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Interesting way to get out of a speeding ticket.

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  • Interesting way to get out of a speeding ticket.

    The article itself isn't that interesting. I just cracked up looking at this goofball wearing a clowns mask just to get out of a speeding ticket.



    Dave Vontesmar hates photo enforcement.

    Vontesmar drives nearly 30 miles a day from his home in north Phoenix to his job at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and passes through the photo-enforcement gantlet on Interstate 17, Arizona 51 and Interstate 10.

    But when state Department of Public Safety officers served 37 unpaid photo-enforcement tickets to Vontesmar recently, he wasn't fazed.

    The photos all show the driver wearing a monkey mask.

    "Not one of them there is a picture where you can identify the driver," Vontesmar said. "The ball's in their court. I sent back all these ones I got with a copy of my driver's license and said, 'It's not me. I'm not paying them.' "

    The latest data from the DPS shows more motorists are disregarding the violation notices upon arrival in the mail.

    When the system was just getting set up in October, 34 percent of drivers paid their tickets. By June, that statistic had dropped to 24 percent.


    Program effects

    DPS officials repeatedly point out that the success of the photo-enforcement program is not measured in revenue it generates - about $20 million for the state through the end of July - or the number of notices of violation issued.

    "Our whole goal is not to issue tickets, just to get people to drive the speed limit," Lt. Jeff King said.

    King instead prefers to focus on the program's positive effects on Arizona's highways, particularly in the Valley where fatalities, a factor that closely correlates with speed in wrecks, have dropped by 10 to 20 percent since the same time last year. His anecdotal evidence also points to drivers slowing down.

    "The whole purpose behind it is voluntary compliance, and (the cameras) work really good," King said.

    DPS statistics support the notion that the program is slowing some drivers down, too. Photo-enforcement cameras activated about 78,000 fewer times in July than in December, though King notes other factors such as the economy could have contributed to fewer drivers being on the road.

    King said there are plenty of people who willfully disregard the violations that arrive in the mail, generated by the 78 fixed and mobile units around the state.

    DPS officers target such drivers, dubbed frequent fliers, who have 15 or more active violations. King said that number could fluctuate from 100 to 600 motorists.

    Drivers have 30 days to respond to a notice of violation after it arrives in the mail. Motorists can either pay the fine, challenge the ticket or inform the DPS that the recipient is not the driver and return the paperwork with a copy of their driver's license. Drivers who challenge tickets could end up in Justice Court.

    Those who ignore the notice may be served with a hand-delivered ticket.


    A case in point

    Vontesmar, a flight attendant, chose to inform the DPS that he was not driving when confronted with the 37 violations at his job three weeks ago. DPS officials estimate the car registered in Vontesmar's name was caught by cameras more than 90 times, but time had lapsed on the majority of violations by the time officers tracked Vontesmar down.

    Vontesmar is confident that he won't have to pay the fines, an amount that could exceed $6,500.

    "It's obviously a revenue grab," he said of the program. "They're required by law to ID the driver of the vehicle. If they can't identify the driver or the vehicle by the picture, what are they doing to identify the driver?"

    Typically, the DPS uses driver's-license photos and vehicle registration to confirm the identity of motorists, but there is a special unit assigned to go after frequent fliers.

    In this case, officers sat outside Vontesmar's home and watched him drive to work. "We watched him four different times put the monkey mask on and put the giraffe-style mask on," Officer Dave Porter said. "Based on surveillance, we were positive that Vontesmar was the driver."

    Porter said that it would be up to justices of the peace to determine what to do with Vontesmar's tickets, but the officer said there is enough evidence to reissue the tickets in Vontesmar's name, despite his claims that he was not the driver.

    Some frequent speeders cover their faces, use post-office boxes or fictitious addresses to beat the system, said Officer Jeff Hawkins, who is working 50 such cases.

    "They generally do it under the pretext that they're not going to be caught," he said. "These are what you probably consider as people who don't really respect the law at all."

  • #2
    "Vontesmar, a flight attendant, chose to inform the DPS that he was not driving when confronted with the 37 violations at his job three weeks ago. DPS officials estimate the car registered in Vontesmar's name was caught by cameras more than 90 times, but time had lapsed on the majority of violations by the time officers tracked Vontesmar down.

    Vontesmar is confident that he won't have to pay the fines, an amount that could exceed $6,500.

    "It's obviously a revenue grab," he said of the program. "They're required by law to ID the driver of the vehicle. If they can't identify the driver or the vehicle by the picture, what are they doing to identify the driver?"

    This guy's driving (or that of those he's allowing to drive his vehicle) presents a danger to himself and all those on the public road around him. His license to drive and the registration to his vehicle should be immediately suspended/revoked. Driving is a privilege and so is allowing a vehicle to be operated on a public street. They are not rights and if anyone deserves having those privileges taken away, it's this clown.

