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  • Traffic Light Camera's

    Here in NJ, they just started to install the camera's on top of the traffic lights. From what I hear so far NJ has not passed the OK for any of the twps to use them. I admit that I am one of them who will occasionally go thru a yellow, but sometimes you just can't avoid doing so. How exactly do these camera's work? I don't know about other states but I know here NJ should be the Tailgate state. While approaching a light and if it turns yellow do you just slam on your brakes in hope that the guy behind you is paying attention and you don't get into an accident? Or while approaching a light it turns yellow you just can't stop? I have never got any sort of ticket...(knock on wood) but I think driving an Suv as apposed a sports car is what's saving my hide. Well ty for reading my complaint..lol or what ever it is, but I just don't know how to exactly understand how it all works.
    so we embrace again behind the dunes, this beach is so cold on winter afternoons, but holding you close is like holding the summer sun

  • #2
    You are in violation of traffic code, if you cannot get stopped for a yellow light. In my state you could be cited for speeding, disregarding an automatic signal, failure to yield, or speed too fast for conditions. The bottom line is you must maintain control of your vehicle, not matter the traffic or weather conditions.

    Comment


    • #3
      You are in violation of traffic code, if you cannot get stopped for a yellow light.
      Serioulsy? How is that possible? My car, or any car cannot stop in one foot of distance. If the light turns yellow while I am 12 inches from the entrance to the intersection I couldn't possibly stop in time. I can try, but I think that would be foolish. Plus if I did this at every yellow light, my brakes would be shot in no time. Not to mention my tires. I would have to replace both every week or so.

      Perhaps the best solution is to slow to a speed that would allow you to stop in time. 2-5mph. Would this be okay to do before every intersection?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Potatohead
        Serioulsy? How is that possible? My car, or any car cannot stop in one foot of distance. If the light turns yellow while I am 12 inches from the entrance to the intersection I couldn't possibly stop in time. I can try, but I think that would be foolish. Plus if I did this at every yellow light, my brakes would be shot in no time. Not to mention my tires. I would have to replace both every week or so.

        Perhaps the best solution is to slow to a speed that would allow you to stop in time. 2-5mph. Would this be okay to do before every intersection?
        If you are travelling the SPEED LIMIT and the lights turns yellow the moment you enter the intersection, no problem. If enter the intersection as the light turns red, that is a violation. Accelerating to beat a yellow light is a violation. The guy that theoretically rear ended you is in violation too. I recently worked a wreck involving the circumstances you mentioned. Both drivers were cited.

        Yes. If you think the light is about to change, the prudent course of action would be to slow down. Driving with due regard is a novel idea but it works.

        Comment


        • #5
          After driving since dinosaurs were roaming the earth...I would also suggest that if one is traveling the road with a traffic signal ahead of them...they should consider that if the light has been green for awhile...it's due to change. One should THINK it'll change and reduce speed in case is DOES change!

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          • #6
            Ok so then what you are saying is just slow it down at every light? I know that now they (NJ) which is incredible has gotten smarter with the lights that tell you when to walk thru and intersection well they are timmed now, you can see the numbers they count down from 20-1. When it hits 0 then the light turns red. When the day comes that they all get that it would be alot easier but till then I can see that I will be getting NJ out of debt...lol
            so we embrace again behind the dunes, this beach is so cold on winter afternoons, but holding you close is like holding the summer sun

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by irisheyes31f
              Ok so then what you are saying is just slow it down at every light? I know that now they (NJ) which is incredible has gotten smarter with the lights that tell you when to walk thru and intersection well they are timmed now, you can see the numbers they count down from 20-1. When it hits 0 then the light turns red. When the day comes that they all get that it would be alot easier but till then I can see that I will be getting NJ out of debt...lol
              At intersections with a pedestrian crossing signal, the “Do Not Walk” light will flash when the traffic light is about to change to yellow. That might help determine how soon the light will change.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yellow Lights


                A big "should I stay or should I go" moment can occur at many controlled intersections.....no doubt about that. What makes matters worse, though, is how lights can be timed. A typical yellow light should be 4 seconds or longer if the speed traveled is 45 mph or above. Three seconds will suffice when the 'average' speed of cars is less than 45 mph. Things will be different, though, for trucks and buses - which require more time and space to stop than a passenger car.

                Here in Northern VA, we used to have those pesky red light cameras in some localities - but the law allowing their use ended grandfathering out about two summers ago (THANKFULLY!). Ironically, the yellow lights always seemed a bit short in places where the cameras were used. A coincidence? I think not! A lot of localities got addicted to the money that these little suckers generate; not to mention the owner of the camera (a private company) getting its share of the loot.


                If you can safely proceed through the intersection as the light changes yellow, you are okay. However, if the light turns red before the front end of your car passes the wide white line at the beginning of the intersection (usually almost directly under the light or just ahead of it), then you could be given a summons for disregarding a traffic signal.

                T-bone collisions are never fun, but many more of them will be eliminated by adjusting the timing of the lights - rather than just putting in more cameras. You don't want everyone so paranoid of a red-light ticket that people slam on the brakes way too early and we end up with rear-end collisions. Likewise, a one- or two-second delay before the side street gets a green light will do wonders to reduce those dangerous collisions.


