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Police Officer vs. Sheriff's Deputy vs. Deputy Constable & equal respect between them

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  • Police Officer vs. Sheriff's Deputy vs. Deputy Constable & equal respect between them

    I have a question that I am unable to find here on the boards already. Probably because it may be a dumb question, but I’d like to know your opinions.

    Many states, cities, towns, etc. have different LE agencies. For example Washington, DC doesn’t have a Sheriff nor Deputies. Many states don’t have Constables.

    My question is, when on travel or in an area outside your own, does the title Sheriff’s Deputy (or Constable) receive the same “respect” as the title “Police Officer”? I know that in most areas the titles do pretty much the same work.

    But an area, that doesn’t have Sheriff's Deputies (Constables, etc.) or their Sheriff’s Deputies do predominantly a jail/courthouse function, would the title (Deputy/Constable), from another area, be respected by the local Police as equal LEO?

    Now, I understand that if an area doesn’t have Sheriffs or Constables the local “Police Officer” may not understand the role of a Sheriff or Constable Deputy and may make the mistake of seeing the title as something less than a full and equal LEO.

    And, this question extends onto Police to Police respect, where State, County, and City “Police Officers” having equal respect for a Community College or Hospital Police Officer.

    I travel a WHOLE lot (like 3 weeks a month). And I over heard a conversation between two guys on this topic that made me feel very uneasy. Based on the conversation I’d feel confident in venturing that at least 1 if not both were LEO’s.

    I would hate to think that if I were a Deputy Constable on travel to an area that doesn’t have Constables, that I would be treated, especially in terms of LEOSA/HR218, without respect and my badge not honored (at least without a lot of rig-a-ma-row) .
    Last edited by breezy062; 03-31-2009, 09:30 PM. Reason: spelling error
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  • #2
    I'll try and answer your question it's kinda confusing though.

    Sheriff/Deputy = Most everwhere in the county

    Police/Officer = Most everywhere in the city

    I'm not familiar with constable sorry.

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    • #3
      I apologize, for the confusion…I can definitely be loquacious at times.

      I am pretty familiar with the jobs and primary duties of the Police vs. Sheriffs vs. Constables (Texas has all 3). Bottom line is, do Police Officers (that don’t have Sheriff or Constables in their area) respect Sheriff’s and Constable Deputies as equal LEO’s?

      Or is there a “Andy Griffin/Mayberry” prejudice for the titles Deputy & Constable or Community College & Hospital Officer? In your own opinion…
      DPD (Rookie)
      39 y/o
      M.S. Business Admin. & Information Systems
      PhD Student (CJ/HLS) program
      NRA Instructor

      "Buy on the rumor... sell on the news"
      "If life has taught me anything it’s that 95% of the people are always wrong.”
      "Success = doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing"

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      • #4
        We dont have constables here, but police officers and deputy sheriffs preform basically the same functions. The difference is the areas that they serve. Police officers are responsible for the incorporated areas of a county, while the sheriffs department is responsible for the county overall. Because the incorporated areas for the most part have city cops, the deputies tend to be in primarily rural areas. There's certainly exceptions to that, and it is not uncommon to see a sheriffs deputy on a traffic stop in the city, etc. There are also plenty of unincorporated areas nearby that are adjacent to and basically part of a city, but the sheriff patrols these areas.

        I doubt that most non-LEOs even know or notice the difference between agencies.

        And I doubt (can't say for sure I'm not LEO) that the city cops and sheriffs deputies see each other as anything but equals.
        son, if you keep this up, soon you'll inherit the family mullet!

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        • #5
          I give them all the same respect. If they wear a badge, they're my brothers.
          Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

          I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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          • #6
            Originally posted by switcher
            Some large east coast areas (such as New York City) don't have deputy sheriffs as we know them here in California, Texas, and what not. Their deputy sheriffs mainly do evictions (not even court security...that's another department). So I definitely can see some confusion/lack of respect.
            I was going to say the same thing. In my state, Deputies and Constables are agents of the court and typically perform warrant service and prisoner transport. I don't believe my state recognizes them on the same level as LEOs and they are not covered under HR218, which is sad. That being said, since street patrol in my state is covered by either local police, county police, or state police, I think there are some officers who would not understand that Deputies and Constables in other states perform full LE functions. Therefore, you may have some less worldly officers who may not not give them the full respect they deserve, but I definitely don't think that would be the norm.
            "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." -Edmund Burke

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            • #7
              Sheriffs= mainly unincorporated parts of county and even a city at times
              Police=within city limits
              Constables=whereever they want to go, but mainly in their pct
              "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called Sons of God - Matthew 5:9

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Taylor13 View Post
                I'll try and answer your question it's kinda confusing though.

