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  • Termination during background investigation

    Alright guys. I’ve gotten myself into quite the predicament and I’m uncertain what to do. This past week I was terminated from my job as a manager at Chick-fil-a. It was very out of the blue for me. The reason I was given was that the owner felt that I was no longer a good fit with the team and that it was time for both myself and the restaurant to move on. I haven’t had any issues with anyone lately, and the only issue I’ve ever had was a minor misunderstanding with a fellow manager 3 months back. Basically she didn’t like how I ran a shift and approached me about it. I listened carefully, took notes, and looked at it as an opportunity to improve. This all has happened in the middle of the background investigation process and I’m worried it may affect my chances to advance. I immediately talked to my BI and informed her of what happened and what the reasons were. My question is, do I still have a shot at advancing through the process even with this on my record? Other than this I’ve never had any tickets, run-ins, drug history, employment issues, or anything. I also speak fluent Spanish and have a concealed carry license and lots of security experience. What do you guys think? What can I do to make it better?

  • #2
    Originally posted by AA30919 View Post
    Alright guys. I’ve gotten myself into quite the predicament and I’m uncertain what to do. This past week I was terminated from my job as a manager at Chick-fil-a. It was very out of the blue for me. The reason I was given was that the owner felt that I was no longer a good fit with the team and that it was time for both myself and the restaurant to move on. I haven’t had any issues with anyone lately, and the only issue I’ve ever had was a minor misunderstanding with a fellow manager 3 months back. Basically she didn’t like how I ran a shift and approached me about it. I listened carefully, took notes, and looked at it as an opportunity to improve. This all has happened in the middle of the background investigation process and I’m worried it may affect my chances to advance. I immediately talked to my BI and informed her of what happened and what the reasons were. My question is, do I still have a shot at advancing through the process even with this on my record? Other than this I’ve never had any tickets, run-ins, drug history, employment issues, or anything. I also speak fluent Spanish and have a concealed carry license and lots of security experience. What do you guys think? What can I do to make it better?
    A concealed carry license and lots of security experience mean nothing.

    Fluent Spanish is a real bonus.

    Regarding your termination, you're going to have to give us a LOT more details, before we're going to be able to address that issue- your nebulous description of your termination doesn't really communicate much to us.

    Comment


    • AA30919
      AA30919 commented
      Editing a comment
      So basically I was just pulled in after a shift and told that I was being let go. The only reasons I was given were that I was no longer a good fit at the restaurant and that it was time for us to move on. We did just open a second restaurant and haven’t made a profit in a while, so my only speculation is that it may be a budget cut, as 4 other employees were fired on the same day. The issue I mentioned is the only I’ve had there in 3 years. The fellow manager didn’t like that I put her in a position with less contact with guests, as she liked talking with them more and thought she was better than those I had in those positions with more contact. After a brief conversation where she explained this, I noted it down and tried to focus on putting my best people in contact with guests more. What other info do you need? I’m an open book and am more than happy to share. Thank you for your willingness to help, I appreciate it.

  • #3
    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

    A concealed carry license and lots of security experience mean nothing.

    Fluent Spanish is a real bonus.

    Regarding your termination, you're going to have to give us a LOT more details, before we're going to be able to address that issue- your nebulous description of your termination doesn't really communicate much to us.
    Agreed.

    Don't think your B.I. won't be going there to find out exactly what transpired. If it was in "the best interests" of all parties (Chickfila and you), generally a resignation will be accepted and both can move on, not a termination.

    Need more info, but that's up to you.
    John 15:13 - Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.

    Comment


    • AA30919
      AA30919 commented
      Editing a comment
      What other info do you need? I’m more than happy to provide any and all details. Thank you for your help!

