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  • Ticket Triggers

    Most of time, I don't like to write tickets. It makes people mad, cry, and dislike police. I have found, sometimes, that just stopping a car is enough to grab their attention and follow the speed limit, etc.

    My main trigger for a ticket is, as I approach the car the driver will say, "Can I ask you why you pulled me over?"

    My usual answer is, "Sure, you're going to read about it in a few minutes.".

    Any other pet peeves on traffic stops?

  • #2
    Stupid civilian should know better than to question someone of your stature, right?

    My wife was stopped right down the street from work about 4 years ago, and releted this story to me. The officer walked up to the window and said the he thought her inspection was expired but it was not and he apologized. I suppose it could have been appropriate for her to ask this guy what he stopped her for since she knew she had not done anything.

    [ 05-10-2003, 07:48 AM: Message edited by: Mike Tx ]

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    • #3
      Stupidity.

      I dont like to write tickets either. Most of the time, I'll give you a warning...unless you were being stupid, or you happen to have a lenthy driving history.

      Crossing on a yellow line,littering, driving like a maniac(pet peeves of mine) will get you ticket. I often wished there was a box on the ticket to check that said " Driving while STUPID" because I think it would get used alot.

      I always inform people of why I stopped them as a common courtesy.Done in a proffesional manner, it seems to set the tone for stop and answers the first question many people have, ecpecially when speeding. If they happen to ask, as far as Im concerned, they have every right to know.

      The rest of the time, a warning seems to work. It does get their attention, and it makes them think a bit.
      "The American People will never knowingly adopt Socialism. Under the name of "liberalism" they will adopt every segment of the socialist program,until one day America will be a socialist nation without knowing how it happened."

      Norman Thomas

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      • #4
        Asking me to "wait a minute" because they were talking on a cell phone...

        Slam dunk, every equipment violation I can find and run every check I can so they have to "wait a minute" until I'm done...
        Jim
        "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

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        • #5
          ret,

          quote:
          Originally posted by retdetsgt:
          Asking me to "wait a minute" because they were talking on a cell phone...

          Slam dunk, every equipment violation I can find and run every check I can so they have to "wait a minute" until I'm done...
          Jim

          So you punish then on the spot because they were already talking on their cell phone when you stopped them? You think it is appropriate to use your authority to make them "wait" because they annoyed you?
          Retired

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          • #6
            In some places, driving while on the cell phone is a ticket itself, and rightly so, unless it is hands-free equipment.
            Dave Kiefner
            [i]Die Wahrheit ist eine Perle. Werfen sie nicht vor die S

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            • #7
              The one time I got a ticket, I ran a stop sign. I was driving for a job interview and was very preoccupied (my fault) in an unfamiliar rural area (no excuse) and blew the sign. Fortunately (or unfortunately) there was no one around except for the Sheriff's Deputy who saw me do it. He pulled me over started asking me for license, registration, insurance and asking me all kinds of questions about where I lived, etc. All the while, I'm trying to figure out what I did that prompted the stop. He went to his car to run my license and when he came back and started writing the ticket, I finally asked him what this was all about (he sure wasn't telling). It was then he informed me that I had run the stop sign about 2 miles back. I knew exactly what I had done the minute he said it, but until then I was totally in the dark.

              I later got a job with the Sheriff's Department and I teased this deputy because he gave me my first (and only) traffic ticket. But at the time, I didn't think it was handled especially well. Once the determination was made that I was not a fugitive from justice, had no BOLO's out on me, it would have been courteous to tell me why I was going to have to pay a $70 fine BEFORE he started writing the ticket(that's how long ago this was; it's a lot more now).

              GA-Cop, most (certainly not all) normally law abiding citizens, who break traffic laws don't do it on purpose. When they ask you WHY you've stopped them, it's probably because they were like me, and truly didn't know what they did, not because they're playing dumb or being a smart a**.

