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  • Another background question

    Yes, another "how bad is my past?" post. I feel like I have more or less kept my nose clean my entire life, but reading some of these posts made me wonder. I would like to be a police officer either in North Las Vegas or Phoenix ideally. I live very far from both of these places and applying will obviously entail a certain amount of expense in both time and money. I would like to make sure that I'm not automatically disqualified before I make such an investment. Apart from the following few items, I should be perfectly fine. Most of my employment history is excellent with plenty of leadership positions. My credit is excellent. I did extremely well in school and received many academic honors. I have absolutely no criminal record. I know I will do extremely well on the written test, pass the physical agility test with ease, and I usually do very well in interviews and intend to do all of the research and preparation possible. The only thing I'm concerned about is the background check. Here are all of the possible issues I can think of. Any input is appreciated. Thanks.

    1. The job I held between March 2006 and October 2007 terminated my employment. The general manager learned that I intended to quit at the end of that month because I could not afford to stay. I was a car sales rep and the winter in Wisconsin is very lean. A week after that I was called in by the sales managers who informed me that "it was time for me to explore a different path" and that if I wasn't 100% serious about the job they didn't want me around. I didn't have anything immediately lined up after and was on unemployment insurance for a little more than a month. During that time they attempted to claim lack of job performance, but everything was resolved in my favor.
    2. The job I am currently at is really not for me. I think I will have to find something new in the next week or two. I never really meanth the job as permanent employment and honestly I am just not very naturally good at it. It is a warehouse job where I stack 200+ boxes on a pallet up to 6-7 feet tall and I have to do it within a standard time. I am always just shy of the standard and have been "councilled" about it twice. This is not a step of formal discipline just a heads-up that it could be coming. I don't think I can stand to be there another 2 months, let alone 6-8. I want very much to either take a security job which will give hands-on experience applicable to my current true job goal or go back to working as a lifeguard, which I did for a total of 5 years at 2 different jobs, both of which loved me and gave me ample leadership and supervisory opportunities.
    3. My driving record has been clean for almost 3 years. Prior to that I had a couple of car accidents (one due to inexperience in snowy weather, the other someone ran a red light but the blame got split between us). I also had 2 tickets (one was dismissed, the other amended to "blocking traffic with slow speed"). I have never received a DUI, but I do occasionally have a little to drink before driving, definitely not enough to receive a DUI. I can not say for sure if this was the case when I turned 21 two years ago. I never drove drunk, but I do not know for sure if it was as strictly controlled as it is today. Again, I was never formally cited or even suspected of it. I just wish to be one hundred percent honest. The only other question that sparked my interest dealt with hit and run. I was never cited with it, but I know I have scoffed a couple of vehicles in parking lots, never putting any damage on them that a buff job wouldn't cure. I was always under the
    impression that damage from such incidents needed to exceed a certain amount to be considered hit and run, but again I'm trying to make sure that my answers are honest, but will not disqualify me.
    4. I have no real involvement with drugs. That being said, I have used someone else's perscription before. When my perscriptions ran out my mother used to have me take one of my family member's similar perscriptions until she filled it and other cases similar to that. These have been allergy meds and acid reflux meds. The only other thing I could think of was I loaned a friend money once and someone tried to tell me that he used it to buy drugs. I don't even think he did, but it's what I've been told.
    5. This never came up in the questionnaire, but I was diagnosed with depression at the age of 18. I still suffer from it occasionally. I'd be surprised if the doctor would even pick up on it in the psychological exam, but it is easy to find in my records. I don't feel that it would affect my ability to perform the job.

  • #2
    All you can do concerning the employment issues is to be honest concerning them. I really don't see any major problems for you there. Employment history problems come up when terminations for insubordination, work place violence, or integrity issues are the cause. Taking the medication your Mother instructed you to take probably won't be an issue, although it should be explained if the issue comes up. The only potential issue I see in your post is that of depression. It could emerge as an issue, especially if you're taking medication for it. That issue won't really be resolved on this forum, but will be determined by the agency to which you apply. You can expect to address all of these events when you complete your Personal History Statement, Background Packet, or Polygraph Questionaire. Honesty will be your best friend there.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
      Yes, another "how bad is my past?" post. I feel like I have more or less kept my nose clean my entire life, but reading some of these posts made me wonder. I would like to be a police officer either in North Las Vegas or Phoenix ideally. I live very far from both of these places and applying will obviously entail a certain amount of expense in both time and money. I would like to make sure that I'm not automatically disqualified before I make such an investment. Apart from the following few items, I should be perfectly fine. Most of my employment history is excellent with plenty of leadership positions. My credit is excellent. I did extremely well in school and received many academic honors. I have absolutely no criminal record. I know I will do extremely well on the written test, pass the physical agility test with ease, and I usually do very well in interviews and intend to do all of the research and preparation possible. The only thing I'm concerned about is the background check. Here are all of the possible issues I can think of. Any input is appreciated. Thanks.

