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  • Chicago cops say they are rebelling against chief

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/n...eslowdown.html

    September 18, 2008

    CHICAGO – Serious crime is up but arrests are down in Chicago, and some police officers say they are working the streets less aggressively out of resentment toward their new chief and fear of being second-guessed by him.
    “People are doing just what they need to get through” their shifts, said Lt. Robert Weisskopf, president of the Chicago police lieutenants union, “and not any extra.”

    In addition to making fewer arrests, police are seizing fewer guns and frisking gang members less often than they did before Superintendent Jody Weis was brought in to clean up a department embarrassed by a string of brutality cases, according to interviews, statistics provided by police and an internal document obtained by The Associated Press.

    Department spokeswoman Monique Bond disputed the notion of any deliberate slowdown by police, saying, “There is nothing that we have to prove or support a theory like that.”

    She suggested instead that the drop in arrests means officers are focusing on serious crimes instead of such offenses as disorderly conduct and public drinking.

    But some members of the police department, both publicly and privately, blame low morale and fear of investigation by Weis, a former FBI agent who took over in February.

    “If I see a crime happening, I take action,” said an officer who has more than 25 years on the force and spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation. “But I don't go out of my way to stop someone on a hunch or if they look suspicious. I don't want to be accused of racial profiling and run afoul of this guy who we know won't back us up.”

    Through the end of August, the department made 103,589 arrests (not including arrests for outstanding arrest warrants) compared with 117,971 for the same period last year, according to the department. The 5,600 guns recovered is roughly half as many as police seized in the same period in 2007, internal documents show.

    Bookings in the Cook County Jail – where the vast majority of inmates come from Chicago – are down, too. In all but one month this year, the number of people booked into the jail was down from the same month a year earlier, sometimes by hundreds, according to data obtained by the AP through a Freedom of Information Act request.

    Chicago has had 322 murders through Aug. 21, or 42 more than the number committed through the same date last year. Also, police have received 10,000 more calls from people about shots being fired, and the number of calls about gang disturbances has jumped by nearly 4,000, according to the department documents.

    “It is de-policing,” said city Alderman Isaac Carothers, who heads the committee that oversees the department. “They do their jobs, but they don't do their jobs as aggressively.”

    Nobody is suggesting that the more than 13,000 officers in the nation's second-largest police department aren't racing to crime scenes or faithfully pursuing investigations.

    But among the slew of statistics kept by the department are “self-initiated” calls, or those in which officers stop and question people about possible drug or gang activity. Department figures show the total is down by more than 3,700 from the same period last year.

    At a City Council hearing in July, Weis called the rising crime figures and falling arrest numbers “very troubling.”

    Weis has said officers have told him they are afraid of being sued or becoming the subject of complaints by criminals. Weis has told their commanders to drive home the message that he wants them to be aggressive and that “the department will have their back,” Bond said.

    Brought in with a mandate from Mayor Richard Daley to repair the reputation of a department, Weis shook things up almost immediately.

    The first outsider to run the department in decades, Weis replaced 21 of 25 district commanders. He created a new Bureau of Professional Standards, which oversees the Internal Affairs Division, the unit that investigates officers.

    He also started talking about getting police officers in better shape and ordered those on desk duty to hit the streets.

    In addition, he asked federal officials to investigate an officer who had already pleaded guilty to beating a handcuffed man shackled to a wheelchair and was serving a two-year suspension. That angered the rank-and-file.

    They felt the officer “did something wrong and he paid his debt to society,” Weisskopf said. “But it was as if that wasn't good enough, 'We didn't get our complete pound of flesh.'”

    Since then, “guys feel the superintendent and the administration does not have their back,” said John Pallohusky, president of the police sergeants union.

    The mistrust grew after the department announced recently that every police car would be equipped with electronic tracking devices and officers would be asked to submit DNA samples at crime scenes.

    “If you don't feel your bosses support you, are you going to stick your neck out?” Weisskopf asked.




  • #2
    Just asking?

    Sound Familiar?

    Comment


    • #3
      What Chicago needs is a good community organizer to make things right there......oh, wait......my bad!
      "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

      Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

      Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

      Comment


      • #4
        Jody Weis is also my boss - his office is within my building (OEMC).
        I must admit, the morale of CPD according to a couple of officers I work with isn't that great. No one really likes the guy, and he seems to be a "media pawn" at best.

        I love my mayor, but what was he thinking bringing a guy in from the FBI to shape up the department. There were plenty of qualified officers that Daley overlooked. Commander Helm, Commander Keenan, Deputy Starks, just to name a few.

        Weis' salary = $150,000 for Superintendant position with CPD + $150,000 for lead position with Chicago's OEMC. $300,000 !!!!! That's more than the mayor's salary!

        Wow it must be nice to be Weis! HEY THAT RHYMES!
        Last edited by StephDakel; 09-18-2008, 06:20 PM. Reason: Hillary Clinton's approval
        Gov Blagojevich - "I'am the American dream...."

        Comment


        • #5
          Why not put a "reverend" in charge?

