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  • Received Speeding Ticket at Start of Hiring Process

    I’m currently a reserve police officer and soon-to-be college graduate. I have just recently (this week) begun applying for law enforcement agencies in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

    On my way home from a ride along with an agency, I was stopped going 40 mph in a 30 mph zone. I was given a warning ticket.

    I have never been ticketed (be it warning or full ticket) in the past. Of course, I’ll have to add this to my personal history statement along with two other isolated incidents in my driving history (three years ago I hit a deer that jumped in front of me and I also “tapped” the rear bumper of a parked car—proper driver notification law was followed).

    Will this driving record significantly affect my chances of getting hired on full-time with an agency—particularly since I received a warning speeding ticket at the very start of my applications?

    Thank you very much.

  • #2
    I have only stopped cars at 10 over if it was a school zone or I looking for something else. I wouldn't sweat it. I would also recommend driving like an old lady until your BI is done.

    Comment


    • Aidokea
      Aidokea commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah, who stops cars that are only doing 10 over? My personal threshold is 20 mph over, unless it's in a school zone or something.

      And yes, the OP should drive EXTREMELY carefully, and not just until his BI is done- he should drive extremely carefully until he is off probation and has union protections.

      When I got hired, I didn't do ONE mph over the limit for about two years, until I was off probation and had union protections.

  • #3
    Originally posted by Chryslo View Post
    I’m currently a reserve police officer and soon-to-be college graduate. I have just recently (this week) begun applying for law enforcement agencies in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

    On my way home from a ride along with an agency, I was stopped going 40 mph in a 30 mph zone. I was given a warning ticket.

    I have never been ticketed (be it warning or full ticket) in the past. Of course, I’ll have to add this to my personal history statement along with two other isolated incidents in my driving history (three years ago I hit a deer that jumped in front of me and I also “tapped” the rear bumper of a parked car—proper driver notification law was followed).

    Will this driving record significantly affect my chances of getting hired on full-time with an agency—particularly since I received a warning speeding ticket at the very start of my applications?

    Thank you very much.
    If they automatically DQ you for that alone, you probably wouldn't have liked working there.


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    • #4
      Criminal scum

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Chryslo View Post
        I’m currently a reserve police officer and soon-to-be college graduate. I have just recently (this week) begun applying for law enforcement agencies in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

        On my way home from a ride along with an agency, I was stopped going 40 mph in a 30 mph zone. I was given a warning ticket.

        I have never been ticketed (be it warning or full ticket) in the past. Of course, I’ll have to add this to my personal history statement along with two other isolated incidents in my driving history (three years ago I hit a deer that jumped in front of me and I also “tapped” the rear bumper of a parked car—proper driver notification law was followed).

        Will this driving record significantly affect my chances of getting hired on full-time with an agency—particularly since I received a warning speeding ticket at the very start of my applications?

        Thank you very much.

        Comment


        • #6
          In Illinois a warning ticket is nothing more than a written warning. A warning ticket in Texas may cost you money and go on your driving record, I don't know, but here it doesn't. Fill out your apps, take your tests, and go to your interviews. if they ask you about it be honest and answer their questions about it. If, as westside popo commented, if they DQ you for that then you probably don't want to work there anyway.

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by westside popo View Post

            If they automatically DQ you for that alone, you probably wouldn't have liked working there.

            There are some State Police agencies that are pretty anal about traffic offenses
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • #8
              It's not a big deal if you have a otherwise good driving record. It's not a good idea to get cited when you want to be a police officer, but you shouldn't be DQ'd for it.
              Policebackground.net - Background investigation consulting & forums
              http://www.policebackground.net

              Comment


              • #9
                Reminds me of a story that I would probably think was funny, if it didn't involve me getting an actual citation (not a warning) while on duty and in uniform.

                I was commuting by motorcycle, I had court that morning, and I was short on time, so instead of stopping by the station to pick up a marked patrol car to drive to court, I just rode my personal motorcycle directly to court. I parked it legally, but our parking enforcement officer, who apparently didn't recognize my personal motorcycle as being mine, didn't like how I had my license plate mounted, so he cited it.

                The license plate mounting was something that I had done- I was an expert-licensed motorcycle road racer and road racing instructor, and I used this particular motorcycle when I was instructing, so some aspects of the motorcycle had been "simplified" to facilitate it's dual purpose use. The manner in which I had mounted the license plate left it completely visible and legible from the rear, but it was similar to the manner in which some offenders mount their license plates with the intent of making them not legible, so he cited it.

                I cornered the other officer at the station later to discuss it. He apologized, stating that he didn't realize it was my motorcycle, and he said that if he had known that it was mine, that he would have just talked to me about the license plate mounting instead of citing it. That said, he didn't offer to take the citation back, I didn't ask him to, and we both respected each other and remained friendly afterwards.

                I took a photo of the license plate as mounted, then remounted it to be more to the likings of the officer that cited it, took another photo, and included both photos along with a check for the bail amount along with my letter to the judge, explaining that I was there testifying in my official capacity as a police officer on behalf of the state that morning in a criminal matter, without denying the offense. The judge dismissed it and sent me my check back.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Not a big deal, but do declare it. Granted, unless the agency that wrote you the warning is the same one that you are trying to hire on with, that warning is not recorded anywhere. But the best course of action is to declare it, plus they might want to contact that agency and look at the dash cam to see how you interacted with the officer.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I don't see the point in being pulled over for only 10 over the limit, unless the officer was hardcore (in which case they would have ticketed you) especially if this was the only reason for being pulled over.

                    IMO, and I think this goes for most people, you have nothing to be worried over. EVERYONE goes above the speed limit several times a day (5-10 MPH over).
                    John 15:13 - Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I received a speeding ticket while I was in the reserve academy. I disclosed it to my department, and of course in future backgrounds, and was hired without difficulty. You should be fine.
                      "Respect is earned. Honesty is appreciated. Trust is gained. Loyalty is returned."

                      Comment

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