      1. The job I held between March 2006 and October 2007 terminated my employment. The general manager learned that I intended to quit at the end of that month because I could not afford to stay. I was a car sales rep and the winter in Wisconsin is very lean. A week after that I was called in by the sales managers who informed me that "it was time for me to explore a different path" and that if I wasn't 100% serious about the job they didn't want me around. I didn't have anything immediately lined up after and was on unemployment insurance for a little more than a month. During that time they attempted to claim lack of job performance, but everything was resolved in my favor.
      2. The job I am currently at is really not for me. I think I will have to find something new in the next week or two. I never really meanth the job as permanent employment and honestly I am just not very naturally good at it. It is a warehouse job where I stack 200+ boxes on a pallet up to 6-7 feet tall and I have to do it within a standard time. I am always just shy of the standard and have been "councilled" about it twice. This is not a step of formal discipline just a heads-up that it could be coming. I don't think I can stand to be there another 2 months, let alone 6-8. I want very much to either take a security job which will give hands-on experience applicable to my current true job goal or go back to working as a lifeguard, which I did for a total of 5 years at 2 different jobs, both of which loved me and gave me ample leadership and supervisory opportunities.
      3. My driving record has been clean for almost 3 years. Prior to that I had a couple of car accidents (one due to inexperience in snowy weather, the other someone ran a red light but the blame got split between us). I also had 2 tickets (one was dismissed, the other amended to "blocking traffic with slow speed"). I have never received a DUI, but I do occasionally have a little to drink before driving, definitely not enough to receive a DUI. I can not say for sure if this was the case when I turned 21 two years ago. I never drove drunk, but I do not know for sure if it was as strictly controlled as it is today. Again, I was never formally cited or even suspected of it. I just wish to be one hundred percent honest. The only other question that sparked my interest dealt with hit and run. I was never cited with it, but I know I have scoffed a couple of vehicles in parking lots, never putting any damage on them that a buff job wouldn't cure. I was always under the
      impression that damage from such incidents needed to exceed a certain amount to be considered hit and run, but again I'm trying to make sure that my answers are honest, but will not disqualify me.
      4. I have no real involvement with drugs. That being said, I have used someone else's perscription before. When my perscriptions ran out my mother used to have me take one of my family member's similar perscriptions until she filled it and other cases similar to that. These have been allergy meds and acid reflux meds. The only other thing I could think of was I loaned a friend money once and someone tried to tell me that he used it to buy drugs. I don't even think he did, but it's what I've been told.
      5. This never came up in the questionnaire, but I was diagnosed with depression at the age of 18. I still suffer from it occasionally. I'd be surprised if the doctor would even pick up on it in the psychological exam, but it is easy to find in my records. I don't feel that it would affect my ability to perform the job.
      I agree with PhilipCal. Honesty is your best friend when applying for a job in LE. In regards to prescription meds, it won't be a huge issue. I assume, you were not taking them to abuse them, weren't selling them, and weren't stealing them. You loaned a friend money, and he MAY have bought drugs with the money? That is something that is way beyond your control, don't even let that worry you, because its something very trivial that won't even be an issue. If he explicitly told you he needed money to buy drugs and you loaned it to him, that would be slightly different story, but still nothing that would DQ you. As far as the depression, this may be a slight road-block for you. Above all, be honest. Don't sweat the small stuff and always be honest. No one is perfect!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Brianda,

        I have to disagree with the other posters. Having read your message I've got to tell you that several red flags jumped out and if I was your background investigator, I would give you a lot of extra scrutiny.

        First, let's start with the car sales job. You say you were going to quit at the end of the month because sales were lean and you couldn't afford to stay. You also indicated that they fired you when they learned you were going to leave,claiming lack of performance as an excuse for doing so. Here's the problem - most people who "can't afford" to stay at a job, don't plan to quit on such short notice without having another job waiting. Yet, you said you didn't have another job lined up to go to and wound up on unemployment. Reading between the lines, it sounds like you got fired because your sales were low and you are making up a story to save face.

