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  • Working in law enforcement with diabetes

    Just this morning, I received a call from my doctor telling me that I was diabetic. I was shocked when I heard the news. I am still in disbelief, but I am glad that I have found out early. So now I am in the process of making major life style changes. I was wondering if having diabetes will affect my chances of becoming a police officer? Also, if you are an LEO or know an LEO with diabetes, how does this affect your career and performance? I am sure that this is not the end of life, it could always be worse. Any input I could get from you all would be great. Thank you.
    The pain you endured yesterday and today makes for a great tomorrow.

  • #2
    There was a cadet in my academy class that had type 2 diabetes and needed to inject herself every morning. It didn't affect her performance much from what I saw and she is now working full time.

    As long as you watch your health you should be fine.

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    • #3
      Unfortunately, that is one of the disqualifying ailments in most CA agencies. In fact, if you contract the ailment while you are a sworn officer on the CHP, you will be separated from the department.

      It can become a detriment in a high stress situation where the adrenaline is flowing and pancreas has to work overtime.
      Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

      [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SgtCHP View Post
        Unfortunately, that is one of the disqualifying ailments in most CA agencies. In fact, if you contract the ailment while you are a sworn officer on the CHP, you will be separated from the department.

        It can become a detriment in a high stress situation where the adrenaline is flowing and pancreas has to work overtime.
        Hey Sarge, not calling you a liar, but do you have the links to where it shows that diabetes is a DQ'ing factor? I'm especially curious as to being bumped from CHP if you contract this while an employee. That doesn't seem legal.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by InHarleyCop View Post
          Hey Sarge, not calling you a liar, but do you have the links to where it shows that diabetes is a DQ'ing factor? I'm especially curious as to being bumped from CHP if you contract this while an employee. That doesn't seem legal.
          First, let me point out that I take umbridge at the fact you would even consider that I would lie about any information that I post to help those who wish to become a LEO.

          Now, that aside, I will point out that I do not have access to the listing of disqualifying ailments; however, these references are from the CHP recruiting information:

          Health:
          Good health. Must be free from any physical, mental or emotional condition that would prohibit the full performance of all the essential duties and functions of a CHP officer.
          This is from the application for Cadet - the first process in becoming a candidate for the CHP.

          Medical Examination: The medical examination is performed by a licensed physician. Because of the essential duties of the position, there are several potential causes for medical disqualification: back defects revealed by x-ray, history of back difficulty, problems with digestion, any cardiovascular abnormality, pelvic bone or tissue abnormalities, or any nervous or emotional disorder.
          I have personally seen officers separated from the department because of their onset of insulin dependant diabetes. I know that we have lost many candidates for the department because of their illness.

          The department and State consider insulin dependant candidates a liability. As I stated in a previous post the stress levels can be so severe as to trigger a diabetic reaction and can be detrimental to both the officer and his/her partners.

          If you doubt my answer, please feel free to call the Cadet Hiring Unit at
          (916) 375-2180 and ask one of them. If their answer to your query is different than mine and your application is accepted, I will gleefully apologize for providing errant information.

          By the way, diabetes is considered a cardiovascular ailment:

          This statement examines the cardiovascular complications of diabetes mellitus and considers opportunities for their prevention. These complications include coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, peripheral arterial disease, nephropathy, retinopathy, and possibly neuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Because of the aging of the population and an increasing prevalence of obesity and sedentary life habits in the United States, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Thus, diabetes must take its place alongside the other major risk factors as important causes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In fact, from the point of view of cardiovascular medicine, it may be appropriate to say, "diabetes is a cardiovascular disease."
          http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/cont...ll/100/10/1134
          Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

          [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by InHarleyCop View Post
            Hey Sarge, not calling you a liar, but do you have the links to where it shows that diabetes is a DQ'ing factor? I'm especially curious as to being bumped from CHP if you contract this while an employee. That doesn't seem legal.
            The implications for job performance can be found here:

            http://www.post.ca.gov/selection/pdf/Endo.pdf

            FWIW, I was diagnosed with diabetes nine years ago. I didn't think too much of it and never told anyone because I was working an admin assignment and had no idea as to how it could affect me.

            I have since retired and am now aware of the adverse impact it can have if you engage in unexpected, strenuous exercise at a moment of low blood sugar, or when you have just taken insulin in anticipation of eating a meal, only to be interrupted by an unexpected altercation or foot chase.

