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  • How long does a job termination affect you for?

    Im going to be reapplying with a agency beginning of next year. Till then, I am cleaning up my background to the best that I can, which paying credit card debt. But another issue I have is; I was terminated back in 2017 for something stupid and I regret doing. I pretty much got off work and while leaving work I backed up into company truck with my personal vehicle and didn't tell my supervisor about it. My supervisor said he could of pressed felony charges for It being a hit and run and damages being over a certain amount. but he just wanted his truck fixed. Pretty much, my insurance covered the damages. I feel like four years isn't enough time to separate myself from that incident. Should I try and apply next year or wait a year or two and apply in 2021-2022?

  • #2
    Your FTO will shred your reports,.....

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd put as much time between you and the Hit and Run as possible. That's going to be a tough one in your background.

      Comment


      • #4
        A hit and run with no injury probably isn't a felony, but in my state leaving the scene and failure to report will get your license suspended on points alone...

        The being fired part isn't that big of a deal, especially if it's only one, but the H&R part... you'll want a few years there.
        "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

        "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
          A hit and run with no injury probably isn't a felony, but in my state leaving the scene and failure to report will get your license suspended on points alone...

          The being fired part isn't that big of a deal, especially if it's only one, but the H&R part... you'll want a few years there.

          So I won't have a shot till 2023 minimum? Even though it already been three or four years?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Zeitgeist1 View Post
            I'd put as much time between you and the Hit and Run as possible. That's going to be a tough one in your background.
            How much time do you think would offset it?

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            • #7

              Three or four years would likely not be long enough for my agency to overlook something like this, and IMO you would not pass our background.

              From my perspective, it's a telling sign of what someone will do when given a choice between right and wrong. When evaluating applicants, we have to develop some confidence that the person we push through will do the right thing even when no one is looking. You were presented with an opportunity to do that...you made the wrong choice. And in your situation, the stakes were pretty low -- some restitution and maybe a ticked-off boss. The stakes can be a lot higher in police work.

              I feel your only chance is to get a lot more years between you and the incident, and work to build your resume up in other ways meanwhile (volunteer work, solid job performance, healthy home life, etc.). With that, you can make more of a case that you made a mistake, learned from it, and positvely changed. Even so, it'll depend on the agency and their threshhold for forgiving these types of incidents.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Blue_Stone View Post

                How much time do you think would offset it?
                5 to 7 yrs MINIMUM
                Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Blue_Stone View Post

                  How much time do you think would offset it?
                  Not just time, but an indication of a life changing event... finish your degree, a successful term of military service, something like that.

                  Not sure of your age, but if you were 16/17/18 when this happened and you’re now 28 with a successful employment history and clean nose since, maybe... coming of age does change people. If you were an adult when it happened...
                  "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                  "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Blue_Stone View Post

                    How much time do you think would offset it?
                    5-10yrs. This is not only a traffic offense, you caused damage and it goes to your sense of honesty/integrity.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All good replies above. However these replies assume that a thorough investigation will take place, and that is often not the case. Many police departments operated under a civil service system, frequently with a HR/Personnel office functioning as the screening authority, and background checks may be cursory measures such as sending correspondence to previous employers, etc.

                      Over the past 30-plus years many (perhaps most) employers have become very close-mouthed to any inquiries. Experienced HR personnel will frequently provide no more than a "yes/no" response (i.e.: applicant was employed in such-n-such position from this date to that date, and is-or-is-not eligible for rehire). Details of disciplinary problems are frequently withheld because of concerns over possible civil actions based on privacy laws. Without some effort to peel the onion very little information may be forthcoming. In the HR profession there seems to be an institutional fear of being the source for negative reporting (perhaps with good reason). Even the most basic processes, such as verifying the true identity of an applicant, is frequently neglected.

                      In more than one case I have seen employers provide good reports on individuals they really want to watch going away.