        You say you never meant your current job to be permanent. Why is that? Is it because you have been counseled twice that your performance is sub-standard and that disciplinary action may be coming? Rather than improve your performance, it sounds like you are quitting to avoid being disciplined.

        With regard to the traffic accident, you say someone else ran a red light but the blame got split between the two of you. What exactly does that mean?. Each of you does not get half of a red light on your record. If you were found at fault for something, you need to spell it out and not hide behind the other driver's red light violation.

        You say you loaned a friend money, that a second person told you the friend used it to buy drugs, but you don't believe it. Did you ever think to ask the person you loaned the money to? Most people would.

        Please don't misunderstand the tone of my message. I am not trying to belittle you or give you a hard time. My whole point here is that your post is full of weasel words and dances around the issues so much as to suggest that you are being less than forthcoming. This is going to make any BI look at you very, very hard. If what I suspect is true, these issues could be glitches in your background. However, they would be minor glitches compared to what would happen if your BI caught you being less than honest about them.

        I would urge you to step back and reassess these issues. If you have been honest, you need revise your presentation to be direct, to the point, not dance around and not be contradictory. OTOH, if you left a few things out or may have been less than accurate, you need to fix that as well.

        Just food for thought.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • #5
          The most direct story about the sales job is about a month before they fired me I told a couple of my friends there that I was looking for other work and did not intend to stay. A couple days before I was fired the GM asked me about the rumor and I confirmed it. Then the sales managers called me into the office and only one of them really did the talking. This same manager also routinely insturcted sales people to lie to customers. I do admit that my performance and attitude steadily declined since he was there. I can't fully blame him because I should have left a long time ago.

          Mr current job is just decent money for the time being while I try to sell my car and reduce my costs so I can afford to work somewhere that I can enjoy more. Most people who take that job quit within 3 months as it is. I have a very difficult time stacking odd-shaped boxes over 6 feet tall on a moving pallet. The only reason that my last counsel wasn't a verbal warning is because my supervisor knows that I am trying as hard as I can. On top of all that all of the new employee's have had their hours reduced during the slow season. I can work elsewhere and make the same money easily now.

          She ran the red light. I probably should have seen her coming. She had a "witness" sitting next to her in the car who lied for her. I believe the officer on the scene indicated that he presumed it was my fault but issued no tickets. The insurance companies couldn't even reach the lady for a statement and assigned equal fault. It will have occurred 3 years ago in March.

          Someone who didn't like the guy said he bought drugs with it. The guy I loaned it to says that was not the case. Honestly, in retrospect, I think he gambled it away. I was dumb to loan him anything, but I can live with the consequences.

          Oddly enough, everyone else mentioned the depression, but you didn't. Any take on that?

          Thanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Although L-1 was not in agreement with my reply to you, I have learned that his posts are very thoughtful and incisive. One of the many good things on these forums is the varying views and opinions we often have. I would suggest that you look over the replies you have recieved, and hopefully, use them to your advantage. By that I mean, decisions you have made, relative to your employment can't really be revisited. You will come to the agency you apply with, as a less than perfect candidate. Don't agonize too much over that, because it applies to most of us, and certainly,I include myself in that catagory. It's very probable that you'll be asked about your work history at some phase in the process. When that happens, put your history on the table. Avoid excuses, or rationalization. In the meantime, make every attempt to do the best possible job you can , and work at building a solid, dependable work history.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
              The most direct story about the sales job is about a month before they fired me I told a couple of my friends there that I was looking for other work and did not intend to stay. A couple days before I was fired the GM asked me about the rumor and I confirmed it. Then the sales managers called me into the office and only one of them really did the talking. This same manager also routinely insturcted sales people to lie to customers. I do admit that my performance and attitude steadily declined since he was there. I can't fully blame him because I should have left a long time ago.

              Mr current job is just decent money for the time being while I try to sell my car and reduce my costs so I can afford to work somewhere that I can enjoy more. Most people who take that job quit within 3 months as it is. I have a very difficult time stacking odd-shaped boxes over 6 feet tall on a moving pallet. The only reason that my last counsel wasn't a verbal warning is because my supervisor knows that I am trying as hard as I can. On top of all that all of the new employee's have had their hours reduced during the slow season. I can work elsewhere and make the same money easily now.

