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  • Where do I stand?

    Good morning everyone. I am new to this forum and just wanted to lay some questions and information out on the table. Here I go… I am a 26 year old male in the Marine Corps. My job is Military Police/K-9 Explosive Detection Handler. I have two years left come this December 27. I want more than anything to pursue a career in the law enforcement field (with also trying for K-9 when the time is comes). With that said, I have no shame in laying out what I have done in the past and what I plan on doing in the future. All I am looking for are real, straight forward, no “bs” answers.
    I have below average credit due to a bankruptcy I filed. The company that I started could not meet the “buy out” price of the current contract. Lesson learned. I have been in trouble with the law before, at a young age, up to the age of seventeen. I have never been to jail or prison. At the time I was on probation. The only place that I have ever been to was a juvenile hall. Upon leaving there, I also completed a mandatory impatient drug program. I have been on the right side of the law and drug free for going on nine years. That is what I have done on the bad side of the spectrum.
    On the good side of the spectrum, I have excelled in many areas of my life, the Marine Corps being the largest of them all. I am in great physical condition and an expert at both the rifle and pistol. I have jumped through the ranks and was hand selected to join the specialized field of K-9. I have never let anything get in my way since. I am currently on my second deployment to Iraq and I have had much success with my K-9 on both deployments thus far. The only reason that I will not make the Marine Corps a career is due to the fact that I want to start a family with my wife and settle down. I will be the age of twenty eight when I am discharged from the military.
    On the education side of things, I have my high school diploma and I do want to get a BS in Criminology. I would have started classes already, but with my deployments getting closer and closer to one another, it makes it difficult at the moment. I qualify for the new Chapter 33 G.I. Bill and foresee no problems furthering my education upon my discharge from the Marine Corps. I am also pretty fluent in Spanish.
    I know it is a lot of stuff, but I need to know where I stand and what my options are. Any and all information is more than welcome. Thank you to whoever takes the time to read this.

    Respectfully Submitted,
    -Webb
    Cpl/USMC

  • #2
    Well it depends on W H Y you were having negative law enforcement contacts up to age 17. You want a no BS awnser but you are being evasive and deceptive.

    What were you charged with, and what is your drug use history (What, how much did you do, how long ago,) Those are the two things that jam most people up.
    The greatest misconception in police work that gets more officers killed is alot of cops are still taught to use the "minimum force necessary". In reality a true professional will always resort to the "Maximum Allowable Force" to resolve a situation. They mean the same thing, however one is a restriction and the other is an empowerment.

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    • #3
      I would go for the security of a Marine Corp retirement get out at 20 then start another 20yr carreer in LE at that time, and double dip the retirement plan when old. Plenty of military families out there that work out fine.

      Your moving through the ranks was automatic till you went for E4.

      With all the insecurity in the private sector I would not throw away an investment of what you have done by quitting early.

      Guys on hear talk of trying to become LE for 5 yrs once you leave the Marines you need to get into something quickly to survive if the LE thing will not work out due to your past. If you finished 20yrs with the Marines your past would be far behind, not recent memory. Spend the next 2 yrs while in doing some type of online eduation program field. Education also adds to your advancement points for making E5.
      Last edited by David Hineline; 11-14-2008, 06:58 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by TazedYaBro View Post
        Well it depends on W H Y you were having negative law enforcement contacts up to age 17. You want a no BS awnser but you are being evasive and deceptive.

        What were you charged with, and what is your drug use history (What, how much did you do, how long ago,) Those are the two things that jam most people up.
        What he said. Those were my thoughts while reading your post.

        You don't have to be specific with us, of course, but you will have to divulge all the gritty details during your background investigation.

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        • #5
          I have to go with the rest. As a an experienced MP you should that past criminal history and drug usage are key elements in passing or failing a law enforcement background. Yet, while you say you have no shame in laying out what you have done, you gloss over those issues with a quick, "I have been in trouble with the law before, at a young age, up to the age of seventeen. I have never been to jail or prison. At the time I was on probation. The only place that I have ever been to was a juvenile hall. Upon leaving there, I also completed a mandatory impatient drug program."

          Without knowing what crimes you committed or what drugs you took, no one can give you a good answer. However, reading between the lines, you usually don't serve time in juvenile hall for Mickey Mouse stuff and you usually don't wind up in a mandatory inpatient drug program for soft drugs that would be overlooked on a background. If any of the crimes you were convicted of were a felony, it would be an auto DQ in my state. Similarly, if you were into heroin, LSD, etc, you chances are pretty much down the tubes.

          The easiest way to find out for sure is to approach a background investigator with the department you want to go to, tell him about your prior convictions and drug use and ask if they are an auto DQ. The criteria for DQ is not a state secret and he should be happy to let you know how your history may effect things.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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          • #6
            http://forums.officer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=94150

            Props guams.
            ‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’
            Oscar Wilde

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