                      Experienced investigators will go to considerable lengths to maneuver around the brick walls. Personally, I always preferred speaking with direct supervisors and/or co-workers rather than the personnel director. I also made use of detailed credit histories (previous employment, residence addresses, etc) cross-referenced by city directories, identifying former landlords and neighbors for interview, and whenever possible I tried to obtain more than one source to corroborate my information. I found teachers and guidance counselors to be good sources in many cases. Rather than name my sources in my reports I preferred to refer to them as Source 1, Source 2, etc, maintaining a separate file of the actual investigative resources and results. Not perfect, but much more secure than the potential identification of individuals for harassment.

                      Short version: Not all background investigations are the same, and many are treated more as a clerical function than an investigative function. Less than diligent personnel (you may read "lazy" if you wish) may treat the process as nothing more than working down a checklist to clear their desks as easily as possible.

                      All of my experience in these matters dates from pre-Internet days, back when an investigation meant hours of research, obtaining public records, telephone time, shoe leather, and door-to-door canvassing when needed. In today's modern world there is probably more information available, and much more easily obtained. The proliferation of social media has opened many people to a level of scrutiny that never existed before. Outsourcing to research companies has become a routine tool, probably far more cost effective than the old fashioned methods.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        With my agency you most likely would get a "does not recommend" based on a few points:

                        1. the accident in and of itself isn't a huge deal, what is the issue is what happened afterwards. I'm assuming on the basis of your post that your boss found out about the accident from someone or something other than you (coworked, CCTV, etc) which causes issues when we look at someones integrity. This isn't shoplifting as a kid, this was within the last few years of (presumably) adulthood. Would you omit or lie to a supervisor now to save your butt?

                        2. you are up against folks without the baggage you possess with this history. While not a drug mule it is still a flag others don't carry. My agency still is very picky with who we hire and because of our rep we get a fair number of quality applicants each hiring cycle.

                        At a minimum, I'd say 5 years before a smaller less discriminating agency says "yea we'll take a chance."

                        What have you done since? Clean record? Any more issues at work reported or unreported?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          retired1995 makes a valid point in that some employers refuse to divulge anything other than dates of employment, and they prohibit employees from answering questions posed by outsiders. Also, as stated, not all departments operate the same way, and they have different tolerance levels. There is also a difference between a 16 year old banging up the company truck and pretending nothing happened, and a 28 year old doing the same thing. So, the answer to your question is, "it depends.'

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by careerchange#2 View Post
                            With my agency you most likely would get a "does not recommend" based on a few points:

                            1. the accident in and of itself isn't a huge deal, what is the issue is what happened afterwards. I'm assuming on the basis of your post that your boss found out about the accident from someone or something other than you (coworked, CCTV, etc) which causes issues when we look at someones integrity. This isn't shoplifting as a kid, this was within the last few years of (presumably) adulthood. Would you omit or lie to a supervisor now to save your butt?

                            2. you are up against folks without the baggage you possess with this history. While not a drug mule it is still a flag others don't carry. My agency still is very picky with who we hire and because of our rep we get a fair number of quality applicants each hiring cycle.

                            At a minimum, I'd say 5 years before a smaller less discriminating agency says "yea we'll take a chance."

                            What have you done since? Clean record? Any more issues at work reported or unreported?

                            Everyone made great feed back and comments. The only thing that really changed is I cleaned up my credit, had all my collections removed from my credit. After I was terminated I managed to get into corrections working for the state. I been working for department of corrections for three years now. No write ups, nothing unreported, etc.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by just joe View Post
                              retired1995 makes a valid point in that some employers refuse to divulge anything other than dates of employment, and they prohibit employees from answering questions posed by outsiders. Also, as stated, not all departments operate the same way, and they have different tolerance levels. There is also a difference between a 16 year old banging up the company truck and pretending nothing happened, and a 28 year old doing the same thing. So, the answer to your question is, "it depends.'
                              Yeah, this happened when I 21. I'm 24 now

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