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It's official, Chevy Caprce to return to US market for police use...

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  • It's official, Chevy Caprce to return to US market for police use...

    http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f...cop-car-84762/

    DENVER – An all-new Chevrolet Caprice Police Patrol Vehicle (PPV) will join the ranks of law enforcement departments across North America in 2011. It’s a modern, full-size, rear-drive sedan that will offer both V-8 and V-6 engines, as well as a host of specialized equipment and features.

    Chevrolet made the announcement at the annual International Association of Chiefs of Police convention, in Denver, Colorado. The Caprice PPV will be available for ordering next year and will hit the streets in early 2011.

    “The new Chevrolet Caprice police car is the right tool at the right time for law enforcement,” said Jim Campbell, general manager for GM Fleet and Commercial Operations. “We asked for a lot of feedback from our police customers, which helped us develop a vehicle that is superior to the Crown Victoria in key areas.”

    Vice President, Global Chevrolet Brand Brent Dewar added, “Along with Impala and Tahoe, the Caprice PPV gives agencies a greater range of choices for police and special service vehicles that are all available from Chevrolet.”

    Unlike other police cars on the market, the Caprice PPV is not based on existing “civilian” passenger-car model sold in North America. It has been developed in key areas specifically for police duty, containing modern equipment and features:

    Powerful 6.0L V-8 with fuel-saving Active Fuel Management technology and E85 capability delivers expected best-in-class 0-60 acceleration (sub six seconds) and top speed; a V-6 engine will also be offered, beginning in the 2012 model year
    Optional front-seat-only side curtain air bags allows a full-width rear-seat barrier for greater officer safety
    Two trunk-mounted batteries, with one of them dedicated to powering various police equipment
    Designed for five-passenger seating, meaning the upper-center section of the dashboard can be used for equipment mounting without the concern of air bag deployment interference
    Compatibility with in-dash touch-screen computer technology
    Special front seats designed for the long-term comfort of officers whose car is their effective office, including space that accommodates the bulk of a typical equipment belt

    The front seats are sculpted to “pocket” the equipment belt, which greatly increases the comfort for a great range of police officer sizes. The foam density of the seatback and cushion insert surfaces are designed to conform to the shape of an equipment belt’s various items, too, allowing the officer’s back to rest properly on the seatback surface.

    “The Chevrolet Caprice PPV’s seats represent a revolution in comfort and utility for officers who spend long hours in their car,” said Bob Demick, lead seat design manager. “The shape also enhances entry and egress, making it easier for officers to exit the vehicle quickly. The seatback bolsters, for example, have been purposefully contoured to help pocket the equipment on the belt, which includes the gun, Taser and handcuffs, which rest comfortably in the sculpted lower bolsters. That also increases the longevity of the trim cover surface.”

    Along with comfort, the materials used in the seats were also carefully selected. High-wear materials were chosen to stand up to long hours of everyday use, while breathability, long-term durability and ease of cleaning were also important criteria.

    Engineers worked on several iterations of the seat, testing a couple of versions in the field to get real-world feedback from police officers, who used prototype seats in their cruisers for a month. Their input helped determine the final design.

    Class-leading space

    The Caprice PPV is based on GM’s global rear-drive family of vehicles that also underpins the Chevy Camaro. It uses the longest wheelbase of the architecture – 118.5 inches (3,010 mm) – along with a four-wheel independent suspension that delivers responsive high-performance driving characteristics that are crucial in some police scenarios.

    Caprice PPV’s long wheelbase also contributes to exceptional spaciousness. Compared to the primary competition, its advantages include:

    A larger interior volume – 112 cubic feet / 3,172 liters – than the Ford Crown Victoria, including nearly 4 inches (101 mm) more rear legroom
    The barrier between the front seat and rear seat is positioned farther rearward, allowing for full front-seat travel and greater recline for officer comfort
    At 18 cubic feet (535 liters) free space (beyond battery located in trunk), the Caprice’s trunk volume is large enough to accommodate a full-size spare tire under a flat load surface in the trunk storage area.

