Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

LEO's...I'm looking for things to add to the resume...

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LEO's...I'm looking for things to add to the resume...

    I've been applying to different agencies in CT for a little over a year now..since my senior year in college.

    I'm now graduated and have applied to 8 agencies total now. Tests have come and gone. I've passed some and failed some. I've taken polygraphs, passed one, didn't receive the results from another one, and I'm waiting for results from a current one. I've been let out of the process after two polygraphs but before the full BI began.

    I know this is a long process, but I won't stop applying until I'm hired. The job hunt to become a police officer is the hardest thing I've ever had to do; i'm impressed with myself and that i'm still hanging in there.

    My resume as is, is nothing great. I have a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (123 credits), 2 x 120 hour internships with a local pd and CT State Police. I'm moderately fluent in spanish, I have a certificate for NRA Basic Pistol Course (for whatever that is worth) 3.02 GPA in major, 2.89 total gpa (which is a still a B- but it looks sub-standard in its number form)

    What else should I be doing aside from just applying?

    Some of my ideas: get CPR certified, volunteer work at a soup kitchen, do more ride-alongs.

    Do Police Departments especially like these sorts of activities?

    Would getting a CCW (pistol permit) and then showing responsibility with that be advised? Because it's asked on most personal history reports if you have a Weapons Permit, and if so has it been revoked, etc etc.

    I just indicate "I will be applying for one ASAP or in the near future"


    -----

    This is the first time i've actually asked the forum for some help, so thanks.

    I'm actually working an hourly job right now, despite having a college degree, and I sort of feel bummed out/ashamed of this, but I know it's temporary and it's a stepping stone. I've been promoted to sort of a supervisory position in a rather short amount of time (5 months) I work my butt off and go above and beyond most of the other employees and I wish this will reflect on impressions made towards prospective departments...especially that whole promotion thing.

  • #2
    Resume

    Your post indicates a couple of DQs from the hiring process. I can't really address these issues as I don't know what prompted them. Your internships and ride alongs look okay, so I don't see a problem there. Volunteer work can look good on an application, especially if it involves some public contact. Now to what I would not advise. Unless you need it for a job, I would not suggest you apply for, or obtain a Concealed Weapons Permit. As a Background Investigator, I'd have some pretty serious questions concerning your need to carry a concealed firearm. Don't misunderstand me. You can own all the firearms you want. I'm a member of the NRA, and fully support the shooting and firearms safety programs they offer. That said, most police firearms instructors I know, prefer a recruit officer come to the range with no bad habits to "unlearn".

    Comment


    • #3
      thank you, and I use the term resume meaning application. (most agencies i've applied to have not required a resume and even say not to include one.

      in terms of the CCW...in CT, if you want to purchase your own weapons, or go shooting, you need that CCW/Permit. Carrying on your person is of course, your choice.
      Last edited by BAC0311; 04-23-2007, 06:22 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Your resume is actually pretty good. You have an education, you have some knowledge of a second language and I assume you have a clean record. I do agree with PhilipCal, you don't need a CCW permit and I wouldn't suggest getting it for a part of a resume. Ride alongs are good, but don't over do it.

        Just hang in there, from what you have written you look good so far and sometimes it does take some time

        Good Luck

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by McPhenius
          Your resume is actually pretty good. You have an education, you have some knowledge of a second language and I assume you have a clean record. I do agree with PhilipCal, you don't need a CCW permit and I wouldn't suggest getting it for a part of a resume. Ride alongs are good, but don't over do it.

          Just hang in there, from what you have written you look good so far and sometimes it does take some time

          Good Luck
          thank you for your input, my record is clean, however I'm not an "angel." I've made mistakes in the past...but they are minor and in the past. And talking to some Background Investigators, none of them said any of these past things were DQ'ing.

          I feel that I was let go simply because someone had more to offer that I could.

          I'm only 23, and I understand I still have some learning to do. I would just like to be an officer soon. I'm going to be great, I just need to be given the opportunity to do so.
          Last edited by BAC0311; 04-23-2007, 10:17 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BAC0311
            I'm going to be great, I just need to be given the opportunity to do so.
            How about adding modesty to your resume

            Good luck
            "Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought" ~Henri Louis Bergson
            ______________________


            ComptonPOLICEGANGS.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PhilipCal
              I would not suggest you apply for, or obtain a Concealed Weapons Permit.
              Why is that...?

              Originally posted by PhilipCal
              As a Background Investigator, I'd have some pretty serious questions concerning your need to carry a concealed firearm.
              I did backgrounds as well for two different agencies....and never brought up CCW issues......unless you did it illegally....