                Sheriff/Deputy = Most everwhere in the county
                In Florida, it is everywhere in the county. But, if a city has it's own police, then the Sheriff generally only responds when requested.
                Police/Officer = Most everywhere in the city

                I'm not familiar with constable sorry.
                In Florida, every sheriff's office is a full service agency. That means the S.O. performs the same function as a municipal agency, as well as additional duties mandated by the state constitution. The Sheriff derives their power from the state constitution, whereas a police chief derives his/her power from a city charter.

                The Sheriff is the top law enforcement officer in the county in our state. We don't have "county police" here.
                Airborne Cops are closer to God.
                Arms and legs are just extensions of flight controls.

                THESE BIG RED LETTERS HELP ME FIND MY POST.

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                • #9
                  It all varies from state to state and agency to agency.Depending on the state,the Sheriff's Department is a large full service agency (i.e. California,Nevada,Florida,Texas,etc.)and well respected.In some states, the Sheriff's Department is relegated to running the county jail and is not terribly respected (Massachusetts).Some states don't even have Sheriff's.
                  The same can be said for State Police/Highway Patrol.In the eastern states like Massachusetts,Rhode Island,New Jersey etc., "state police" are highly respected full service agencies that patrol state properties,provide mutual aid to smaller agencies,patrol rural areas,and conduct major investigations.In other states,especially in the south and west "highway patrol" are generally limited to just that ,although some states also have a "state bureau of investigation".

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChopperCopper View Post
                    In Florida, every sheriff's office is a full service agency. That means the S.O. performs the same function as a municipal agency, as well as additional duties mandated by the state constitution. The Sheriff derives their power from the state constitution, whereas a police chief derives his/her power from a city charter.

                    The Sheriff is the top law enforcement officer in the county in our state. We don't have "county police" here.
                    This illustrates the fact that there seems to be a regional difference with respect to which agencies are the premier LE agency in a given jurisdiction w/ overlapping responsibilities. In FL, the Sheriff's run everything - they are usually large and they usually have more resources than the local PD's to handle difficult/complex cases that require criminal investigative work.

                    In Illinois (for example), that is generally not the case. The local pd's generally run things in the corporate city limits while the sheriff's agencies are usually smaller and handle the unincorporated/rural areas.

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                    • #11
                      We have all 3. Sheriff Deputies, Police Officers, and Constables go through the exact same academy and have the exact same powers except constables get state wide jurisdiction. City/Town police only work in the areas of the County they annexed. Sheriff's Deputies can take calls anywhere in the County including areas annexed by the City or Town.


                      Now Constables are Police Officers certified by the state, thus it gives them state wide jurisdiction. Usually College police have this title. Sheriff's Deputies and Police officers can become constables to make cases/arrests outside their jurisdiction but the department has to go through some process to get this done, I am not sure exactly what they have to do.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DeputySC View Post
                        We have all 3. Sheriff Deputies, Police Officers, and Constables go through the exact same academy and have the exact same powers except constables get state wide jurisdiction. City/Town police only work in the areas of the County they annexed. Sheriff's Deputies can take calls anywhere in the County including areas annexed by the City or Town.


                        Now Constables are Police Officers certified by the state, thus it gives them state wide jurisdiction. Usually College police have this title. Sheriff's Deputies and Police officers can become constables to make cases/arrests outside their jurisdiction but the department has to go through some process to get this done, I am not sure exactly what they have to do.
                        Actually, not quite, in South Carolina, Constables are an auxiliary police function, they do not have full C-1 Certification, and they do not attend the SCJCA as do all other police in SC, they take the Basic Constable Training course at a technical college.They operate under supervision of the chief of the South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division (SLED), under Executive Orders 90-08 and 99-18, South Carolina State Constable is not a stand-alone law enforcement department. It is the purpose of the Constable to assist and augment local law enforcement agency personnel efforts.
                        Last edited by Magic Matt; 04-01-2009, 10:00 PM.
                        Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

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                        • #13
                          To answer your question; yes we know who’s who and respect each other for the most part. The Credentials of any sworn law enforcement officer will state that they have “arrest authority” and that says it all.
                          Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

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                          • #14
                            Andy Griffith, Peter Griffin

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                            • #15



                              Switcher, why do you keep posting the same thing in all the threads you visit?
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                              Servicing what feels like one giant Mental Hospital......... going on 3 years.

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