Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Timeline during the hiring process

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Timeline during the hiring process

    I’m currently in the hiring pipeline with a department. I did the written and physical on 6/19 and the polygraph on 6/23. If I remember correctly my next step is the oral board. How long is the process on average? I’m avoiding sending an email to ask any questions, but I did send an email last week to update that I had applied to another department and drop off my college transcripts/degree. I got a thank you reply and I’m taking that as a good sign for now. It’s hard to be on this side of it and not know when the next step will happen.

  • #2
    There is no "average." Some departments are quick, others are slow. Some have openings that need to be filled yesterday, others are just compiling lists for potential future openings. Some have the money for new LEO's in the bank, others have it "proposed" for the next fiscal cycle. Some have the time and manpower to work the process, others have to give officers extra duty on top of their "real work" to get it done. And that's not even considering where you stand in the list of potentials (the lower on the list, the longer before they got to you...if they do at all).

    The mantra in public safety hiring is "hurry up and wait." Get used to it. Apply to other agencies. Polish your resume. Take some college classes. Just don't bug them about your "status," especially if you havn't even taken your oral interview yet....you're a LONG way from the finish line.
    "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
    -Friedrich Nietzsche

    Comment


    • #3
      The department I’m applying with isn’t a large one and needs 5-6 officers. I was hoping it would go a little faster. If I hadn’t gone active duty and let my certification lapse it would likely be a faster process. I’ll keep waiting. I suppose no news is good news. As far as I know, from talking to officers on ride alongs, I’m probably sitting at the top of the list. I may do some more college in the meantime. I’ll be changing my graduate degree from secondary education to something law enforcement related. I substitute taught for a year and realized I do not want to do that.

      Comment


      • #4
        It’s totally random and dependent on the agency. It could be a few months or a few years. Apply broadly so you don’t burn years on one agency only to be a non select.

        I don’t know if a criminal justice grad degree helps much, but better than an education degree. I have a law degree and always tell people I would have rather gained LE experience instead of spending those three years in academia.

        Comment


        • #5
          DO NOT swap to anything CJ related,.....stand apart from the crowd.

          You'll be taught CJ in the Academy and by your FTO.

          Comment


          • Winter_Patriot
            Winter_Patriot commented
            Editing a comment
            Maybe public policy or public admin? Might help if in an upper leadership position

          • AirborneJones
            AirborneJones commented
            Editing a comment
            What about a master’s in criminal justice administration and management (applied criminology)? I’m kicking other ideas around for a graduate degree. I may take a little longer to settle on one. I’m pretty burnt out on college at the moment. I changed my undergrad degree a few times and ended up with more than 160 hours. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do after I got medically retired from the military.

          • Aidokea
            Aidokea commented
            Editing a comment
            Listen to NolaT. Don't do ANYTHING that is CJ related. A degree in CJ is no more useful in law enforcement than any other kind of degree, but it is utterly useless outside of law enforcement.

          • AirborneJones
            AirborneJones commented
            Editing a comment
            That makes sense. I remember the criminal justice classes I took years ago being very similar to the academy. I’ll settle on something else after some more research.

        • #6
          Business, business administration, management

          Comment


          • #7
            Let's get hired first before we start taking graduate classes,.......

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by AirborneJones
              I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do after I got medically retired from the military.
              What is the nature of your injury? Is it something that might lead to a medical DQ by a LE agency?

              While medical standards in LE and military aren't necessarily the same, there IS quite a bit of overlap.

              Comment


              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                I had three strokes, but no paralyzation on either side. I had issues like anyone would after a brain injury. With time I healed and I am good to go. I am fully cleared to do anything I want to do.

              • CCCSD
                CCCSD commented
                Editing a comment
                While your MD may say you are good, the agency may differ.

              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                That’s fine, but I literally have nothing wrong with me now and the cause of the strokes was fixed. I guess I’ll have to wait and see what happens.

              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                I’ve read through the TCOLE medical requirements and the disqualifications for multiple police departments in Texas. I haven’t seen a stroke or CVA listed as a disqualification. I have seen some of the issues cause by strokes listed as disqualifications, but I’m within the limits on how long I experienced them and how long it has been since I’ve experienced them. I had my strokes in 2013 and I’ve been 100% since late 2015. That doesn’t mean I’m definitely good to go. It does mean I’m not immediately disqualified for most places.

            • #9
              What branch were you in, and how long were you active?

              Did you actually Retire or were you Discharged due to a medical issue?