              She ran the red light. I probably should have seen her coming. She had a "witness" sitting next to her in the car who lied for her. I believe the officer on the scene indicated that he presumed it was my fault but issued no tickets. The insurance companies couldn't even reach the lady for a statement and assigned equal fault. It will have occurred 3 years ago in March.

              Someone who didn't like the guy said he bought drugs with it. The guy I loaned it to says that was not the case. Honestly, in retrospect, I think he gambled it away. I was dumb to loan him anything, but I can live with the consequences.

              Oddly enough, everyone else mentioned the depression, but you didn't. Any take on that?

              Thanks.
              Hi Brianda,

              It all comes down to presentation. Your explanations regarding employment still sound complicated and self serving.

              With respect to the auto sales job, no matter how you spin it, it still sounds like your sales figures were down, you were counseled regarding your performance, your sales and attitude continued to go downhill and you were eventually terminated because of that. Tossing in that your boss routinely told salespeople to lie only looks like you are attempting to divert attention from your own shortcomings. (After all, most people think all auto salespeople routinely lie anyway.) Reading between the lines I think this is what you were trying to say: Auto sales is a business where you are expected to pressure (and sometimes mislead) customers into making expensive purchases they are sometimes reluctant to do. (Someone comes in looking for a used Ford and you are expected to sell them a new BMW with all the bells and whistles.) You couldn't do this in good conscience and as a result, you didn't meet your sales quotas and were terminated. I would have a lot more respect for that story than the one you posted

              With respect to your current job, you have thrown in so much information that it really looks like you are hiding something. People not lasting more than three months, trying to reduce costs, selling your car, etc., has nothing to do with why you are leaving. If you are having trouble stacking boxes that high within the required amount of time, I would simply go with your being physically unable to perform the duties of the position. (It sounds like you are too short.) There is no shame in that. Certain jobs require certain sizes. This should not affect you for a law enforcement position as long as you are within the height requirements for the department you are applying with.

              As far as the red light is concerned, what your insurance company decided doesn't matter, it's what the officer decided. You need to see what he wrote on his report before you state for a certainty who was at fault.

              If you asked the person you loaned money to, he denied buying drugs and there is no other evidence, then you had no involvement. But, it bothers you enough to bring it up in response to that question. This suggests an uncertainty on your part. You will probably need to discuss it with your BI in order to get past the poly.

              I didn't address your depression because it is a medical issue that I have no expertise in. That area will be covered by the psych exam rather than the background. I wouldn't worry too much if you fail the psych the first time out. I have seen people fail a psych one week and pass one the next. It all seems to depend on who is interpreting the results. As you read posts on this board you will find people here who fail one psych only to pass another. It's kind of a crapshoot.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                I guess I don't mind putting things in that manner as long as they are not going to be held against me. Let me put it this way. If I say the following will it look better and how much will it be held against me? I was terminated for not meeting my employer's expectations which I felt were unethical. I quit my next job because I did not feel comfortable with my ability to perform it. And my current job (whatever it may be) I have only been on for a few months, but it is going very well (hopefully). I had a minor traffic accident three years ago in which the officer on the scene assumed I was at fault, but issued no citation.

                I'm not too concerned about that last issue. As for the psych eval, they allow you to take the test mutlitple times? You don't have to go through the entire process again and wait several more months, do you?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                  I guess I don't mind putting things in that manner as long as they are not going to be held against me. Let me put it this way. If I say the following will it look better and how much will it be held against me? I was terminated for not meeting my employer's expectations which I felt were unethical. I quit my next job because I did not feel comfortable with my ability to perform it. And my current job (whatever it may be) I have only been on for a few months, but it is going very well (hopefully). I had a minor traffic accident three years ago in which the officer on the scene assumed I was at fault, but issued no citation.