    The Caprice’s 6.0-liter V-8 is rated at an estimated 355 horsepower (265 kW) with an estimated 384 lb-ft of torque. It is backed by a six-speed automatic transmission that is performance-calibrated for police duty. Additional, police car-specific powertrain and vehicle system features include:

    High-output alternator
    Engine oil, transmission and power steering coolers
    Standard 18-inch steel wheels with bolt-on center caps
    Large, four-wheel disc brakes with heavy-duty brake pads
    Heavy-duty suspension components
    Police-calibrated stability control system
    Driver information center in the instrument cluster with selectable speed tracking feature.

    A host of complementary features are also offered, including special equipment packages such as spotlights; lockouts for the power windows and locks; and an “undercover” street-appearance package (9C3).

    To enable more room for interior equipment, the standard radio can be relocated to the trunk, allowing for an in-dash, touch-screen computer to be used.

    Caprice on patrol: A brief history

    Chevrolet’s history with law enforcement is almost as old as the brand itself. Police departments have used Chevy sedans as police cars for decades, ordering them with basic equipment and powerful V-8 engines – including some special engines that weren’t available in regular-production models, such as the 1959 Biscayne that was offered with up to 315 horsepower.

    The full-size Chevrolets joined the force in 1976. All Caprice police cars – including the new, 2011 model – have carried the 9C1 order code. Here’s a quick look back at Chevys on patrol:

    1959 – Chevy Biscayne police model capable of 135 mph with specially tuned, police-only version of the 348-cubic-inch V-8 engine

    1965 – The new “big-block” 396 engine is offered in Biscayne and Bel Air police cars, making them among the most powerful on patrol; a 427 V-8 was added in 1966

    1976 – The 9C1 order code is given for the first time to a full-size Chevy police car package. It carries the Impala name.

    1977 – The full-size Chevy is downsized. The 9C1 police package is retained, as is the Impala name.

    1986 – The Caprice name replaces Impala, as the car is updated for the mid- and late-1980s – including the option of a powerful, 5.7-liter small-block V-8.

    1991 – A new-generation Caprice is launched, with the 9C1 police car still on the beat.

    1994 – The 260-horsepower (194 Nm) LT1 V-8 engine is offered in the Caprice 9C1, making it one of the fastest full-size police cars ever offered.

    1996 – Caprice police car production ends, as GM’s full-size, body-on-frame car architecture is discontinued.

    2011 – The Caprice PPV returns to active duty.







  • #2
    I would be more than happy to try one..
    summer - winter - work

    Comment


    • #3
      Looks like the Impala.


      At least this time around it is rear wheel drive.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LT Dangle View Post
        Looks like the Impala.


        At least this time around it is rear wheel drive.
        Don't forget, it also has a 355hp V8 and is much larger than an Impala, too.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sexayyy. Glad they decided to keep the G8 body style alive.
          "Its not what you know, its what you can prove."-Training Day

          "Game on, bitches. Whoop whoop, flash the lights, pull it over."

          Comment


          • #6
            wish it looked more like a G8 and not a crappy Impala. granted the guts are better but the look is bleh on the outside.

            Comment


            • #7
              It looks like a Lumina on roids.

              M-11
              “All men dream...... But not equally..
              Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it is vanity;
              but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men,
              for they act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible.....”

              TE Lawrence

              Comment


              • #8
                Ladies & Gentlemen, apart from the interior fitout, this appears to be very similar in appearance to the Holden Commodore sedan (Holden is the Australian GM subsiduary) which we use as a General Duties and Highway Patrol car.

                The V6 goes like a cut snake and it sticks to the road like the proverbial baby 5h1t to a blanket. Our Traffic Branch are the only ones who use the V8 versions.

                I would love to have purpose built seats to cater for our duty belt, however our beancounters (penny pinchers) have decreed otherwise. The same goes for the onboard computers, work related gizmos, etc.