              Comment


              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                I was Army Guard. Enlisted as infantry into an airborne unit and then went into recruiting for far too long. I spent close to 8 years in recruiting. I was medically retired in 2015. I had three strokes due to a vertebral artery dissection. That has all been fixed. It took some time to recover and I was lucky to not have any paralyzation on either side. I’m fully cleared to do whatever I want now. It just took a little while for my brain to heal from all of that. After I got out I finished my degree and currently have a 4.0 at the graduate level.

              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                Medical retirement and not traditional retirement.

            • #10
              Jones, you should remove your city from your profile.

              Anyone can read this forum, including the segment of the population in places like Portland, where they want cops (and their families) dead, and those feelings probably extend to people like you, who aspire to become a cop.

              Comment


              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                Will do. Thanks.

              • Aidokea
                Aidokea commented
                Editing a comment
                Good job...

            • #11
              Anonymity is your friend,......in these times especially,

              Comment


              • Aidokea
                Aidokea commented
                Editing a comment
                Yup. I moved to Texas, bought a ranch in a rural area, and keep a pretty low profile since retirement. Don't really need someone from my past looking me up to discuss asset forfeiture and the house that they used to own, especially since ammo prices have gotten so crazy...

            • #12
              What area of the country are you applying to? Just like it was mentioned it could be months or years. In my experience places like Pennsylvania are 8mo to a year while Washington state ie, Federal way, Everett etc currently is 3 months max from app to start date.
              Delaware County Community College Municipal Police Academy Class 126: July-Dec 2009

              Comment


              • Winter_Patriot
                Winter_Patriot commented
                Editing a comment
                People are fleeing Seattle area PDs. Seattle PD has fewer officers now than in the 80s, and the city had doubled in size since then. In the south or Midwest, there's probably a more stable hiring environment.

              • AirborneJones
                AirborneJones commented
                Editing a comment
                I’m applying in Texas.

            • #13
              I got the call about 30 minutes ago that I’m scheduled for the oral board this Tuesday at 7pm.

              Comment


              • #14
                Congratulations!

                Comment


                • #15
                  My oral board seemed to go well tonight. I could always be wrong in that, but there were plenty of times in our 30 minute meeting that they nodded their heads in agreement or smiled at my answers. I did answer one question wrong, but I think I recovered well. It was a scenario. Basically, I arrive to backup my partner and there is a man on top of him beating him senseless. He tells me to shoot him…that’s where I was given 2 seconds to give my answer. I said I would tase him. They immediately said I should have trusted my partner and shot him because my taser caused him pull the trigger on his gun I couldn’t see and shoot my partner. They stressed you need to trust you partner and that they all trust each other. I responded that I don’t know any of them and that my answer was based on that. I don’t have that trust, but I would if I worked with them. That seemed to go over well. They said most people say they would tackle to tase the guy. I immediately thought about shooting him, but I didn’t know he had a gun. I think it went pretty well overall and I hope I hear something soon. They only had two of us boarding. I should have asked about the chief interview because they currently don’t have a chief. I’d likely have a chief interview with the acting chief. The deputy chief was on my board.

                  Comment


                  • Winter_Patriot
                    Winter_Patriot commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I think in some very urban, left-leaning jurisdictions, your answer might have been the correct one. I've seen inquests against officers in similar situations.

                  • AirborneJones
                    AirborneJones commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I really hate that I said taser because my first instinct was to shoot. In my mind I thought that the beating could have been deadly force and I second guessed because I wasn’t told there was a weapon. I guess that’s a lesson in not second guessing yourself.

                  • AirborneJones
                    AirborneJones commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I keep thinking about the scenario. If he’s on top beating my partner then he is likely in a top mount position. That’s how I see it in my mind. In that sort of position I would have been able to see if he had a gun or not. It just seems like a gotcha scenario in a way, but I guess that’s real life policing a lot of the time.

                  • Bing_Oh
                    Bing_Oh commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It's certainly not a "gotcha" scenario. Deadly force is justified to protect yourself or another from the immediate threat of serious physical harm or death. No weapon is necessary to cause serious physical harm or death to another...a person could easily beat a person to death with their bare hands or grab their head and beat it into the pavement in a "top mount" position. The officer in your scenario clearly believed that he was in imminent risk of serious physical harm or death (as represented by his statement for you to shoot the suspect) and the suspect's actions support this conclusion.

                    The assumption that access to a weapon is required to justify deadly force is a fallacy common amongst those who have never seriously considered the scenario and/or have not been trained. It's also been reinforced by recent backlash against legitimate use of force by LE that has been misunderstood and misrepresented in the public. What we understand in LE is that use of force is never pretty and usually misunderstood by the public, even when it's totally justified.

                MR300x250 Tablet

                Collapse

                What's Going On

                Collapse

                There are currently 3112 users online. 174 members and 2938 guests.

                Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                Welcome Ad

                Collapse
                Working...
                X