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  • Gotta go

    So one topic on my mind that others may not have the same worry about is the need to go when on a call.
    We have all heard the stories of officers needing to pick a tree late at night to gain some much needed relief but taking things to the next level a bit. When I was in high school I injured myself and caused damage to my pelvic floor. After the injury there were time were I would have to pee every 20 minutes because my body couldn't hold it. Today and many years later I have come a long way at rebuilding the damaged muscles but still far from average. I can go anywhere from one to three hours without having to go. Could this be something that keeps me from getting on with a department? I often worry that I will find myself on a call and need to go but can't. I have been on two ride alongs with different departments and this wasn't an issue for either of those but the range of calls that we worked were lesser and considered average.

  • #2
    We never reveal tactical operations on an open forum
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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    • #3
      I'm not a guy. I think you could adapt and overcome this issue. Carry a bottle to pee in, if the need should arise

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
        We never reveal tactical operations on an open forum
        I'm retired so I can speak without undue restrictions. Back in the days of walking a beat for 10 hour shifts or working a patrol district I knew every nook and cranny of every alley and every secluded area, maybe a good screen of trees, so I never had a problem finding a place to wiz. Places where the Sam Browne belt could come off and I could sit down for a moment of contemplation was a different matter. In business districts with convenience stores, gas stations, restaurants, etc, usually not a problem. I remember one patrol district that included a very large city park and golf course, and I was able to talk the Parks & Rec manager out of a key to the rest room facilities. All the cops had a key that opened a "report room" at each city fire station, and there was a rest room in each. On the old downtown foot beat (48 years ago now) I had keys to several of the businesses, which saved business owners from having to drive into town to reset a balky alarm system in the middle of the night (also handy when the temperatures dropped down below zero. When the economy tanked, late 1970's to mid 1980's, there were repossessed houses all over town, mostly VA and FHA foreclosures with a common key lock-box, and a local real estate broker hooked me up with a copy.

        More strategic than tactical, in my opinion.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by retired1995 View Post

          I'm retired so I can speak without undue restrictions. Back in the days of walking a beat for 10 hour shifts or working a patrol district I knew every nook and cranny of every alley and every secluded area, maybe a good screen of trees, so I never had a problem finding a place to wiz. Places where the Sam Browne belt could come off and I could sit down for a moment of contemplation was a different matter. In business districts with convenience stores, gas stations, restaurants, etc, usually not a problem. I remember one patrol district that included a very large city park and golf course, and I was able to talk the Parks & Rec manager out of a key to the rest room facilities. All the cops had a key that opened a "report room" at each city fire station, and there was a rest room in each. On the old downtown foot beat (48 years ago now) I had keys to several of the businesses, which saved business owners from having to drive into town to reset a balky alarm system in the middle of the night (also handy when the temperatures dropped down below zero. When the economy tanked, late 1970's to mid 1980's, there were repossessed houses all over town, mostly VA and FHA foreclosures with a common key lock-box, and a local real estate broker hooked me up with a copy.

          More strategic than tactical, in my opinion.
          Oh yes

          As a rural deputy sheriff there were many places available...........................

          We carried keys to all of the rural fire stations and city halls in the small towns we patroled ......
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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          • #6
            Any good cop surveys his post for multiple places to take a break.

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            • #7
              The very first night shift I worked after attending the academy, my FTO spent a lot of the night showing me the places in town I could relieve myself. I still smile when I drive by one of those spots, even though it has been over 40 years.
              If your biggest work-related fear is getting a paper cut, don't try and tell a cop how to do his job.

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              • #8
                It could be a factor. I’ve directed traffic for hours at a serious crash.

                keep an empty water bottle handy
                "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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                • #9
                  I don't think it will be a problem, considering we are strictly talking about urinalysis?

                  1-3 hours should be plenty of time I think, most officers who drink energy shots and energy drinks during the shift probably have about a 3 hour limit as well. Not to mention, you could always ask for a relief from your post for a bathroom break, which is also not uncommon.
                  John 15:13 - Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.

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