Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Experienced Canadian police officer moving to the US. Options in LE?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Experienced Canadian police officer moving to the US. Options in LE?

    Greetings,

    This topic has been discussed before; however, there seemingly has been some changes in policy and law regarding certain law enforcement agencies’ ability to hire non-US citizens.

    I’m a serving Canadian police officer looking to move down to the US with my wife, and I’d like to continue a career in law enforcement.

    I thought I’d reach out to the community to get some feedback on what my potential law enforcement career options may be, especially in the state of California of which I intend on moving to.

    I am a late 30s male Canadian citizen, with 17 years of policing service experience.

    I’ve worked in uniformed municipal policing and have over a decade of federal policing experience with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

    I’m currently a supervisor and federal investigator with extensive experience in transnational organized crime, national security, commercial crime etc.

    I’ve worked extensively with the DEA, FBI, DHS, HSI, INTERPOL etc. and have served on several international policing missions with the UN and NATO.

    Once moved down to the US, I would like to either continue in policing which seems impossible at the moment due to US residency requirements, or work in a similar field either in the public or private sector.

    I’m also willing to work within a civilian position or as part of admin/support staff within a law enforcement agency.

    I also possess a BA and a Master’s degree in business management.

    I know I’d be great value added to any law enforcement agency and any feedback regarding what my options may be would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    Federal LE is out of the question due to age (not to mention immigration status).

    You're too old for California Highway Patrol as well.

    Not too old for LAPD though. Just need to be a legal alien permanent resident who has applied for citizenship.

    http://per.lacity.org/joinlapd/recru...qualifications

    Same for LASD.

    https://careers.lasd.org/frequently-asked-questions/


    BUT: instead of leaving Canada and starting completely new in a foreign country where the laws are different and the courts do things way differently, why not try persuading RCMP into assigning you as an agency rep on a transnational crime task force located in California?


    Chance favors the prepared mind.

    -Louis Pasteur

    Comment


    • #3
      I’m a cop in California. California requires all applicants to have applied for and accepted for citizenship before you can be hired. If you don’t have a way to obtain US citizenship quickly it would be a rather lengthy and frankly pointless endeavour as your experience as a Canadian law enforcement officer would not be accepted. You would still have to do academy all over again.

      I know there are other states that only require green cards and it may be beneficial for you to research those specific states.

      In in all honesty though, I would stay in Canada if I were you.

      With the the exception of California, New York and Washington state, Canadian police agencies will pay you much more than places down south.

      Comment


      • #4
        Under what visa are you relocating to the US? Provided that you are entering as an Lawful Permanent Resident I am sure that some agencies/departments would hire you. Due to age and citizenship I don’t see any way that you get on board with a federal agency. The majority of federal agencies have a cutoff of 37 (a few have 40 as the cutoff) but you’d need to be a citizen to apply and meet the age requirement. Assuming that you enter as a LPR it would take at a minimum 3 years to Naturalize (if married to a US Citizen) and in most cases 5 years to Naturalize.



        “Right now I'm having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.” - Steven Wright

        US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
        DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

        Comment


        • #5
          A number of my co-workers are foreign nationals.

          But everyone has to do the full academy, FTO, and probation.

          Comment


          • #6
            You sure you want to jump in the fray down here? Canada averages 250 gun homicides a year.... for the entire country. That's about average for a single big U.S. city. 40,000 gun homicides nationally per year... It's not South Africa level violence but pretty close...

            Say the stars magically align and you got hired by a city or county. You wouldn't be an investigator, not for awhile. Most likely you would be pushing a cruiser or working in a jail. Those are whole 'nother worlds from the investigator life of 9-5, M-F, khaki pants and polo shirts, sitting in front of a computer screen...

            What about selling real estate? Or cars? Or put that MBA to use and get a cushy corporate job?

            Chance favors the prepared mind.

            -Louis Pasteur

            Comment


            • #7
              How would you be entering the country? Immigrant or non-immigrant?
              “Right now I'm having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.” - Steven Wright

              US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
              DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DaveBB View Post
                Greetings,

                This topic has been discussed before; however, there seemingly has been some changes in policy and law regarding certain law enforcement agencies’ ability to hire non-US citizens.
                In the US states set their own standards for state and lower level police agencies. California's are somewhat strict, Colorado's are somewhat more lax.

                In Colorado for example there are almost NO state standards... most things are set by individual departments.

                Many agencies in Colorado have hired non-citizens for years, the Colorado State Patrol being one. A green card is all you need.