                  I'm not too concerned about that last issue. As for the psych eval, they allow you to take the test mutlitple times? You don't have to go through the entire process again and wait several more months, do you?
                  My suggestion here is, "I was terminated for not meeting my employer's expectations." Stop there. When you add ,"which I felt were unethical", your back into shifting part of the blame back on your former boss. I understand how very tempting it is to do that, but it simply won't play to your advantage. The explanation for leaving the second job sounds okay. The explanation of the accident should be okay too. Very possibly, the Background interviewer, Recruiter, etc will ask you to amplify your replies, but again, simply be factual.
                  Re: The psych, I don't want to hazard a guess on that. The agency's reply to that question is the one that matters.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                    I guess I don't mind putting things in that manner as long as they are not going to be held against me.
                    You have just identified the very heart of the problem. You are unwilling to accept responsibility for your shortcomings. That doesn't work in law enforcement, This is a job where you are expected to gather facts and present them clearly, concisely and without bias. Yet, you are unable to do so when it comes to yourself (and all of these issues with your job are really minor stuff in the grand scheme of things). So if you can't be candid about minor stuff, what kind of whoppers will you tell about major issues? How can you be trusted to tell the truth as a police officer? If I was your BI I would probably DQ you, not because your employers said you missed your sales quotas or because you weren't tall enough to stack the boxes high enough in a set amount of time, but because you danced me around about it when I interviewed you regarding those issues. In doing so, I would say that your inability to discuss these matters in a frank and forthright manner demonstrates that you lack the traits of integrity, honesty, dependability, thoroughness, accuracy, good judgment, the ability to work cooperatively with others, and the willingness and ability to assume the responsibilities and to conform to the conditions of work characteristic of the employment, all of which are minimum requirements for the job.

                    Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                    Let me put it this way. If I say the following will it look better and how much will it be held against me? I was terminated for not meeting my employer's expectations which I felt were unethical.
                    As PhilipCal pointed out, you are shifting blame. If you tried that on me I would ask what you did to correct your boss' unethical conduct? Did you report him to the auto dealership's owner or the state agency that regulates auto sales? If not, why not? How is it that your boss' conduct was so bad that it caused you to quit, but not bad enough to report it to someone who could fix it and keep others from being victimized? Is this the type of mentality that is appropriate for a police candidate? Again, your story smells. Recommend Applicant be DQed - lacks the traits of honesty, dependability, thoroughness, accuracy and good judgment.

                    Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                    I quit my next job because I did not feel comfortable with my ability to perform it.
                    Given the issues with the other two jobs, I would expect lots of questions here. Why couldn't you perform it? When you first applied for the job, what steps did you take to learn about its requirements and whether you could perform them, etc.? Be prepard with the right answers. Otherwise, you may look like someone who has trouble holding a job.

                    Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                    I had a minor traffic accident three years ago in which the officer on the scene assumed I was at fault, but issued no citation.
                    One of the first things you will learn in the academy is that cops do not assume. Again, you need to get a copy of the written accident report and see what it says - it's the only thing that counts. If it says you were at fault, then you were. If it doesn't say you were at fault, then you weren't. Don't attribute blame until you know for certain.

                    Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                    As for the psych eval, they allow you to take the test mutlitple times? You don't have to go through the entire process again and wait several more months, do you?
                    Usualy, you only get to take it once for the agency you are applying with. But most people apply with multiple agencies at the same time. The may pass the test at one place and fail it at another.
                    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I must admit I am now a little taken aback. I am trying to figure out how best to put these facts and you seem to be calling me lazy, irresponsible liar.

                      I would be lying if I said I deserved to be fired. I did report him to the GM. He's still there and I'm not. It's a part of the business I guess. I do not mind saying "I was terminated for not meeting my employer's expectations." I don't even mind saying that my sales figures were only average in my last few months there while they were much higher when I began. If questioned about specific reasons why, then I can only in good conscience "dance around."

                      As far as the accident, I would be exhibiting the complete opposite of those traits that you mentioned if I said I agreed with the police report that I was *probably* and it did say "probably" at fault. The officer observed that the light did show a green arrow from the direction I was coming, but the other lady had a friend in the car who corraborated her story. He did not see the accident. It was not recorded. There were no neutral witnesses. Again, I do not mind saying that I have an accident on record where the officer found me at fault. Any other questions and I must tell the truth as I honestly saw it. To say "yes I was at fault" just to get a job would be dishonest and unethical in my opinion.

                      I realize that I must sound defensive, but I feel as though you are attacking me on a personal level and you don't even know me. I have a very strong set of personal morals and ethics that I vigorously stand by and defend. I despise laziness. I am extremely dependable. I am a terrible liar and I know that people can see right through me when I do. My word is my bond. I am a perfectionist and extremely precise. I put a great deal of though into all of my actions and beliefs. I am a team player and natural leader. I can support each one of those claims with evidence and witnesses. I do not rely on outside sources to tell me these things about myself and reinforce them. I know them on a very deep personal level.

