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Workout regimen needed to survive academy :)

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  • Workout regimen needed to survive academy :)

    I am currently in the process for two departments, but in the back of my mind, I am fearing the academy. I am 6'0" tall, 145 lbs., in shape the best that I can. I'm an exercise induced asthmatic so no matter how much I work out, I have to work out harder than everyone else. I'm lucky to get two miles. I've been involved in athletics since I was very young and I continually maintain being in shape.

    My question is how can someone get prepped for the academy? I would really appreciate it if someone would suggest a really good workout regimen. I have done the Navy Seal one, which uses your own body weight consisting of running, push ups and sit ups...but the running is impractical in the amount of time you're expected to run a certain amount. I have to build up to it.

    The workout I'm doing now is walk/run one day with 2 sets of 15 pushups, then alternate the next day with running forwards and backwards in a pool for an hour, then side steps in the pool, followed by the above ab and pushup regimen.

    Thank you so much!!! ~Kristin
    "Concentrate on what cannot lie.....the evidence."

  • #2
    Ok, running is going to be a big thing in the academy. No matter which department you are going to join. On my department, the running alternated between running "sprints" on a track and distance running among the hills of Southern California. You mention that running 2 miles is tough for you, this may be a big problem for you.

    Push ups are a BIG thing in all academies. If this is a weak spot for you, concentrate on them. Crunches and the old fashioned situp are also a staple of academy PT. Pull ups are also something you may need to practice. How is your upper body strength? Between pull ups and dead weight drags, upper body strength will come into play here. Not to mention the wall climb which is all upper body strength. However, you mention you are 6' tall, so you will have an advantage with your height.
    Carpe Noctem

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    • #3
      Originally posted by EMVAMPYRE View Post
      Ok, running is going to be a big thing in the academy. No matter which department you are going to join. On my department, the running alternated between running "sprints" on a track and distance running among the hills of Southern California. You mention that running 2 miles is tough for you, this may be a big problem for you.

      Push ups are a BIG thing in all academies. If this is a weak spot for you, concentrate on them. Crunches and the old fashioned situp are also a staple of academy PT. Pull ups are also something you may need to practice. How is your upper body strength? Between pull ups and dead weight drags, upper body strength will come into play here. Not to mention the wall climb which is all upper body strength. However, you mention you are 6' tall, so you will have an advantage with your height.
      I understand that running is a big thing in the academy....that's why i need to know what to do at home to work up to doing 3 miles. I'm a pretty good sprint runner. I've been working on my pushups so my upper body strength has improved. I'm pretty good with crunches. I get over the 6 ft wall in 3.5 seconds...love the volleyball approach from playing sports. Any suggestions?
      "Concentrate on what cannot lie.....the evidence."

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      • #4
        Do you have a hard time running inside as well as outside? What I mean is, would running on a treadmill be easier than outside due to your asthma? What you may be able to do is work on your distance stamina by using a treadmill at a gym to increase your distances little by little. If you have an attack, you aren't in the middle of nowhere with no emrgency help at hand if it gets that bad. Start slow, jogging and gradually adding a little distance each day. The distance runs are mainly stamina builders and are not usually there to see how fast you can run 3-5 miles. I know in LA, the timed 1.5 mile run must be completed in 14 I minutes. Work up in increments till you can do a good 5 miles, if possible.

        Do you have the physical fitness requirements for the departments you want to apply for? (If you don't want to post the names of the departments, I understand.) There is also a POST certified test which all LEO's must pass prior to greaduating the academy and I believe that test is still listed on the California POST web site.
        Carpe Noctem

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        • #5
          To answer your questions:

          It could be because its outside. On the treadmill, I would have to say I do a lot better, but I don't like the pressure it puts on the knees every single time your foot goes down.

          Right now, I've been running where I live and I work up the distance that I'm running...I pace myself...I literally have to talk to myself in my head to concentrate on the breaking or keeping my back straight when I run.

          I have a friend who works at the department that I'm applying for, I can see if he'll make it a point to find out to find out what I'd have to be able to do in their academy.

          I'll go on POST's website and check that out as well.
          "Concentrate on what cannot lie.....the evidence."

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          • #6
            Workout Regimen

            Originally posted by EMVAMPYRE View Post
            Ok, running is going to be a big thing in the academy. No matter which department you are going to join. On my department, the running alternated between running "sprints" on a track and distance running among the hills of Southern California. You mention that running 2 miles is tough for you, this may be a big problem for you.

            Push ups are a BIG thing in all academies. If this is a weak spot for you, concentrate on them. Crunches and the old fashioned situp are also a staple of academy PT. Pull ups are also something you may need to practice. How is your upper body strength? Between pull ups and dead weight drags, upper body strength will come into play here. Not to mention the wall climb which is all upper body strength. However, you mention you are 6' tall, so you will have an advantage with your height.
            Right now, if you have a problem, it's the run. It's already been suggested, but you need to "build up" to the run. What happens in quite a few academies, is the class goes for an initial run, just to see where everyone is, and what work they need to do in order to make the run in the required time. You're going to need to spend some time doing the run. Do it on a track, or cross country. Build up incrementaly. As you become more able to do the distance in the required time, you'll also become more confident.

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            • #7
              I always hated running myself. I forced myself to start about 5 months ago, and can now run the 1.5 mile in 12 minutes. what I did at first was run 1/4 mile then walk and continue doing that. after a week i did 1/2 mile walk/run and kept building myself up to a mile then 2 miles. If i can do it, then so can you. Goodluck
              "The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible."
              Arthur C. Clarke

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              • #8
                i suffer sports induced asthma as well... and i was told by a doctor that its induced by the inability to warm the air before it goes into your lungs... which sends your body into the attack. how true that is i dont know. but a former classmate told me one time the key is to fill your lungs with air.. not just huffing and puffing when you start to wear out. i did my first 1.5 in almost 18... but after taking his advice and breathing deeply through my nose and exhaling through the mouth.. and lots of practice with this technique while not running (it helped me anyways) ... i was able to drop my time to 14:51.. and even further on the third run. worked for me so it might be worth a shot for you. keep your inhaler handy just in case tho if you use them.

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                • #9
                  What helps me:

                  I also suffer sports induced asthma, but I try to remain pretty active and train roughly 5-7 days a week.

                  Living in Mile High sea level does NOT help either!

                  What I have done, which helped me is:

                  1) I visited an Asthma/Allergy Specailist...not a general physician to get set on the right path.

                  2) I knew this was going to be a life-long commitment, and I strongly believe in maintaining (at least) some level of fitness in this line of work. My goal was NOT "What can I do to just get by in the academy" it became "What can I do to prevent my lungs caving in during a fight/foot chase, etc.?"

                  3) as many have already said, keep training and gradually increase the level of intensity or the time of your runs.

                  4) I also looked into sports supplementation and found a few things which helped me substantially better than the drugs my Dr. gave me:
                  -N02 supplements like NOW:AAKG, NOXPLODE, etc.
                  -A product called Vaso Pro made by mega pro (I believe) or something similar. it is an ephedrine HCL supplement (NOT to me mistaken for EPHEDRINE!!!) i purchase mine at a little oriental owned store close to my house for $12 and take it as needed, when I feel my lungs tightening.
                  -I also tried something I picked up at a natural foods/vitamin store called "Smoke Away" My wife got it to help with her smoking problem (i don't smoke) it's a spray containing licorice(sp?) root extract, tastes like hell, but works great!
                  "The world is a dangerous place; not because of those who do evil, but because of the good men that do nothing."
                  -A. Einstein

                  “As a man thinks in his heart, so he is.”
                  -(Proverbs 23:7)

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