              [ 05-10-2003, 11:12 AM: Message edited by: auntysuz63 ]
              "Americans don't want a mentally unstable president; he might start a war or something." - Bill Maher

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              • #8
                Mike Tx, the point I was trying to make is this; I walk up towards their car, when I make eye contact I state, "The reason I stopped you is ..."

                The gripe comes when I haven't even reached the front bumper of my car, and they're hanging out the window asking why they were stopped, or" Can I help you, officer?".

                [ 05-10-2003, 11:39 AM: Message edited by: GA-Cop ]

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                • #9
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by dkiefner:
                  In some places, driving while on the cell phone is a ticket itself, and rightly so, unless it is hands-free equipment.

                  But talking on the police radio and looking at a MDT is different...
                  Bill R

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                  • #10
                    I just wanted to add my two cents in here. Like some others said, not everyone knows why they're being pulled over. If someone was going 80 in a 25, certainly they should know they were speeding, but what about if they have a brake light out? How would they know that unless someone told them?

                    I think every police officer should inform the driver of why they're being pulled over. You can't just assume every single person on the road is a reckless, good-for-nothing criminal.

                    As for the driver saying, "Hold on, I'm talking on my cell phone," well that would tick me off too. That's just plain rude.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dave,

                      quote:
                      Originally posted by dkiefner:
                      In some places, driving while on the cell phone is a ticket itself, and rightly so, unless it is hands-free equipment.

                      I of course wasn't refering to those states that have a "no cell phone" usage while driving. A ticket would be appropriate in that circumstance.

                      Myself, I can't imagine getting annoyed because someone was on a cell phone when I stopped them. Why would that irritate an officer to the point that he or she would then embark on a mission of retribution??
                      Retired

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                      • #12
                        If the person asks before you get a chance to tell them, then just tell 'em. [Wink] By all means telling them why they were stopped should be the first thing you do.

                        And guys, traffic enforcement is a typically distasteful procedure for officer and civilian. But it is necessary. A violator contact is an opportunity to show show the average citizen that you are professional and not taking the stop personal.

                        You are not there to enforce attitudes
                        quote:
                        My main trigger for a ticket is, as I approach the car the driver will say, "Can I ask you why you pulled me over?"

                        My usual answer is, "Sure, you're going to read about it in a few minutes.".

                        Asking me to "wait a minute" because they were talking on a cell phone...

                        Slam dunk, every equipment violation I can find and run every check I can so they have to "wait a minute" until I'm done...
                        As for the driver saying, "Hold on, I'm talking on my cell phone," well that would tick me off too. That's just plain rude.

                        All of these comments show that the attitude and demeanor of the violator are more relevant to enforcement action than the actual violation that caused the stop.

                        Traffic stops can go a long way toward setting the attutudes your public has towards its officers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In Montana you are required to inform the person being stopped of who you are, why you stopped them and that they are being detained until you are done with them. How you inform them is up to you. If you don't, you risk loosing any evidence or statements gained until you complete those three things. This comes up allot in DUI trials in this area.

                          Basically saying the following will work just fine: Good Afternoon, I am Officer Smith with the Your Town Police Dept. and I stopped you for running that Red light. This will just take a minute and you will be on your way if everything checks out.

                          And it will go a long way in keeping a good rapport with the public.

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                          • #14
                            in that case, i tell them as soon as i get their information i will tell them.

                            i work traffic so almost everyone i stop gets some sort of ticket.

                            and NEVER EVER ask for a warning.

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                            • #15
                              >>>But talking on the police radio and looking at a MDT is different... <<<

                              As a matter of fact it is, Bill.

                              There is a huge difference between occasional transmission on a radio vs driving for an hour with the phone glued to your ear. Further, LEO's are trained in advanced driving techniques, vs. Joe citizen, who only had to answer 20 multiple choice questions and take an eye and road test to get behind the wheel.
                              Dave Kiefner
                              [i]Die Wahrheit ist eine Perle. Werfen sie nicht vor die S

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