                      Please do feel free to give me positive and constructive feedback. Tell me how I can phrase my statements to best increase my chances of a positive review without completely selling out the truth, as I see it. Thank you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Brianda, I can only speak for myself, but at no point did I get the idea that anyone was calling you either a liar, or irresponsible. You came to the forum and asked a question. In my view, we attempted to give you an honest answer. You are absolutely correct when you note that we really don't know you. That is a point I made on another thread. I would suggest to you though, that a Background Investigator, Polygraph Examiner, or members of an Oral Board, won't really know you either. What they will come away with is an impression. Rightly or wrongly, that impression is what will determine whether or not you continue in the process. The things we have suggested to you, were geared to your making a better impression with an agency you've applied to. The process you're dealing with is admitedly imperfect. In most cases, it's very structured and quite formal. It's also a fact of life. Most of us have dealt with it in the past, you're dealing with it presently. I believe our only goal was to try to help you deal with it successfully.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by brianda3 View Post
                          I must admit I am now a little taken aback. I am trying to figure out how best to put these facts and you seem to be calling me lazy, irresponsible liar.
                          That was not my intention and I apologize if I have given offense. I do not know you, nor do I know what is in your mind or in your heart. However, you did ask for advice and I gave you my honest impression based solely on what you posted.

                          Some of what you said was contradictory. Other things made no sense. A few contained a lot of superfluous information that seemed calculated to divert attention from the issues. In my experience, when someone does this it creates the appearance that they lack one or more of the following traits:

                          Integrity

                          Honesty

                          Dependability

                          Thoroughness

                          Accuracy

                          Good judgment

                          Ability to work cooperatively with others

                          Willingness and ability to assume the responsibilities and to conform to the conditions of work characteristic of the employment

                          Each and every one of these traits is a minimum requirement for a job with my agency. If, during your background, you do anything to indicate you lack a single one of these traits, you can get DQed. It doesn't matter if you were dishonest or just weren't thorough in your answers. Either way its a DQ and your BI moves on to the next applicant. It's not a problem if you honestly err on a few questions. But you have made it clear that you do not want to say anything that is adverse to your interests. If your Bi determines that you have withheld relevant information or you waffle with him on negative areas, you will get DQed as being dishonest. If you don't believe me, do a search of the threads here on o.com. You will find posts from many applicants who either withheld negative information, overly sugarcoated things, conveniently "forgot" negative information until their BI found it, or misled their BI and all got DQed.

                          Law enforcement operates under something known as the Brady decision. In essence, it says that in a criminal case, the defense has a right to know all exculpatory evidence including whether officers involved in a case have a history of untruthfulness. In turn, this information is used to challenge the officer's credibility on the stand, making them useless as a witness. As a result, officers who are caught lying are usually terminated. Similarly, applicants who appear to lie on their backgrounds or who are not thorough enough to give accurate answers are also DQed. That's why this is so important.
                          Last edited by L-1; 02-02-2008, 06:56 PM.
                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I absolutely understand. I have no problem disclosing the exact truth on any of those questions. The exact truth is that I was terminated from the sales job. During the meeting they cited "unmanageability" as their reason for termination. When I applied for unemployment insurance they cited "lack of performance." That being said, there are certainly extinuating circumstances I am willing to discuss if need be. I will leave my current job because I do not enjoy it and I do not feel I can excel within it. I will persue something that is maybe more applicable to my current goals and which I can excel in, even if it pays less. About three years ago I was involved in a minor traffic accident. The officer on the scene determined that I was likely at fault, but issued no citation. Are these fair and honest assessments of my situation? What do I say if further questioned? Am I still a qualified candidate providing that everything else in the application process is above average? I do not wish to make excuses. I honestly don't think that the car accident will be held against me even if it were my fault. The job thing is a little less clear. If I need to hold down a steady job for over a year, then I will. I just want to know if it would be in my best interest to begin applying for a law enforcement job now or after I've reestablished my job history. Thank you for your understanding and patience.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Brianda,

                              There isn't alot you can do about what happened in the past. Whatever you do, don't minimize any mistake that you have made, no matter how small. Typically, mistakes of the mind can be forgiven, mistakes of the heart can not.

                              The biggest red flag I see, is that when the going gets tough, you quit, and that could be a problem.

                              The best advice I can give you is...don't quit your current job. Tough it out, work on getting better and then use your accomplishment to your advantage when applying to p.d.'s. I hated my previous job (sales), I wanted to quit on a daily basis. Quitting would have been easy. Blaming my bosses would have been even easier. I stuck it out for five years and I am better for it.
                              sigpic"To punish and enslave"

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