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  • IAM Rand
    replied
    Ha, thats funny. I have had an attorney try to get the ticket dismissed because the violation was in town and by the time I caught up to him and activated my lights it was in the county. They will try anything. I do prefer to stay out of the middle of the cars. Depending on traffic and time of day I will either contact driver's side or go around the back on my car to the passenger side.

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  • HI629
    replied
    Originally posted by 2wheeldep View Post
    ^^^^^^ +1

    I had an attorney in court argue for his client the fact that I did not use my red lights and siren to stop his client the citation should be dismissed. The attorney argued that I did not follow proper department policy. I rolled up next to violators vehicle at a red light and tapped on his window and told him to pull into a parking lot.
    How did the judge rule?

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  • 2wheeldep
    replied
    ^^^^^^ +1

    I had an attorney in court argue for his client the fact that I did not use my red lights and siren to stop his client the citation should be dismissed. The attorney argued that I did not follow proper department policy. I rolled up next to violators vehicle at a red light and tapped on his window and told him to pull into a parking lot.

    Leave a comment:


  • FL Trooper
    replied
    Statistically you are much more likely to be killed by passing traffic than by the offender in the vehicle you stopped. That is why we approach on the passenger side. There are also several advantages to the passenger side approach that provide the officer with surprise and a much better view of the vehicle while speaking with the driver. As for walking between the vehicles, I do it because there is no rule saying I can't. I'm going that way anyway, why not take the shortest route and just cut between the vehicles? Of course, at night time I walk the long way around my vehicle and approach from the passenger side.

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  • Crimy
    replied
    Depends on my mood, traffic conditions, meteorological conditions, and what my horoscope has said for the day. That can equal a driver or passenger side approach. During daytime if im doing passenger side approach i walk between the vehicles, at night its around the back of my car.

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  • Prov1x
    replied
    I prefer passenger side approach but tend to go to the driver's side due to the fact that it's easier to smell alcohol and what not. Passenger side approach is good since 90 whatever percent of people are right handed. I generally go in between the cars on dayshift and around the rear of mine on nights.

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  • PhilipCal
    replied
    My Agency uses the rider side approach. The Trooper will walk between his car and the violator vehicle. As a supervisor, I'd have a problem with a Trooper who conducted the entire enforcement contact with both him and the violator between the vehicles. The perfectly safe method does not exist.

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  • LA DEP
    replied
    You nailed it on the head with 'every department is different'......we are different enough that passenger side approaches (by the driver deputy) are not even taught here.

    But, we also are not generally doing t-stops on the freeway either.

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  • benseventeen
    replied
    Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
    If a supervisor sees you walk in between your radio car and the car you have stopped out here FOR ANY REASON, I can almost guarantee that you will get written up for it.
    Gotchya. I was wondering how rigid of a rule that is... seems pretty rigid, lol. I thought it might be more of a general rule with some exceptions... like maybe there would be certain situations an officer might want to approach from the passenger side, but it's probably like most things "every dept is different" and you gotta do what you gotta do.


    Originally posted by mp1161 View Post
    Every situation is different (I work dayshift so I am only referring to dayshift). Without going into tactics, there are advantages, more so than less exposure to the roadway of passing cars of doing a passenger-side approach. I typically walk around my vehicle when utilizing this approach. However, I do know officers on dayshift that walk in between the car to get to the passenger side. Again, without going into detail, it lets you get to the passenger side quicker than walking around the patrol car. I'm sure you can guess at a few reasons why it would be a good idea to approach a car from the passenger side quickly.
    Yeah that's why I thought it would be strange to limit the officer's discretion on when to cross between the vehicles. I have a sheriff's office I am hopefully about to get hired on with as a dispatcher. I will have to ask them what their guidelines are for this situation since it seems like it definitely varies from place to place.

    Thanks for the replies btw.

    Leave a comment:


  • mp1161
    replied
    Every situation is different (I work dayshift so I am only referring to dayshift). Without going into tactics, there are advantages, more so than less exposure to the roadway of passing cars of doing a passenger-side approach. I typically walk around my vehicle when utilizing this approach. However, I do know officers on dayshift that walk in between the car to get to the passenger side. Again, without going into detail, it lets you get to the passenger side quicker than walking around the patrol car. I'm sure you can guess at a few reasons why it would be a good idea to approach a car from the passenger side quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • LA DEP
    replied
    If a supervisor sees you walk in between your radio car and the car you have stopped out here FOR ANY REASON, I can almost guarantee that you will get written up for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • benseventeen
    started a topic Officer safety question

    Officer safety question

    I was reading another thread and saw a user had posted this:

    Originally posted by DCH
    Saw a deputy yesterday walk around to his rear trunk and around to the passenger side spot light so he could point it at the driver's rearview, then he WALKED IN BETWEEN HIS CAR AND THE SUBJECT'S CAR as he made contact with the driver.

    HUGE NO-NO with most local depts. training and officer safety standards.

    ..but then again, what could go wrong right? rolleyes
    It was in a LEO only section, and it was kind of an old thread, so I thought I would start a new thread on the topic and ask my question. Hope that's okay.

    I understand the idea that it might not be safe to walk in between your patrol car and the subject's car when conducting a traffic stop, but I live in Florida and have seen some FHP troopers exit their vehicles and walk in between the 2 cars to approach from the passenger side of the subject's car, even if the subject's car was pulled well off the highway (I saw a couple episodes of speeders and the Florida Highway Patrol was on it a few times).

    Is this just because the stop is on a highway and it's safer to walk between the cars rather than be exposed to the crazy drivers going by at 90mph? Or is this idea to not walk between the 2 cars just not very prevalent? I'm not a law enforcement officer, but I'm currently in the process of becoming a dispatcher and eventually want to be a deputy, so I get curious about these details.

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