    Regardless of whether or not the criminal violations can be proved beyond a reasonable doubt, an administrative hearing with DMV should keep this guy and his car off the road!
    Last edited by pulicords; 09-08-2009, 01:36 PM.
    "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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    • #3
      I wonder if Arizona has a law similar to Californias?

      California Penal Code Section 185

      (185.) Section One Hundred and Eighty-five. It shall be unlawful
      for any person to wear any mask, false whiskers, or any personal
      disguise (whether complete or partial) for the purpose of:

      One--Evading or escaping discovery, recognition, or identification
      in the commission of any public offense.

      Two--Concealment, flight, or escape, when charged with, arrested
      for, or convicted of, any public offense. Any person violating any
      of the provisions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a
      misdemeanor.
      Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

      [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

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      • #4
        I've gone on record, at least on our forums, as not being a big fan of photo enforcement. My major problem is with red light camera's. That said, this situation represents the other side of the issue. The law provides a means to contest the citation, that 's the avenue this gentleman should take. He's made the statement that the ball is Arizona DPS' court. It won't be there for long, and our flight attendant could very well be taking public transportation to work, or car pooling as a passenger. I'm familiar the area in question (I-10 Pheonix), as I make an annual driving trip to Los Angeles. Simple compliance with the law is the far more simple option here. And, as has been correctly noted, driving is a privilege, not a right.

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        • #5
          I, for one, am very glad that this (photo speed enforcement) isn't even remotely legal in CA..........the red light cameras need to go as well.

          This is about making $$$$......if it wasn't about making $$$$, then why do the elected officials get on the radio and snivel when the expected REVENUE goes down?

          That being said, if you KNOW the cameras are there, why tempt fate?
          The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

          "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

          "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

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          • #6
            Ya gotta admit that's pretty funny ...
            Thank you to all of you who serve as men and women in law enforcement - we sleep better at night because of your dedication to duty!

            Comment


            • #7
              The easy fix is to make photo enforcement a non-moving violation. That would prohibit the taking of the license due to the tickets, but still leave the person owning the vehicle responsible for the fine, similar to a parking ticket. The DL could be suspended for failure to pay the tickets, but not for the number of tickets received. The only defense is for the owner to provide the identity of the driver or produce a stolen vehicle report.
              But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new guards for their future security.

              For the intelectually challenged: If the government screws the people enough, it is the right and responsibility of the people to revolt and form a new government.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kc12 View Post
                The easy fix is to make photo enforcement a non-moving violation. That would prohibit the taking of the license due to the tickets, but still leave the person owning the vehicle responsible for the fine, similar to a parking ticket. The DL could be suspended for failure to pay the tickets, but not for the number of tickets received. The only defense is for the owner to provide the identity of the driver or produce a stolen vehicle report.
                That's what I was thinking.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Monkey man is my hero.

                  Damn dirty photo radar.

                  Photo radar is a joke. Tell me how you feel the first time you get a photo radar cite IN YOUR MARKED PATROL CAR, ON DUTY AT 0300 HOURS, DRIVING 68 MPH ON THE FREEWAY.

                  Or you cross an oncoming vehicle you need to get a closer look at. You whip a u-turn and accelerate to catch the car. *FLASH* *FLASH* *FLASH* and you get cited for 57 mph in a 45 mph zone.

                  These are totally f__king reasonable speeds for a patrol officer, on duty.

                  Law enforcement was privatized for profit, and I hope whomever initiated it will spend an eternity burning in the fires of hell with a thousand teeth gnashing at their flesh.

                  Luckily I have a command staff that understands to some degree that the photo cites indicate that I'm out prowling and hunting for crime (and not parked under a tree sleeping). I haven't been found financially responsible, yet, but I still get my butt chewed and have to write memos.

                  I will not to "salute" the camera...
                  I will not to point my spotlight at the camera...
                  I will not tow the photo vans as abandoned vehicles...
                  I will not wear a bandana over my face while driving...

                  I've not done that specifically, but other cops I know have been told it.
                  "Too many times, too many times payin' the price, just for the thrill" - Tesla

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DaisyCutter View Post
                    I will not wear a bandana over my face while driving...

                    I've not done that specifically, but other cops I know have been told it.
                    Personally, I dont see what the problem is...

                    -------------------------------
                    You can't fix stupid, but you can arrest it. - LINY

                    "Their house, their rules. And when they get robbed, they can call 911 and ask them to send a hippie to protect them." - ateamer

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SgtCHP View Post
                      I wonder if Arizona has a law similar to Californias?

                      California Penal Code Section 185
                      You beat me to it. I was thinking that very same thing.
                      _____________
                      "Corruptisima republica plurimae leges."

                      "The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws."
                      - Cornelius Tacitus

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DaisyCutter View Post
                        I will not tow the photo vans as abandoned vehicles...
                        I laughed pretty hard with this one...
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Seems like a reason to take the plates off your car.
                          Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                          Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

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