Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Approaching a suspect (during a traffic stop)

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Approaching a suspect (during a traffic stop)

    When an officer approaches a suspect that he or she has just pulled over is it standard procedure to place a hand on one's gun? I heard that in some places it has recently become a requirement due to the impredictability of most people. Thanks for your help.

  • #2
    Not a requirement, but something many officers do. While in Officer Survival they showed how little difference keeping your hand on your weapon really makes- even having it out of the holster and down by your side doesn't make that much difference, so I stopped doing that a while ago.
    You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Centurion44
      Not a requirement, but something many officers do. While in Officer Survival they showed how little difference keeping your hand on your weapon really makes- even having it out of the holster and down by your side doesn't make that much difference, so I stopped doing that a while ago.
      How is it not helpful if the situation escalates into reason to use the weapon?

      Comment


      • #4
        I usually get them out of the car and on to the sidewalk.
        If I do approach then my hand is on the gun.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Conner
          How is it not helpful if the situation escalates into reason to use the weapon?

          Conner, different schools of thought on that one. I believe what 44's statement refers to is that, even with your hand on the weapon your thought process still goes through the it's phases, all that takes about the same amount of time. If you shave off anything it may only be a hundredth of a second .... I know every second counts.

          Personally, It depends on what I see as I approach. I can't say that I never or always have my hand on the weapon, hell there are time I have it in hand. Lots depends on time of day, how many people in car, movement, visability.... lots.

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with the idea that having your hand on your handgun is a good idea when a contact seems hanky. If anything, it gives me the opportunity to get proper grip placement so if I do need to draw in a hurry, I'm in better position to engage the threat. I've never heard of any agency making the tactic a requirement though.

            This topic reminds me of a stop I made once where I pressed on the trunk lid of the car (like I always do). The lady driving was furious that I touched her vehicle until I explained how some officers have been attacked by folks hiding in the trunk or how slain officers' prints were located on the vehicle after the fact. She sure changed her tune in a hurry.
            God made cops so firemen would have heroes.

            You do not greet Death; you punch him in the throat repeatedly as he drags you away.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Conner
              How is it not helpful if the situation escalates into reason to use the weapon?
              Because we practice (or should practice) drawing our weapon so much that it should be second nature. And placing your hand on your weapon when they should be in a more "ready" position to defend against strikes is more encouraged. There was almost no time difference for me from having my hand on a weapon and getting a round off than having my hands in a ready position in front of me and getting a round off. This excercise we did was more to encourage weapon retention. If it makes an officer feel better to have his hand on his weaponi, I don't have any issues with that- I still catch myself doing it on occasion subconsciousely.


              Originally posted by Da Po-po
              I agree with the idea that having your hand on your handgun is a good idea when a contact seems hanky. If anything, it gives me the opportunity to get proper grip placement so if I do need to draw in a hurry, I'm in better position to engage the threat. I've never heard of any agency making the tactic a requirement though.
              If you practice like you should, grip placement should be just as automatic as drawing your weapon. It should all be one motion.
              You have no right to not be offended.-Neal Boortz

              Comment


              • #8
                [QUOTE=Centurion44]Because we practice (or should practice) drawing our weapon so much that it should be second nature. And placing your hand on your weapon when they should be in a more "ready" position to defend against strikes is more encouraged. There was almost no time difference for me from having my hand on a weapon and getting a round off than having my hands in a ready position in front of me and getting a round off. This excercise we did was more to encourage weapon retention. If it makes an officer feel better to have his hand on his weaponi, I don't have any issues with that- I still catch myself doing it on occasion subconsciousely.

                i agree, we used to pratice holding our clip boards, then the instructor would edge the targets, it was time to ditch the clip board and put "anti felon repelant" down range

                Comment

                MR300x250 Tablet

                Collapse

                What's Going On

                Collapse

                There are currently 6301 users online. 372 members and 5929 guests.

                Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                Welcome Ad

                Collapse
                Working...
                X