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Static Electricty Hurts! - How Can it be Stopped?

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  • DaveInTx
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by AutumnAngel:
    FINALLY! Maybe some of you can answer this for me then....

    For some reason whenever I go to the store I DREAD getting the milk because whenever I open that silly door to the Milk containers I get zapped really BAD! I mean it zings all the way up my arm. EVERY TIME!

    HELP!

    Well, 2 things come to mind: (1) The refrigerator door is the first grounded metal object you touch in the store, and the shock is from static electricity that has built up on your body and is dissipated at that time; (2) The store's refrigerator is a shock hazard and needs to be checked by an electrician. In case (2) I would expect that other customers are also being shocked--have you checked to learn if that is the case? In case (1) you would be shocked by touching any grounded metal object--have you ever experienced that? If the shock comes from static electricity on your body (case 1) then use a key to discharge it before opening the refrigerator door. If the situation is case (2) the refrigerator needs to be repaired!

    DaveInTx
    Texan By Choice, not Accident

    Leave a comment:


  • AutumnAngel
    replied
    FINALLY! Maybe some of you can answer this for me then....

    For some reason whenever I go to the store I DREAD getting the milk because whenever I open that silly door to the Milk containers I get zapped really BAD! I mean it zings all the way up my arm. EVERY TIME!

    HELP!

    Leave a comment:


  • wonderwoman
    replied
    Jim, if none of the above ideas work try having a party and invite people over you don't like and keep touching them all evening or until you are all out of "static". Repeat if necessary!

    Leave a comment:


  • DaveInTx
    replied
    If your only concern is to avoid being shocked and you won't get a humidifier (it can be an attachment to your furnace or heating unit), just walk around carrying a key or small flat metal object and first touch things with it. Zap! The larger surface area you are holding avoids concentrating the discharge at a small area of skin and the metal object takes the brunt of the jolt.

    DaveInTx

    Leave a comment:


  • InSane1
    replied
    Actually Mitzi, that is a great suggestion. OR... you could get some WitchHazel in a spray bottle (If you don't want the stickiness of hairspray).

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob A
    replied
    You can add a whole-house humidifier to your heating and AC system. Call and HVAC contractor. This will take care of most of it.

    BTW, if you get shocked as I do, when you get in or out of the car, it's from your pants rubbing on the seat. Hold on to something metal when you get in or out. DO NOT PULL ON THE DOOR!! this will make the door sag. Just put your hand on the roof pillar or some metal part of the body.

    Make sure you use fabric softener when you do laundry. I use the sheets in the dryer, since that's where the static comes from.

    Leave a comment:


  • kirch
    replied
    I'm losing track of which are serious suggestions and which aren't.

    For the record, here are some real suggestions:

    1. Change your shoes, or wear shoes
    I have a pair of all-leather slippers I like to wear around the house. But in the winter they are unbearable because they generate too much static. It's even better when I just wear socks. Normal rubber-soled shoes seem to generate the least amount of static.

    2. Change your floor coverings
    Admittedly not the cheapest option. But carpeting generates a LOT of static electricity. Go to hardwood or vinyl floors and you'll notice a signicant decrease.

    3. Get water into the air
    If you don't want to spring for a humidifier (vaporizers have come under fire for their mold-producing aspects) you can put out pans of water that will evaporate into the air. Things that will increase effectiveness include using shallow pans (more surface area means more water evaporating into the air) and heat (the warmer the water the faster it will evaporate). We put a shallow baking pan on most of our radiators when the air gets really dry.

    4. Become Electro-Man
    Get a form-fitting suit with a big lightning bolt on the chest, a cape and a mask. Then go around fighting crime with your special electrical powers.

    Okay, one of those isn't a real suggestion. I'll let you figure out which.

    Leave a comment:


  • Southpaw
    replied
    Put a teaspoon of liquid fabric softner in a spray bottle and fill with water. Shake. Lightly mist carpeting. Repeat when necessary. Static Guard works too, but is way more expensive.

    Alternately, staple dryer sheets to your shoes

    Leave a comment:


  • Mitzi1
    replied
    This may sound weird but try spraying hair spray on your hands, just a little. I use it to get the static electricity out of some of my clothes. Of course, don't get near a fire cause it's flammable. Just a light spray might help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Burnes
    replied
    Well, since the fire department left a few minutes ago, my apartment is now very humid, and there is no more static electricity problem.

    But they took away my power cords, and capped my outlets. They were very rude.

    Now, I have to use candles to light up my room and I am wondering...

    Jim Burnes

    Leave a comment:


  • shooter1201
    replied
    I've been told by people in the electronics buisness to NOT touch your TV, stereo, computer, etc....UNTIL you have discharged the static buildup. Supposedly, the static electricity is enough to FRY the memory chips in most home electronics unless they are properly shielded.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hightower
    replied
    Do you wear shoes around the house??? It may be just the simple fact of wearing socks around on the carpet. Maybe buy a pair of slippers with a rubber sole. Or, as my mother used to tell me "STOP dragging your feet!!!!"

    Hightower

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  • 207
    replied
    Jim, have you thought about moving to say.... Costa Rica or the amazon region?? [Wink]

    Leave a comment:


  • On Paper
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Jim Burnes:
    OK, I took some power cords, stipped off the ends to bare metal and plug them into the outlets. I dropped them into my 25 and 50 gal fish tanks, so now my place is pretty humid!

    If I remember my freshman science lessons correctly, running current to two electrodes submersed in water will break the water down to its two elemental components: hydrogen and oxygen. This, along with Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill R
    replied
    Jim, just wear this and attach the wire to a ground. You may want to lengthen the wire unless you want to be on a short leash.

    Leave a comment:

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