                Go do a Google search, and you can read many articles and opinion pieces about this issue -- from both sides.
                Last edited by VA Dutch; 01-04-2007, 06:35 PM.

                The comments above reflect my personal opinion as a private citizen, ordinary motorist and all-around good guy.

                The aforementioned advice should not be construed to represent any type of professional opinion, legal counsel or other type of instruction with regard to traffic laws, judicial proceedings or official agency policy.

                ------------------------------------------------

                "Ignorance on fire is hotter than knowledge on ice."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by VA Dutch

                  A big "should I stay or should I go" moment can occur at many controlled intersections.....no doubt about that. What makes matters worse, though, is how lights can be timed. A typical yellow light should be 4 seconds or longer if the speed traveled is 45 mph or above. Three seconds will suffice when the 'average' speed of cars is less than 45 mph. Things will be different, though, for trucks and buses - which require more time and space to stop than a passenger car.

                  Here in Northern VA, we used to have those pesky red light cameras in some localities - but the law allowing their use ended grandfathering out about two summers ago (THANKFULLY!). Ironically, the yellow lights always seemed a bit short in places where the cameras were used. A coincidence? I think not! A lot of localities got addicted to the money that these little suckers generate; not to mention the owner of the camera (a private company) getting its share of the loot.


                  If you can safely proceed through the intersection as the light changes yellow, you are okay. However, if the light turns red before the front end of your car passes the wide white line at the beginning of the intersection (usually almost directly under the light or just ahead of it), then you could be given a summons for disregarding a traffic signal.

                  T-bone collisions are never fun, but many more of them will be eliminated by adjusting the timing of the lights - rather than just putting in more cameras. You don't want everyone so paranoid of a red-light ticket that people slam on the brakes way too early and we end up with rear-end collisions. Likewise, a one- or two-second delay before the side street gets a green light will do wonders to reduce those dangerous collisions.


                  Go do a Google search, and you can read many articles and opinion pieces about this issue -- from both sides.



                  Germantown, Tennessee, take note, especially about the part where your yellow lights seem to be short at your camera-controlled intersections. I guess you, the City and the company that owns the cameras both have an interest in the amount of revenue generated.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    VA Dutch, correct me if I'm wrong, but when I was stationed in VA the trooper told us that the solid yellow coming up on an intersection corresponds with the timing of the yellow and if you are going the speed limit and are in the solid yellow portion you will make the light and don't need to stop but if you are still in the dashed portion then you need to stop.
                    "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

                    For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      It is supposed to be that way, but we all know that differrent intersections have different light/signal timing. I have seen roads with 35-mph traffic flow that have a very "long" yellow signal, and even a reasonable delay - where both sides are red for a second or two - before the other folks get their green light.

                      Conversely, I have seen 55-mph zones with rather "short" yellow lights. It is not physically possible to stop within the time & space permitted, unless you are driving a high-performance car equipped with 4-wheel disc brakes and your reflexes rival those of a fighter pilot!

                      Drive on VA Route 28 out near Dulles Airport (Chantilly area)........which is just one I can remember on the spur of the moment. There are probably many more in other parts of the state. Of course, I know that some of the ones where they used to have cameras had very poor light timing. Coincidence? I think not.

                      Of course, it could be different where you live; but I have seen properly-timed signal lights and ones that are really messed up.

                      The District of Columbia not only uses the red-light cameras, but they are making a killing (millions of dollars) with unmanned radar cameras to nab speeders. When the limit is set artificially low, it is pretty much "easy pickin's" most any time of the day. Since DC never got their wish to implement a commuter tax on Virginia residents, it seems they've found another way to get our money.

                      The comments above reflect my personal opinion as a private citizen, ordinary motorist and all-around good guy.

                      The aforementioned advice should not be construed to represent any type of professional opinion, legal counsel or other type of instruction with regard to traffic laws, judicial proceedings or official agency policy.

                      ------------------------------------------------

                      "Ignorance on fire is hotter than knowledge on ice."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't live in VA anymore but I always liked those solid portions as it gave me something to judge the light by and if timed correctly I'm sure it gave the officers good PC for stops. I haven't seen anywhere else that does this though but would like to see it spread to the rest of the country.

                        Originally posted by VA Dutch
                        Of course, it could be different where you live; but I have seen properly-timed signal lights and ones that are really messed up.
                        "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

                        For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Only my second day in this forum, and I think this forum was an excellent idea... theres lot to learn to become a good driver.... and this is a very good topic

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            In California you may not cross the limit line after the light has turned red. The yellow is there to let you know it is going to turn red. If the front of your car is past the limit line when the light turns red you are OK...if the front of your car is behind the limit line when the light turns red you are in violation. The red light cameras here are built in with a very slight delay from when the light turns red. After the delay any vehicle crossing is photographed from multiple directions showing the red light and the front of the vehicle not yet crossing the limit line.

                            Its a judgement call when the light changes from green to yellow.....if its safe to stop you should stop...if you cant safely stop without locking up your brakes then proceed at a safe speed through the intersection on the yellow light.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You could learn to drive. Most people that are smart can anticipate when a light is going to change from a block away.(If you are doing the speed limit). Here, you can get a failure to stop ticket for $220 for going through a yellow light. (The same as a yellow light)

                              Comment

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