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  • Highway Patrol Safety

    I was driving home from school last night (around 10pm) on a small three lane freeway and saw a CHP cruiser with all of his lights off parked on the emergency lane.

    As soon as I came really close to his position my heart raced because I really didn't see him in the cover of night. I was in the no.3 lane and was not even close to him but wow somebody could have hit him going 70mph at any given moment.

    I was just wondering how many highway patrol officers do that to catch someone speeding at night? I was under the impression most highway patrol officers do more traffic enforcement in the daytime and mainly drive around to watch for DUIs and such at night. (feel free to correct me if i'm wrong)




    And i'm reporting this officer to his supervisor on how to do his job properly!
    ( just a little "deer dispatched in city limits" joke )







    Futurelaw89

  • #2
    Originally posted by Futurelaw89 View Post
    I was driving home from school last night (around 10pm) on a small three lane freeway and saw a CHP cruiser with all of his lights off parked on the emergency lane.

    As soon as I came really close to his position my heart raced because I really didn't see him in the cover of night. I was in the no.3 lane and was not even close to him but wow somebody could have hit him going 70mph at any given moment.

    I was just wondering how many highway patrol officers do that to catch someone speeding at night? I was under the impression most highway patrol officers do more traffic enforcement in the daytime and mainly drive around to watch for DUIs and such at night. (feel free to correct me if i'm wrong)




    And i'm reporting this officer to his supervisor on how to do his job properly!
    ( just a little "deer dispatched in city limits" joke )







    Futurelaw89
    The deer incident? LOL, took four rounds cuz the Cop was using security guard ammo

    The CHP as do most Cops who work traffic are keenly aware of their surroundings. Lots of things that may seem "unsafe" they perform daily
    "a band is blowing Dixie double four time You feel alright when you hear the music ring"


    The real deal

    Outshined Pujulesfan Bearcat Chitowndet Sgt Slaughter jthorpe M-11 Lt Borelli L-1Sgt CHP Nikk Smurf Presence1 IcecoldblueyesKimble LADEP ateamer ChiCity R.A.B. Jenners IrishMetal GoldBadge willowdared Monkeybomb PhilipCal pullicords Chit2001 Garbageman Narco CruiserClass Fuzz 10-42Trooper Tex4720 irishlad2nv bajakirch OnThe gurmpyirishmanNYIlliniSgtScott31 CityCopDCcgh6366 FJDave

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by RoadKingTrooper View Post
      The deer incident? LOL, took four rounds cuz the Cop was using security guard ammo

      The CHP as do most Cops who work traffic are keenly aware of their surroundings. Lots of things that may seem "unsafe" they perform daily
      X-2.W/added thought. No such thing as a risk free environment.

      Comment


      • #4
        Unfortunately, it comes with the job.

        Comment


        • #5
          Highway Patrol Safety


          Well, at least he was inside the cruiser.

          A few years back, I remember driving on I-270 in Maryland and the state police were doing heavy speed enforcement one afternoon. They were measuring speed of approaching vehicles (with radar, I assume) and would catch one going too fast (very easy to do on that stretch of road that is posted at a ridiculously low 55 mph).

          A trooper would then step out into the lane of travel and wave red flags to get the speeder to pull over and stop so Mr. Leadfoot could make a contribution to the state treasury. With so few people actually paying attention to driving, that is probably not a great idea. You can bet that a lot of people will be looking at the patrol car and the pretty lights instead of at the trooper trying to get their attention.


          Maybe they don't do that anymore, but jeepers! Our sheriff would never have wanted (or allowed) us to do that.

          I know other states did that stuff from time to time, but I have not seen such tactics practiced for a long time (thankfully). I assume that the CHP trooper you mention is using a 'regular' spot for monitoring traffic. Every cop has his favorite "fishing hole" and you may have discovered his. If you slowed down when you saw him, then him being there was proven to be effective.

          The comments above reflect my personal opinion as a private citizen, ordinary motorist and all-around good guy.

          The aforementioned advice should not be construed to represent any type of professional opinion, legal counsel or other type of instruction with regard to traffic laws, judicial proceedings or official agency policy.

          ------------------------------------------------

          "Ignorance on fire is hotter than knowledge on ice."

          Comment


          • #6
            I doubt he was looking for speeders. More likely he was finishing up a citation, doing paperwork from a crash or waiting for another unit to follow up on a matter.

            Sitting there with your lights out has it's own unique logic. Believe it or not, it's for officer safety.

            Although CHP has been around for half as long as the Los Angeles Police Department, it has lost just about as many officers in the line of duty as LAPD. Surprisingly, more than half were not been killed by weapons or assaults. Instead, they died in vehicle accidents.