  • #4
    Originally posted by AA30919 View Post
    Alright guys. I’ve gotten myself into quite the predicament and I’m uncertain what to do. This past week I was terminated from my job as a manager at Chick-fil-a. It was very out of the blue for me. The reason I was given was that the owner felt that I was no longer a good fit with the team and that it was time for both myself and the restaurant to move on. I haven’t had any issues with anyone lately, and the only issue I’ve ever had was a minor misunderstanding with a fellow manager 3 months back. Basically she didn’t like how I ran a shift and approached me about it. I listened carefully, took notes, and looked at it as an opportunity to improve. This all has happened in the middle of the background investigation process and I’m worried it may affect my chances to advance. I immediately talked to my BI and informed her of what happened and what the reasons were. My question is, do I still have a shot at advancing through the process even with this on my record? Other than this I’ve never had any tickets, run-ins, drug history, employment issues, or anything. I also speak fluent Spanish and have a concealed carry license and lots of security experience. What do you guys think? What can I do to make it better?
    I see nothing that will affect your chances for a LEO job as long as you let your BI know about the termination and the reasons you were given.

    Bosses get fired by their boss's all the time over somewhat trivial matters
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

    Comment


    • AA30919
      AA30919 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for your help! I appreciate it!

  • #5
    You were employed as a restaurant manager. I'm sure the position was one "at the will and pleasure" of the employer. Termination requires no explanation or reason given. I doubt that Chick-Fil-A will say anything to your BI other than to confirm that you were employed there from DATE A to DATE B, that you are no longer employed there, and whether or not you are subject to re-employment. Knowledgeable employers and HR executives simply will not discuss anything else because of the potential for civil liability claims.

    When I did background investigations I sent out a written form to the company that invited comments, but hardly ever received anything back (in fact, about half the time they wouldn't even respond to the inquiry). I also looked for co-workers and immediate supervisors, usually learning a lot more than any HR manager would ever release.

    I wouldn't worry overly much about this incident. Stuff like this happens all the time, nothing unusual at all.

    Comment


    • AA30919
      AA30919 commented
      Editing a comment
      Awesome feedback and I really appreciate it! Thanks!

  • #6
    Maybe they found out you are trying to be a cop and wanted to replace you sooner rather than later. Just my .02

    Comment


    • AA30919
      AA30919 commented
      Editing a comment
      I have thought that’s a possibility as well. Apparently they told my BI that it was a budget issue and nothing personal

  • #7
    Five employees terminated the same day? Yeah, I doubt it's anything you (or the others) did wrong. Basically layoffs to reduce expenses and increase profits. It can happen to even the best of employees.

    I wouldn't be too concerned about it if I did your background...unless my investigation revealed that there was a lot more to the story than what you shared.

    Dust yourself off, don't stress, continue with the application process...and if you're not selected this time around, don't be discouraged. Good luck!

    Comment


    • #8
      Originally posted by NC Marine View Post
      Don't think your B.I. won't be going there to find out exactly what transpired. If it was in "the best interests" of all parties (Chickfila and you), generally a resignation will be accepted and both can move on, not a termination.
      I wouldn't read too much into that. If he voluntarily resigned, he would not be eligible for unemployment benefits. He's far better off being terminated (as long as it is not for gross misconduct).

      Comment


      • #9
        Now that you're gone, can you tell us how they get their chicken meat so doggone tender?
        Convictions, in the end, they can be dangerous. But a world without them is just kind of an awful, gray, amorphous mass.

        -Bono

        Comment


        • AA30919
          AA30919 commented
          Editing a comment
          Actually yes! They use pressure cookers to fry chicken instead of open fryers (like a lot of restaurants) this allows higher volume because the cook time is much quicker, and more tenderness because the moisture gets locked in quicker.