                As a side issue, we're slowly intoducing a General Accroutement Vest to reduce the amount of weight carried around our waists and thus reduce lower back pain in the long run. For those interested, the following site may be of use:

                http://www.thinkppc.com/Gav/GAV_Overview.pdf
                If at first you don't succeed, remove all evidence of your attempt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is it just me or do those tires and rims not look good on the Caprice? They just don't seem to fit with the overall look of the car. It looks like they're trying to stick 4 "donuts" on there. I do like the room for the double stack 12 Ga. and AR though.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This looks like a rebadged Pontiac G8 (a Holden Commodore), which GM said it was not going to make into a police patrol vehicle.

                    In fact, the source says: "Holden is coming back to the U.S!"
                    Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very nice. Sales will boost for GM; especially since Ford may be saying goodbye to the Crown Vic.
                      "Abandon your animosities and make your sons Americans." - Robert E. Lee, 1865

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Edmunds.com says it is a Holden Caprice:

                        DENVER — Bob Lutz said yes, Fritz Henderson said no, but it looks like somebody in the General Motors hierarchy relented and decided after all that General Motors should offer a new Chevrolet Caprice police package based on the automaker's rear-wheel-drive Zeta architecture.

                        So, in effect, the Holden-based Pontiac G8 sedan will live on — as the 2011 Caprice police car, which carries over sheetmetal and underbody components from the long-wheelbase Australian Holden Caprice, including a version of the massive 6.0-liter V8 that powers the high-performance Commodore SS.

                        The official announcement of the Chevrolet Caprice Police Patrol Vehicle was made Sunday at the annual convention of the International Association of Chiefs of Police here. GM said the Caprice PPV can be ordered next year (order code 9C1) for delivery in early 2011.

                        GM said the Caprice PPV will be available with a choice of V6 and V8 engines, including a flex-fuel 355-horsepower 6.0-liter unit with cylinder-cutoff technology that will have 0-to-60-mph acceleration in less than 6.0 seconds and class-leading top speed. The V6 will be offered at the beginning of the 2012 model year.

                        Other police-car-specific hardware includes heavy-duty suspension, standard 18-inch steel wheels, oversize four-wheel disc brakes with heavy-duty pads, police-calibrated stability control system, high-output alternator and heavy-duty coolers for engine oil, transmission and power steering.

                        We're assuming the usual assortment of lights, sirens, bells and whistles will also be offered.

                        http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...ticleId=158468
                        Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                        Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          With the console-mounted shifter, where is the keyboard for the computer? They need to mount the shifter on the steering column so we can put MDT/MCTs in there functionally, for those of us that have keyboard operated MCTs. I looked at the G8 civvie sedan, and it is a nice car. I would drive one. But I want the Camaro as my POV.
                          sigpic
                          Originally posted by Smurfette
                          Lord have mercy. You're about as slick as the business side of duct tape.
                          Originally posted by DAL
                          You are without doubt a void surrounded by a sphincter muscle.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FJDave View Post
                            With the console-mounted shifter, where is the keyboard for the computer? They need to mount the shifter on the steering column so we can put MDT/MCTs in there functionally, for those of us that have keyboard operated MCTs. I looked at the G8 civvie sedan, and it is a nice car. I would drive one. But I want the Camaro as my POV.
                            Agreed a hundred percent. Our agency doesn't have touch screens like the one seen in the photos. And I don't think we are getting any no time soon. The shifter needs to be on the steering column. That will be hard as helll trying to shift and type or type and shift during every stop.
                            "Abandon your animosities and make your sons Americans." - Robert E. Lee, 1865

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FJDave View Post
                              With the console-mounted shifter, where is the keyboard for the computer? They need to mount the shifter on the steering column so we can put MDT/MCTs in there functionally, for those of us that have keyboard operated MCTs. I looked at the G8 civvie sedan, and it is a nice car. I would drive one. But I want the Camaro as my POV.
                              How has LAPD set things up in its G8 test cars?
                              Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                              Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                              Comment

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