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How can I become a police officer in USA as an immigrant with a green card?

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  • How can I become a police officer in USA as an immigrant with a green card?

    Hi there
    I'm a portuguese citizen who lives in the US and already has a green card , and I'd love to become a police officer in the US, I heard some states allow foreigners but I don't know about all of the states which do allow them, I'd like to know all the states who allow foreigners with green cards.
    I completed high school in Portugal (not sure if this can be a problem) , I'm pretty fit, can run fast and have a lot of strenght!
    So could I become a cop in the US? Do I have enough qualifications for it (high school diploma in Portugal) and do I fit the minimum requirements? And if not what do I have to do to become one? For example to become a cop in Chicago or Alaska. (I think those 2 states for example accept foreigners with green cards)

  • #2
    Some states allow it, others do not.

    My state requires citizenship
    Last edited by Iowa #1603; 10-09-2019, 07:11 PM.
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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    • #3
      As a permanent resident with green card you are eligible for most local and state law enforcement agencies. Many federal agencies will require citizenship. Your high school graduation will qualify you for many departments, but a few will require college degree for application.

      I see no reason why you should not pursue this career path. Many others have done so in the past.

      Best wishes.

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      • #4
        Thank you all, it's good to know I have a chance to become a cop here in US

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        • #5
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          • #6
            Just pick a department you think you will like, go to their website and see what they require. If you meet the minimum requirements apply. Then wait and see.

            I would also check out the organizations that certify law enforcement in those states and learn their minimum standards.

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            • #7
              If you are so inclined, you can generally get citizenship by joining the military. I've seen naturalization ceremonies done during boot camp graduations. Otherwise, it can be a massive paperwork headache and very expensive (still going through this with my wife just for a greencard).

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              • Exbpa340
                Exbpa340 commented
                Editing a comment
                Lawful Permanent Residents are eligible after 5 years of continual presence in the US (3 years if married to a US Citizen) to Naturalize. Joining the military (active duty) could fast track this.

                The Naturalization process is not over complicated. File the application (N400). Later you are printed and a name check is conducted. Then a softball interview with some very basic questions are asked. English requirements are almost none existent (and can be waived in certain cases). Finally there is a swearing in ceremony and are given a Certificate of Naturalization.

              • emtguy89
                emtguy89 commented
                Editing a comment
                Exbpa340, I believe the rule is one day of active duty time in lieu of the 5/3 years. I have an ex who went through it via military and it was fairly easy; while my wife has to go through the I-601 nightmare due to membership in a ruling totalitarian party (CPC). We've spent $3,000 so far. I also know someone whose British grandmother has been here since the 40s, married to military, and denied like five times.

              • Exbpa340
                Exbpa340 commented
                Editing a comment
                If you need a waiver for grounds of inadmissibility then this is not your normal cookie cutter visa/AOS application. CIS is not know for their overzealous application of the law to deny applicants. Quite the opposite. If it fits the agenda usually it’s rubber stamped (see DACA and U visa).

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