                As mentioned you're too old for any US federal agencies that offer a law enforcement retirement. You have to be able to reach a 20 year retirement by age 57, which means hiring by age 37. Some agencies are so desperate for people they've raised the age to 40 (retire at 60). There are some few exceptions but none would likely apply to you... and there's still the citizenship thing.

                As mentioned, you would have to attend an academy again (I don't think any state accepts foreign police academy credentials) and you'd be at the bottom of the totem pole in any department you started with... at best in a patrol job, at worst working in a detention center for years until you get a shot at the road.

                Most states have some kind of investigative agency like Colorado's "Colorado Bureau of Investigation" that you could try... you'd still have to attend another academy. There are also usually limited-jurisdiction agencies in a state: Alcohol & tobacco, gaming, marijuana... That's probably your best bet to land a similar job to what you're doing now.
                Last edited by tanksoldier; 07-14-2019, 01:17 PM.
                "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                Comment


                • #9
                  Your age is going to put you out of the running for most if not all civil service positions. I worked for a state university many years ago and worked with a foreign national, so there are jobs out there, you will just have to find them. What is your visa status going to be? Is it safe to assume that you don't want to make a career out of the foreign service contracts?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Any reason why you haven’t answered the question on how you plan on entering the US (immigrant vs non-immigrant) in spite of the question being asked three times (twice by me)?

                    Not exactly sensitive information unless you plan to enter as a non-immigrant and overstaying/work out of status.
                    Last edited by Exbpa340; 07-17-2019, 11:57 PM.
                    “Right now I'm having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.” - Steven Wright

                    US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
                    DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

                    Comment


                    • DaveBB
                      DaveBB commented
                      Editing a comment
                      My apologies. Please see my comment below.

                  • #11
                    Moving to California? Do you know where?

                    I would wager you could hired if your immigration status is labeled correctly. You will need to complete the Academy and whatever training program your prospective agency has.
                    If you live on the west coast of Canada, largely it’s the same here (especially the Bay Area).

                    semper destravit

                    Comment


                    • DaveBB
                      DaveBB commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Agreed. No I'd stay away from san fran and bay area. Not a fan of the weather. Looking further south for the warmer climate

                    • RGDS
                      RGDS commented
                      Editing a comment
                      So you want a hot climate? SF gets way less rain than Vancouver. Do you even get fog there?

                      SFPD is paying something like $170,000 a year.

                  • #12
                    Originally posted by RGDS View Post
                    Moving to California? Do you know where?

                    I would wager you could hired if your immigration status is labeled correctly. You will need to complete the Academy and whatever training program your prospective agency has.
                    If you live on the west coast of Canada, largely it’s the same here (especially the Bay Area).
                    Canadians can enter the US under the visa waiver program without a visa. They are admitted as a visitor (non-immigrant) for up to 90 days. Many/some overstay and work out of status. His refusal to answer/address this question makes me suspect that he may intend to enter as a non-immigrant and might not be eligible to legally work in the US. Maybe he has everything squared away to be admitted as an immigrant but at this point it is doubtful.
                    “Right now I'm having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.” - Steven Wright

                    US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
                    DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

                    Comment


                    • RGDS
                      RGDS commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I agree the lack of answers is suspicious. I doubt
                      that this poster is even real. Bots and trolls are a problem on this page.

                  • #13
                    My apologies for disappearing. I was away dealing with a family matter for the last couple of months and didn't have time nor was in the mood for much else.

                    Thank you all for the replies. As mentioned, Canadians can enter the US and stay for 90 days. During that period, it's possible to look for an employer to hire and sponsor eligible candidates through a H1B viisa.

                    But I concur with the replies that LE is likely out of the question due to the mentioned reasons.

                    Canadians have various options to work in the US under various visas and agreements such as NAFTA.

                    Many Canadians also just head down to wait out the Canadian winter. That's my main objective while making it a secondary goal to seek potential career options if I like the lifestyle enough.

                    Once again, thank you for the responses..

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      NY requires you to be a US citizen and NY resident to be appointed as a police officer. Our winters suck though so it’s not any better. LOL!

                      17 years is a long time to throw away. Please tell me you’re going to hit 20 and retire or something to that effect?
                      I make my living on Irish welfare.

                      Comment

                      MR300x250 Tablet

                      Collapse

                      What's Going On

                      Collapse

                      There are currently 7316 users online. 187 members and 7129 guests.

                      Most users ever online was 26,947 at 08:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                      Welcome Ad

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X