          Comment


          • #6
            A two year suspension? That's got to be the longest suspension I've ever heard of.
            "We're not in this business for the money. We're not in it for the excitement, and moments like this. Duty, honor, country, service, truth, and justice are good. But you can do that from behind a desk. In the end, you carry a gun and shield out into the field for the sole purpose of confronting the bad guys. The enemy. There is no other reason to be on the front lines." ~Nelson Demille

            If your story involves Peanut Butter and an animal - give up now!
            sigpic

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            • #7
              In addition, he asked federal officials to investigate an officer who had already pleaded guilty to beating a handcuffed man shackled to a wheelchair and was serving a two-year suspension. That angered the rank-and-file.
              I suppose such incidents are routine for Chicago PD.
              Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
              Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by xraodcop View Post
                http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/n...eslowdown.html

                September 18, 2008

                CHICAGO – Serious crime is up but arrests are down in Chicago,

                In addition to making fewer arrests, police are seizing fewer guns and frisking gang members less often,

                Through the end of August, the department made 103,589 arrests (not including arrests for outstanding arrest warrants) compared with 117,971 for the same period last year, according to the department. The 5,600 guns recovered is roughly half as many as police seized in the same period in 2007, internal documents show.

                Bookings in the Cook County Jail – where the vast majority of inmates come from Chicago – are down, too. In all but one month this year, the number of people booked into the jail was down from the same month a year earlier, sometimes by hundreds, according to data obtained by the AP through a Freedom of Information Act request.

                Chicago has had 322 murders through Aug. 21, or 42 more than the number committed through the same date last year. Also, police have received 10,000 more calls from people about shots being fired, and the number of calls about gang disturbances has jumped by nearly 4,000, according to the department documents.



                Nobody is suggesting that the more than 13,000 officers in the nation's second-largest police department aren't racing to crime scenes or faithfully pursuing investigations.




                Another possible reason that crime is up and arrests are down is that CPD is pretty severely understaffed. Although the article states there are 13,000 officers, which is what it is supposed to be, I've heard some estimations that the department is several thousand officers short, with most of those vacancies on the street. Add that to the fact that they've just starting hiring some of the applicants who tested in 2006, and haven't even offered a test since then, the whole thing is a mess. Despite the quotes from Chicago Police officers, I'm pretty skeptical about how much, if at all, the drop in arrests can be attributed to Weis. That aside, he is still an idiot, and although I desperately want to work for CPD, I definitely hope he is gone by the time I get on.
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkcX_5hZN6U



                http://www.killology.com/sheep_dog.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by StephDakel View Post
                  Jody Weis is also my boss - his office is within my building (OEMC).
                  I must admit, the morale of CPD according to a couple of officers I work with isn't that great. No one really likes the guy, and he seems to be a "media pawn" at best.

                  I love my mayor, but what was he thinking bringing a guy in from the FBI to shape up the department. There were plenty of qualified officers that Daley overlooked. Commander Helm, Commander Keenan, Deputy Starks, just to name a few.

                  Weis' salary = $150,000 for Superintendant position with CPD + $150,000 for lead position with Chicago's OEMC. $300,000 !!!!! That's more than the mayor's salary!

                  Wow it must be nice to be Weis! HEY THAT RHYMES!

                  Your mayor is is an idiot socialist with no redeeming qualities whatsoever.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StephDakel View Post
                    No one really likes the guy, and he seems to be a "media pawn" at best.
                    That seems to be the case with some Chiefs nowadays. More a politician than an officer.
                    The Red, Bold, Italic is my official sarcasm tag.



                    "I think many years ago an advanced civilization intervened with us genetically and gave us just enough intelligence to develop dangerous technology but not enough to use it wisely. Then they sat back to watch the fun. Kind of like a human zoo. And you know what? They're getting their money's worth"
                    George Carlin

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 11b101abn View Post
                      Your mayor is is an idiot socialist with no redeeming qualities whatsoever.
                      So absolutely true. Thank God I live in the suburbs.
                      son, if you keep this up, soon you'll inherit the family mullet!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Blackavar
                        Taking my DNA at a crime scene?!? I don't think so.
                        Agreed. That seems like an absurd waste of resources and I don't think it should ever be necessary unless there is a specific reason to believe the scene might've been contaminated/altered.

                        If the guy knew what was good for Chicago he would resign. Based on what I'm reading here, I don't think there is much he can do to fix his reputation.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ChiCity View Post
                          Another possible reason that crime is up and arrests are down is that CPD is pretty severely understaffed. Although the article states there are 13,000 officers, which is what it is supposed to be, I've heard some estimations that the department is several thousand officers short, with most of those vacancies on the street. Add that to the fact that they've just starting hiring some of the applicants who tested in 2006, and haven't even offered a test since then, the whole thing is a mess. Despite the quotes from Chicago Police officers, I'm pretty skeptical about how much, if at all, the drop in arrests can be attributed to Weis. That aside, he is still an idiot, and although I desperately want to work for CPD, I definitely hope he is gone by the time I get on.
                          I agree with all of this.

                          Regarding the number of POs: they say the target number is about 13,000, and they admit that the actual number is somewhere around 2,000 less than that, but on a payroll run, the operator verified (to someone) that there were fewer than 10,000 checks.

                          I wonder where the rest of the budgeted money is going.

                          Regards,

                          Monty
                          Last edited by Monty Ealerman; 09-19-2008, 03:17 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
                            I wonder where the rest of the budgeted money is going.
                            This is Chicago. I am surprised there were not 2000 dead people on the police payroll.
                            Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. -- Aldous Huxley
                            Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity. -- Albert Einstein

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It looks to me on superficial investigation that maybe as much as a hundred million, or perhaps even more, per year may be being diverted from the police salary budget.

                              Comment

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