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  • Motorcycle riding questions (for motorcycle cops)

    Not really sure this is the right place to put this, but i dont want non leo's input.

    Ive seen a lot of yalls training videos. ive been riding for close to 60k miles, ive done the BRC and signing up for an ARC. im all about being a better rider and any skill set i can get that will keep me alive i want to have.

    Is it possible for a non leo to take the training course they give yall?

    If they do, do they require a specific type of bike? I ride a super sport. Also is there one in Florida?



    Thank you
    Last edited by Dingbat; 01-14-2020, 03:04 AM.
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

  • #2
    My police department's qualification and the yearly re-certification course was for officers only. I'm pretty sure an agency would shy away from sponsoring any activity that a non-employee could possibly get injured or do damage to personal equipment.....seeing the attitude in today's world of lawsuits.

    You might contact some motorcycle dealers and inquire if they have or know of any training courses. A junior college in our city had a training course a few times, so that might be an option to explore also.
    If your biggest work-related fear is getting a paper cut, don't try and tell a cop how to do his job.

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    • #4
      Nope. No training program would allow non affiliated persons to attend.
      Now go home and get your shine box!

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      • #5
        https://www.sheriffacademy.com/class.php?id=103

        Closest thing I have seen to what you are asking about. They also do a day two which has to be taken within 12 months of day one. I am taking the class this spring. California though, not Florida.

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        • #6
          Originally posted by Dingbat View Post
          Not really sure this is the right place to put this, but i dont want non leo's input.

          Ive seen a lot of yalls training videos. ive been riding for close to 60k miles, ive done the BRC and signing up for an ARC. im all about being a better rider and any skill set i can get that will keep me alive i want to have.

          Is it possible for a non leo to take the training course they give yall?

          If they do, do they require a specific type of bike? I ride a super sport. Also is there one in Florida?



          Thank you
          Nothing to add regarding a class, but Kudos to you for trying to improve your skills.

          Comment


          • #7
            Not a motorcycle cop, just a cop who loves riding motorcycles.

            Search for the MSF's Ultimate Bike Bonding RiderCourse in your area. I haven't taken it (just completed BRC2 and hope to do ARC this year. But one of my rider coaches described UBBRC as "the closest thing a civilian can get to motor officer training".

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            • #8
              In addition to my law enforcement background, I have also served as an expert-licensed motorcycle road racer and a motorcycle road racing instructor.

              Low-speed parking lot parlor tricks have nothing to do with keeping you alive or making you a better motorcycle rider. There are no motorcyclists dying in parking lots for lack of the ability to turn their motorcycle around inside a parking space at a walking pace.

              The MSF BRC is an excellent place to start. It teaches some important basics- counter-steering, and their SIPDE threat management system. Modern motorcycles have long left the MSF BRC braking teachings behind, but I prefer that students do the BRC first, and then learn proper braking after. It is usually as simple as just getting the students to stop using the rear brake while in motion.

              After the BRC, I recommend reading Keith Code's "Twist Of The Wrist II", from cover to cover, until you understand it. This will allow you to learn how/why motorcycles do the things they do, and how the rider can influence the motorcycle to achieve the desired outcome.

              And after you understand the principles taught in TOTW II, I recommend a track day, to convert that academic knowledge into a repeatable skill set- muscle memory. There is no place you can safely practice collision-avoidance type braking and turning, apart from a track day.

              What year/model supersport do you ride, and what do you use it for? Supersports are great for sanctioned supersport competition, but if you're just using it for general transportation on public roads, there are better motorcycles available.
              Last edited by Aidokea; 01-15-2020, 03:59 AM.

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              • #9
                When most people say "supersport", what they mean specifically, is four-cylinder 600-class supersports.

                They have good frame, ergonomics, geometry, suspension, brakes, and tires- they will brake and turn just fine for general transportation use on public roads.

                The problem is acceleration. Modern 600-class supersports are generally geared for a top speed of about 170 mph in top (6th) gear. Because they are designed for sanctioned road racing, they use a close-ratio gear box that spaces the gears very tightly below that 170 mph top speed. This generally leaves first gear geared for about 85 mph.

                Further, the peak torque of four cylinder 600-class supersports is generally produced at about 11,000 rpm, and peak power is generally produced thousands of rpms higher than that.

                But when people try to use them for general transportation use on public roads, they tend to piddle around at legal(ish) road speeds in the upper gears, at about 6,000-7,000 rpms, where the engine is capable of producing all the horsepower and torque of a wet fart. If a car changes lanes into you and you whack the throttle wide open to try to get out of the way in those conditions, it does almost nothing. Even if you had the time to downshift five times into first gear and then pin it, you are still being separated from any meaningful torque/horsepower by that 85 mph first gear.

                If you simply MUST use a supersport for general transportation use on public roads (for whatever reasons), more displacement and fewer cylinders will generally help. A 675 triple or a 750 four would be a little safer. An 800 triple or a 1000 four would be a little safer than that.

                But the real solution, would be to choose a sport standard type motorcycle with a wide-ratio transmission, a nice accessible first gear, and more low rpm torque and horsepower. The KTM 1290 Super Duke R, the Ducati Monster 1200, and the Triumph Speed Triple 1050, would all be great choices. They brake and turn well, but they also go, right now, when you need to accelerate.

                Heck, even an SV650 would be a better choice than a 4-cylinder 600.
                Last edited by Aidokea; 01-15-2020, 02:31 PM.

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                • #10
                  Not sure that anyone’s actually looked, but these links are exactly what you want, short of the actual firearms portion of the motorcycle classes.

                  Two of the schools are run by former motorcycle officers, father and son, they actually have loaner bikes so you’re not dumping your own bike,.....which you Will do, repeatedly!

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by NolaT View Post

                    Not sure that anyone’s actually looked, but these links are exactly what you want, short of the actual firearms portion of the motorcycle classes.

                    Two of the schools are run by former motorcycle officers, father and son, they actually have loaner bikes so you’re not dumping your own bike,.....which you Will do, repeatedly!
                    Same for the ACSO classes. They use retired KZ1000 police motorcycles. Class used to be $150. Went up to $200 this year. Rental of their Moto is only $50 which considering how much they will be knocked around, I think is a good deal. The instructors are POST certified and teach the regular POST 80 hour LEO Motors course.

                    Comment

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