            If you read the POST study at the above link, you will find a surprising list of problems that can result from this condition.
            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

            Comment


            • #7
              As some one that has low blood sugar I can tell you just standing up too fast when its low can make you dizzy. IF I got out of a squad, for say a speeding ticket and that happen, it would be a big GO for the BG if thats who is in the car I stopped.
              ‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’
              Oscar Wilde

              Comment


              • #8
                Diabetes is not an auto DQ in Iowa nor is it a career ender if you develop diabetes while employed as a LEO.

                I don't recall any departments that make a big deal out of diabetes as long as it is under control. Many yrs ago I shift partnered with an insulin dependant diabetic on patrol -----for the most part we forgot he had the condition.....except we could tell when he was having problems, and made sure he took care of himself. He retired about 18 months ago after 28 yrs on duty as an active LEO.

                I know several diabetics who are current officers and several who have since retired (partial reason for retirement could have been their medical condition....note the term PARTIAL REASON)
                Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dex_P, Diabetes is not an end all to a law enforcement career. I'm a type 1 diabetic, who takes 5-6 shots a day depending on how many meals I eat. I got it early in my LE career and I told myself I was going to control it, not it control me.

                  The main thing you have to do is be proactive. Eat right (Count Your Carbs), work out daily, test you blood sugar, listen to your body and go to your doctor regularly. Keep Glucose tablets with you at all times. What I do when I'm at work, is eat 1st then take my insulin just in case I get called away to an in-progress call.

                  I'm on our SWAT Team and have been on numerous operations from high risk warrants to barricaded persons that last for hours. I keep glucose tablets on my entry vest just in case, but I haven't need them.

                  My agency has been very understanding and supportive of my situation. I couldn't work for a better agency.

                  You can have a great LE career as long as some agency will give you a chance. Good Luck and if you have any other questions don't hesistate to ask.
                  Last edited by Rush817; 02-20-2009, 07:48 PM.
                  Strong Body, Sharp Mind And Good Tactics!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rush817 View Post
                    Dex_P, Diabetes is not an end all to a law enforcement career. I'm a type 1 diabetic, who takes 5-6 shots a day depending on how many meals I eat. I got it early in my LE career and I told myself I was going to control it, not it control me.

                    The main thing you have to do is be proactive. Eat right (Count Your Carbs), work out daily, test you blood sugar, listen to your body and go to your doctor regularly. Keep Glucose tablets with you at all times. What I do when I'm at work, is eat 1st then take my insulin just in case I get called away to an in-progress call.

                    I'm on our SWAT Team and have been on numerous operations from high risk warrants to barricaded persons that last for hours. I keep glucose tablets on my entry vest just in case, but I haven't need them.

                    My agency has been very understanding and supportive of my situation. I couldn't work for a better agency.

                    You can have a great LE career as long as some agency will give you a can. Good Luck and if you have any other questions don't hesistate to ask.
                    Your my new hero. I'm Type 1 as well. That is the same thing I do as you have listed above. Very inspirational, thank you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you all for the information. I am a type 2 diabetic. I only have to check my blood suger 3 days a week and take my pills twice a day. I am not at the point to where i have to take insulin shots--hopefully I never get to that point. I am applying at my local police department in a few months. The last thing I would want is to be DQ for something like this. Once again, thank you all so much and thank you for your service.
                      The pain you endured yesterday and today makes for a great tomorrow.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you all for the information. I am a type 2 diabetic. I only have to check my blood suger 3 days a week and take my pills twice a day. I am not at the point to where i have to take insulin shots--hopefully I never get to that point. I am applying at my local police department in a few months. The last thing I would want is to be DQ for something like this. Once again, thank you all so much and thank you for your service.
                        The pain you endured yesterday and today makes for a great tomorrow.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank you all for the information. I am a type 2 diabetic. I only have to check my blood suger 3 days a week and take my pills twice a day. I am not at the point to where i have to take insulin shots--hopefully I never get to that point. I am applying at my local police department in a few months. The last thing I would want is to be DQ for something like this. Once again, thank you all so much and thank you for your service.
                          The pain you endured yesterday and today makes for a great tomorrow.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Usually if you can control your diabetes with pills, diet and working out most departments won't DQ you. Good luck getting hired and keep us informed.
                            Strong Body, Sharp Mind And Good Tactics!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mikeymedic View Post
                              Your my new hero. I'm Type 1 as well. That is the same thing I do as you have listed above. Very inspirational, thank you.
                              No problem, brother! Its cool to meet someone who is diabetic in the LE field and who understands the day to day work that goes into staying on top of it.
                              Strong Body, Sharp Mind And Good Tactics!

                              Comment

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