        • Radio Raheem
          Radio Raheem commented
          Editing a comment
          AA30919 Uh-Oh...no clearance for you. You just leaked classified information! LOL

      • #10
        Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
        Now that you're gone, can you tell us how they get their chicken meat so doggone tender?
        It doesn't work that way

        I worked for KFC in college.......................never found out what the 13 herbs and spices were. They came from the company in a mix.
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • #11
          But seriously- I'd be more concerned about the CPL. People get fired from Chick-fil-a and Burger King and other McJobs all the time and everyone knows when you pay someone minimum wage, you get minimum effort in return. I've worked a couple of bottom barrel jobs back in the day and management did whatever they wanted- there was no HR, no union, no nothing except a weak paycheck every two weeks and a jerk-off boss always looking to crap on an employee for not giving 110% for a job that paid peanuts. It's not like you were terminated from the Naval Academy here....


          The CPL would warrant more explanation in my neck of the woods. Lots of people have them, but not always for reasons as pure as the driven snow....
          Convictions, in the end, they can be dangerous. But a world without them is just kind of an awful, gray, amorphous mass.

          -Bono

          Comment


          • AA30919
            AA30919 commented
            Editing a comment
            Yeah the CPL was required by one of my previous employers in the security industry. I almost never carry anymore though

        • #12
          Originally posted by retired1995 View Post
          I doubt that Chick-Fil-A will say anything to your BI other than to confirm that you were employed there from DATE A to DATE B, that you are no longer employed there, and whether or not you are subject to re-employment. Knowledgeable employers and HR executives simply will not discuss anything else because of the potential for civil liability claims.
          Yes, but we also stress to the previous employer that the applicant is pursuing a position of public trust, that it's important that we know as much as we can in order to make an accurate recommendation, and encourage them to speak freely with the promise them that we will NEVER reveal what they say about the applicant.

          I also looked for co-workers and immediate supervisors, usually learning a lot more than any HR manager would ever release.
          This too.

          Comment


          • #13
            Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

            Yes, but we also stress to the previous employer that the applicant is pursuing a position of public trust, that it's important that we know as much as we can in order to make an accurate recommendation, and encourage them to speak freely with the promise them that we will NEVER reveal what they say about the applicant.
            True but MOST private companies could care less and around my area won't violate THEIR policies for fear of getting sued. The signed release is as good as toilet paper as far as most corporate legal beagles are concerned.


            Co workers.......................that is a whole nother story
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • Aidokea
              Aidokea commented
              Editing a comment
              Emphasis on the word "most"- most of them won't violate their own policies.

              But some will, if we promise that we will never reveal what they said.

          • #14
            I always find interesting when a candidate says they were fired out of the blue. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but there's usually a back story to it. If the company uses The Work Number (like Chick Fil A does) to verify employment, it's likely your BI won't get any relevant information from them. Some states like California have labor laws that allow current and former employees to review their personnel files to see what's in them. You can see if that's available in your state. There may also be more information you're not aware of if the BI is able to get an interview with your manager. There are a lot of what ifs here. The bottom line is you may be unable to prove anything other than you were fired and that's based on your own statements. If that's the case the only thing any agency has to go on is that you were terminated. Many agencies will require you to show at least 6 months to one year of good employment in order to erase your last adverse employment. It has nothing to do with how great you are otherwise if you have an employment black mark.
            Policebackground.net - Background investigation consulting & forums
            http://www.policebackground.net

            Comment


            • Aidokea
              Aidokea commented
              Editing a comment
              I think that's rather generous, especially since we're now hiring people that are expected to work for 30 years before retiring. Asking for six months to one year of good employment, is nothing.

            • LA_Backgrounds
              LA_Backgrounds commented
              Editing a comment
              One year of continuous good employment is the minimum in Los Angeles. I'm just giving the range I've seen from So Cal agencies over the years. I only report the news, I don't make it.

            • Radio Raheem
              Radio Raheem commented
              Editing a comment
              Sometimes companies do fire you out of the blue. Especially private companies in "right to work" states. It happens more than you think.

          • #15
            You don't have anything to worry about regarding your termination. I too was fired during my background investigation. I told the investigator and he disclosed that he was also fired during his background investigation. I've been in the FEDs since 2007. I've worked for three agencies and my termination hasn't stopped me from being hired.
            OUT!!

            Comment

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