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  • #16
    In and of itself the polygraph cannot detect lies. It detects physiological responses to questions. Hesitation, over thinking the questions, any number of things can be detected as a response. They're trying to make the candidate nervous and reveal more. I've failed a few myself for reasons you already said; one time, they said I'd committed a major undetected crime, and another that I'd committed theft. I also had a bad tendency to over think things in my early application days.

    The other kicker, in an attempt to elicit a confession, is the operator may lie and tell you that you're triggering a response when you weren't. Then they try to run it in circles to gain confessions.

    ​​​​​​

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    • #17
      Nothing is perfect, especially things that are designed, created, and used by humans.

      Good polygraphers are very highly trained, experienced, and intelligent people. Not all polygraphers are good. Just like the guy doing quality control on a manufacturing assembly line, some know that today's workload is X-number and they are expected to reject a certain percentage. Short version: normal human behavior (short-sighted, self-focused, lazy at times, etc).

      Good polygraph machines are very highly developed tools that, if properly maintained and carefully operated, are capable of a high level of performance. Not all polygraph machines are equal, not all are properly maintained, not all are carefully operated.

      A good polygraph examination suite is carefully designed and maintained to provide an atmosphere completely free of any potential distractions. Not all are up to such standards.

      I have seen polygraph exams administered by people who have never completed a polygraph examiner's training program or certification. I have seen polygraph equipment bought and sold in various states of used condition, and there is always a market for bargains. I have seen polygraph exams administered in office environments with pictures, photographs, open windows, background noise, traffic noise, and just about any other type of distraction that can be imagined.

      What recourse does one have? None at all. You applied for employment with satisfactory completion of a polygraph exam as a condition of employment. You were not offered employment, thus you have lost nothing (unless you want to count your hurt feelings or frustration).

      Polygraphy remains a valuable investigative tool. It is not a substitute for investigation, but is frequently relied upon in that capacity in order to expedite hiring procedures and keep expenses to a minimum.

      That is the reality.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by retired1995 View Post
        Nothing is perfect, especially things that are designed, created, and used by humans.

        Good polygraphers are very highly trained, experienced, and intelligent people. Not all polygraphers are good. Just like the guy doing quality control on a manufacturing assembly line, some know that today's workload is X-number and they are expected to reject a certain percentage. Short version: normal human behavior (short-sighted, self-focused, lazy at times, etc).

        Good polygraph machines are very highly developed tools that, if properly maintained and carefully operated, are capable of a high level of performance. Not all polygraph machines are equal, not all are properly maintained, not all are carefully operated.

        A good polygraph examination suite is carefully designed and maintained to provide an atmosphere completely free of any potential distractions. Not all are up to such standards.

        I have seen polygraph exams administered by people who have never completed a polygraph examiner's training program or certification. I have seen polygraph equipment bought and sold in various states of used condition, and there is always a market for bargains. I have seen polygraph exams administered in office environments with pictures, photographs, open windows, background noise, traffic noise, and just about any other type of distraction that can be imagined.

        What recourse does one have? None at all. You applied for employment with satisfactory completion of a polygraph exam as a condition of employment. You were not offered employment, thus you have lost nothing (unless you want to count your hurt feelings or frustration).

        Polygraphy remains a valuable investigative tool. It is not a substitute for investigation, but is frequently relied upon in that capacity in order to expedite hiring procedures and keep expenses to a minimum.

        That is the reality.
        exactly
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Sig0x View Post
          My first ever polygraph, several years ago, I passed with no problem and went on to receive an offer for employment.

          I ended up resigning to take a different job and recently, I am looking to get into the field again. I have been started through the background process with two new departments. These departments both use the same polygraph examiner, someone different than who tested me the first time. So my second ever polygraph, with this new examiner, detected "deception" for one question. The question was if I was in a street gang, and apparently since one of my prior jobs was working at a prison, this department didn't like the sound of that and ended up passing on me. Only problem is - I am obviously not or ever have been in a street gang, or involved in anything shady while working at the prison. I have NO CLUE why this flagged as deceptive.

          I just completed my third poly at this same place, for a third department, and the examiner once again detected something! This time on two questions...the street gang question was fine this time (as it should be), but now apparently I showed something for "have you ever stolen from your employer" and "have you ever done drugs."
          You want to be ballsy (and risk puting it all on the line?)

          Find out who is the head of the background unit and make an appointment to meet with him.

          Tell them you have taken three differen polys with the same company - the first said you were clean, the second said you belonged to a gang, the third said you didn't belong to a gang but that you used drugs and stole and his agency used that as a basis for DQ.

          Point out that Polys 2 & 3 impeached their own credibility with respect ti gang membership, making the finding of of Poly 3 regarding drug use questionable. Suggest he not rely on "junk science" and instead fall back on good old fashion po9lice work. Rather than DQ you, challenge him to assign a BI to look into the theft and drug issue. Offer blood and hair samples for testing. Offer to answer any other questions regarding theft. The worst that can happen is he says no. Well, I take that back. The worst that can happen is he takes you up on it and the BI really does dig up dirt on you.






          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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