ~

                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree that if the officer did something wrong where he was transfered out of the k-9 unit then the dog should be placed with a new handler. Since the dog is considered a police officer in many ways it would be wrong to use the dog in the capacity that it was trained for. I think it is sad that the family has lost a friend but since it was never really theirs then they should get over it. I think if they need a dog that bad they can always go out and find a puppy that will suit their family needs and train it to their satisfaction so that they are happy once again. The dog in my opinion should remain with the NYPD.

                  Klar
                  Are you a Veteran? If so join AMVETS the only organization that accepts all vets no matter when or where they served. Contact me for more info.

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                  • #10
                    What if someone took your child or pet away from you after you've lived with it for 2 years?
                    I said it was sad and dissappointing!!

                    First of all, if you are giving equal weight to a dog and and child you have some really serious issues with priorities,and is just wacky, IMO.

                    AS A MATTER OF FACT

                    I just lost a dog after 10 years, a beautiful Siberian Husky named Falcor. Best dog I ever owned: see the key word is OWNED. He was with us since my five year old daughter was born. He loved her, and she was crushed when he left.

                    I felt sympathy for her sadness, but used it as an opportunity to teach her a little about life.

                    I think grief-stricken is a term someone would use whose child might have died, or maybe lost someone in the terrorist attacks, but for a dog going to live somewhere else? PLLLLLEEEEEAAAAASSSSSSEEEEEE!!

                    [ 01-22-2002: Message edited by: txinvestigator1 ]
                    "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                      if you are giving equal weight to a dog and and child you have some really serious issues with priorities,and is just wacky, IMO.
                      Hmmm...I have no issues with my priorities. And I'm not wacky. What I can't believe, is that you made that statement.

                      Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                      I just lost a dog after 10 years.
                      Sorry to hear that.

                      Originally posted by txinvestigator1:

                      grief-stricken is a term, but for a dog going to live somewhere else?
                      Think about it. The dog lived there for 2 years with those people. It ate, slept, drank, played with the little girl/people. People especially children become attached to animals.

                      I agree that NYPD OWNS the dog and that they have the right to take it back. But I also think that this dog may have a hard time now since has to "re-train" itself to a new owner. It's like starting all over again.
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                      • #12
                        I've had patrol cars for as long as 2 years. After 5 years I just gave up my nylon gear and S&W 4046. I had some sort of attachment to them, but I realized the reality of it all...IT WAS ISSUED EQUIPMENT! Just because this particular piece of equipment has fur and a heartbeat, things stay the same...it's equipment to perform a job. If you're no longer assigned to a specialized unit, any and all specialized equipment stays in the unit.

                        I feel bad for them, I really do. No matter what part the dog played in the family's lives it would hurt to see it leave, but they should have understood from the beginning that sometimes good things must come to an end.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          posted 01-22-2002 12:03 PM
                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          quote:
                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                          if you are giving equal weight to a dog and and child you have some really serious issues with priorities,and is just wacky, IMO.
                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Hmmm...I have no issues with my priorities. And I'm not wacky. What I can't believe, is that you made that statement.


                          quote:
                          Your original question to me was how would I feel if someone took my child or pet away from me after I had lived with it for 2 years?

                          You don't think the comparison between how I would feel if my dog was taken away and I would feel if my child was taken away is a wacky comparison? I'll say it again, IMO someone who would react the same to their dog being taken away and their kid being taken away have their priorities messed up.

                          Think about it. The dog lived there for 2 years with those people. It ate, slept, drank, played with the little girl/people. People especially children become attached to animals.
                          I don't have to think about it, I lived it. So what?
                          "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by txinvestigator1:
                            You don't think the comparison between how I would feel if my dog was taken away and I would feel if my child was taken away is a wacky comparison? I'll say it again, IMO someone who would react the same to their dog being taken away and their kid being taken away have their priorities messed up.
                            I don't have to think about it, I lived it. So what?
                            True, they are two different things. And yes, you would feel more upset if it was a child. I wasn't asking you. I was saying what if you (as a child) had something like this taken away from you. You missed the whole point. And it's not wacky. Obviously, this can't be explained to you.
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                            • #15
                              SO the kids upset, big deal. A good parent explains these things to a child and makes a life lesson out of it.

                              From your initial response to my first post in this thread:


                              What if someone took your child or pet away from you after you've lived with it for 2 years?
                              That was the question you posed.

                              Then in you last post you said:

                              I wasn't asking you. I was saying what if you (as a child) had something like this taken away from you. You missed the whole point. And it's not wacky. Obviously, this can't be explained to you.
                              So you were asking what a child would feel like if a child was taken away from him???

                              Who has problems with explanations??

                              I did get the point and you know it. You saw how wacky it was, and now you are trying to change your concept.

                              I guess the policeman should sue the NYPD for the trauma to his daughter, and every day tell her how awful and unfair it is. He should then put her in grief counseling.

                              How ridiculous.
                              "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final"--Bill Jordan

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