            When approaching drivers see a vehicle at the side of the road at night with emergency lights activated, or just with their tail lights on, they tend to focus on those lights rather than on the road. It's human nature - they are curious and want to see what is going on and they believe that by focusing on the lights they will keep from driving into the vehicle. However, by taking their eyes off the road ahead, they often fail to notice that they are leaving their lane and drifting towards the vehicle they are watching. Many emergency vehicles and their operators (law enforcement, ambulance, fire, tow truck, CalTrans) have been struck and killed by other drivers whose attention was captured by and drawn to the lights. As a result, a lot of Chippies who are stopped for whatever reason and are not wandering out on the roadway itself, will pull as far off to the side as possible and simply black out.
            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Futurelaw89 View Post
              I was driving home from school last night (around 10pm) on a small three lane freeway and saw a CHP cruiser with all of his lights off parked on the emergency lane.

              As soon as I came really close to his position my heart raced because I really didn't see him in the cover of night. I was in the no.3 lane and was not even close to him but wow somebody could have hit him going 70mph at any given moment.

              I was just wondering how many highway patrol officers do that to catch someone speeding at night? I was under the impression most highway patrol officers do more traffic enforcement in the daytime and mainly drive around to watch for DUIs and such at night. (feel free to correct me if i'm wrong)




              And i'm reporting this officer to his supervisor on how to do his job properly!
              ( just a little "deer dispatched in city limits" joke )







              Futurelaw89

              You concerns are exactly why this law was enacted and will, in all liklihood, be renewed:

              Stationary Emergency Vehicle or Tow Truck

              21809. (a) A person driving a vehicle on a freeway approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle that is displaying emergency lights, or a stationary tow truck that is displaying flashing amber warning lights, shall approach with due caution and, before passing in a lane immediately adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle or tow truck, absent any other direction by a peace officer, proceed to do one of the following:

              (1) Make a lane change into an available lane not immediately adjacent to the authorized emergency vehicle or tow truck with due regard for safety and traffic conditions, if practicable and not prohibited by law.

              (2) If the maneuver described in paragraph (1) would be unsafe or impracticable, slow to a reasonable and prudent speed that is safe for existing weather, road, and vehicular or pedestrian traffic conditions.

              (b) A violation of subdivision (a) is an infraction, punishable by a fine of not more than fifty dollars ($50).

              (c) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2010, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2010, deletes or extends that date.

              Added Sec. 2, Ch. 375, Stats. 2006. Effective January 1, 2007.
              NOTE: The preceding section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2010, and as of that date is repealed.
              Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

              [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

              Comment


              • #8
                the term moth to flame comes to mind, when your lights are on, you tend to attract more knuckleheads. IMHO

                Comment


                • #9
                  I got whacked once in broad daylight, on the grass NEXT to the shoulder, with all the lights on, by a driver that came from the 4th lane (farthest from me), and missed EVERYONE in all the other lanes before connecting with the cruiser. If its gonna happen, its gonna happen....
                  "The wicked flee when no man pursueth
                  but the righteous are bold as a lion"

                  Proverbs 28:1, inscription beneath NLEOM lion.sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My Force REQUIRES us to wear high-visibility (neon green/yellow with silver reflective front vertical and rear x-crossed striping and silver lettering) vests or jackets when conducting traffic enforcement. Vests are issued to ALL our Cadets in training since about 2 years, and are to be supplied to all experienced members that graduated before that, while the jackets are restricted to Traffic Unit members. Not all non-Traffic Unit investigators, however, bother putting their vests on before doing traffic stops, even when they are conducting specific traffic enforcement patrols.

                    The law in Saskatchewan is that other traffic can NOT exceed 60 km / hr when passing a road construction crew (with flag person), or tow (yellow lights), EMS (red and white), fire (red) or law enforcement (red and blue) vehicle that is stopped on the road with their emergency lights on. This applies to both directions of travel, unless on a divided highway with depressed or raised barrier between, then only the same-direction must comply.

                    Fines for above are $140 PLUS $2 (< / = 30 over) or $4 (> 30 over) for every km / hr PLUS a $50, $60 or $80 victim fund surcharge (for < / = $200, > $200 < / = $350 or > $350 < / = $500 fine) PLUS demerit points (causing either a loss of reduction in the amount paid for registration and insurance, or a requirement to pay an administrative penalty with failure to do so causing revocation of your drivers licence). This is the same fine structure for Exceed Speed in School / Playground Zone.

                    I am on a Traffic Unit, so have both a vest and a jacket; our motorcycle operators have a similar type of padded / armoured riding jacket. We also have regular duty dark blue jackets if we respond to a night shooting or otherwise have to go covert.

                    What I have been trying to do lately at night is get my "clients" to turn off their headlights so that on-coming drivers' vision of my emergency lights is not blocked. I also try to leave a LARGE safety pocket for myself, positioning my patrol vehicle parallel to the road, into the near lane with the centre of my hood in line with the outside rear corner of the "client" vehicle, which is, hopefully as far over onto the shoulder, or out of the travel lane, as much as possible.

                    It scares the crap out of me when I pass emergency vehicles being operated by investigators who are NOT wearing their high-visibility gear and ONLY see them at the last minute!
                    #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                    Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                    RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                    Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                    "Smile" - no!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      At night, a drunk sees tail lights ahead of him and instinctively thinks, "I better follow those tail light." He/she will only follow for a little until he plows into the rear of your car.

                      I prefer to stay blacked out, however, when I'm on the shoulder, I am usually far enough over, I'm partially in the grass.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                        I doubt he was looking for speeders. More likely he was finishing up a citation, doing paperwork from a crash or waiting for another unit to follow up on a matter.

                        Sitting there with your lights out has it's own unique logic. Believe it or not, it's for officer safety.

                        Although CHP has been around for half as long as the Los Angeles Police Department, it has lost just about as many officers in the line of duty as LAPD. Surprisingly, more than half were not been killed by weapons or assaults. Instead, they died in vehicle accidents.

                        When approaching drivers see a vehicle at the side of the road at night with emergency lights activated, or just with their tail lights on, they tend to focus on those lights rather than on the road. It's human nature - they are curious and want to see what is going on and they believe that by focusing on the lights they will keep from driving into the vehicle. However, by taking their eyes off the road ahead, they often fail to notice that they are leaving their lane and drifting towards the vehicle they are watching. Many emergency vehicles and their operators (law enforcement, ambulance, fire, tow truck, CalTrans) have been struck and killed by other drivers whose attention was captured by and drawn to the lights. As a result, a lot of Chippies who are stopped for whatever reason and are not wandering out on the roadway itself, will pull as far off to the side as possible and simply black out.
                        As the Lt says, and Sgt CHP confirms.........others as well

                        There is a saying among skiers......."the hands follow the eyes"

                        New requirements for our Dept? Troopers must wear reflective vests and have emergency equipment on when out of the car for an extended length of time on any US highway.

                        Thoughts? It is a stupid although well intentioned rule thought up by a Federal bureaucrat who obviously has NEVER worked traffic on a highway!

                        RKT
                        "a band is blowing Dixie double four time You feel alright when you hear the music ring"


                        The real deal

                        Outshined Pujulesfan Bearcat Chitowndet Sgt Slaughter jthorpe M-11 Lt Borelli L-1Sgt CHP Nikk Smurf Presence1 IcecoldblueyesKimble LADEP ateamer ChiCity R.A.B. Jenners IrishMetal GoldBadge willowdared Monkeybomb PhilipCal pullicords Chit2001 Garbageman Narco CruiserClass Fuzz 10-42Trooper Tex4720 irishlad2nv bajakirch OnThe gurmpyirishmanNYIlliniSgtScott31 CityCopDCcgh6366 FJDave

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by VA Dutch View Post

                          Well, at least he was inside the cruiser.

                          A few years back, I remember driving on I-270 in Maryland and the state police were doing heavy speed enforcement one afternoon. They were measuring speed of approaching vehicles (with radar, I assume) and would catch one going too fast (very easy to do on that stretch of road that is posted at a ridiculously low 55 mph).

                          A trooper would then step out into the lane of travel and wave red flags to get the speeder to pull over and stop so Mr. Leadfoot could make a contribution to the state treasury. With so few people actually paying attention to driving, that is probably not a great idea. You can bet that a lot of people will be looking at the patrol car and the pretty lights instead of at the trooper trying to get their attention.


                          Maybe they don't do that anymore, but jeepers! Our sheriff would never have wanted (or allowed) us to do that.

                          I know other states did that stuff from time to time, but I have not seen such tactics practiced for a long time (thankfully). I assume that the CHP trooper you mention is using a 'regular' spot for monitoring traffic. Every cop has his favorite "fishing hole" and you may have discovered his. If you slowed down when you saw him, then him being there was proven to be effective.

                          This happens alot in Maryland for some reaon, I live in Annapolis, right in the heart of maryland and have seen it on every highway at least 15 times each

                          "Der Schmerz ist vorübergehend, Stolz ist für immer"


                          Comment

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