              I might have issues if the guy/gal has a ton of weapons......more so than most normal folks. If he's a collector, that's great.....but I would still be more curious about that than a CCW....

              Originally posted by PhilipCal
              That said, most police firearms instructors I know, prefer a recruit officer come to the range with no bad habits to "unlearn".
              Didn't think that was our job as BI's to determine stuff like that.....thought our job was to clear them to get employed by an agency.....

              Not trying to be snippy....just curious as what folks from elsewhere in the US think.....


              -------------------
              Back on topic.....try getting with your local civic organizations like the Lions, Elks, etc....and join them....and actually participate in their community activities. Food Kitchen would be good. Also check with local charities to see if they need assistance.....

              I would work on your Spanish skills....and perhaps try to learn something else that might be needed in your area.

              Go back and work on your masters if you can afford it. If you can't, see if you can take more classes in different areas to expand stuff you didn't get in your undergrad....
              Last edited by Bearcat357; 04-23-2007, 11:39 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bearcat357

                -------------------
                Back on topic.....try getting with your local civic organizations like the Lions, Elks, etc....and join them....and actually participate in their community activities. Food Kitchen would be good. Also check with local charities to see if they need assistance.....

                I would work on your Spanish skills....and perhaps try to learn something else that might be needed in your area.

                Go back and work on your masters if you can afford it. If you can't, see if you can take more classes in different areas to expand stuff you didn't get in your undergrad....
                Oh, you just reminded me. I was in the Spanish Honors Society in High School, which I think is still noteworthy.

                And will do on the Lions club. My best friend's dad is a member of the Lions and United Way, so I can ask him what I can do to start some of these volunteer activities and even see if I can join.

                Thanks

                Comment


                • #9
                  Again, with the CCW. That is the permit you need in CT to purchase pistols and long rifles (if i recall correctly for rifles, but Def. for pistols) and then to carry concealed if you choose to do so. My dad has his permit, so it would be more of a father/son hobby to go shooting, which in my mind outweighs the whole personal protection/home protection aspect of having CCW.

                  I'm not that focused on getting one, I took the basic course last June...so its going to expire soon anyways.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BAC0311
                    And will do on the Lions club. My best friend's dad is a member of the Lions and United Way, so I can ask him what I can do to start some of these volunteer activities and even see if I can join.
                    All I ask is please be active and commited to whatever you join.

                    I belong to a service club (one that I mentioned in my first post) and it ****es me off when folks join (usually when they are going to run for office and want to toss that on their resume) and don't do a damn thing afterwards.....

                    I was/am able to be active in it even as a LEO. My time is limited....but if they need help doing something and I can get there to help....I will....

                    I have been with mine for 13 years......

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bearcat357
                      All I ask is please be active and commited to whatever you join.

                      I belong to a service club (one that I mentioned in my first post) and it ****es me off when folks join (usually when they are going to run for office and want to toss that on their resume) and don't do a damn thing afterwards.....

                      I was/am able to be active in it even as a LEO. My time is limited....but if they need help doing something and I can get there to help....I will....

                      I have been with mine for 13 years......
                      I will take that advice. And I like the quote you have.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BAC0311
                        I will take that advice. And I like the quote you have.
                        That's all I ask as being a member of a service club....as a lot are low on members and need all the help they can get when it comes to projects....

                        We do book bags for kids before school starts, Thanksgiving and X-Mas baskets, Give money to LE to take kids shopping for X-Mas, do clothing/money/basic needs after house fires, etc.....


                        I wish the Author of my quote would run for National Office....but that's just me....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You can look good on paper but that doesn't mean you fit the character they're looking for. Be up front and 100% honest about everything. So what if you smoked a few joints back in high school. Or maybe you had a DUI 5 or 6 years ago. Just let them know before they find out on your background investigation. Most departments are not looking for angels. We are looking for ethical and honest people.
                          -Stay safe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had an Oral Interview today for 7 departments. It went......... VERY WELL in my opinion. I just had an overall good feeling. a Couple tricky questions but I just sat back, thought for a second and tried to make the best sense of them. I was asked if I had any questions to please feel free to contact the administration, etc. (the way the worded it, almost made me feel received an excellent score and that I was liked by the oral board)

                            I dunno about you guys and gals, but when you walk out of the interviewing and just can't hold back a big smile, it probably felt like a good interview
                            Last edited by BAC0311; 04-25-2007, 03:29 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I had a very similar question a while back and L-1 had an exceptional answer

                              http://forums.officer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=61581

                              Originally Posted by Gyromite
                              I'd like to know what characterizes the ideal "real" candidate.

                              The hardest thing for most people to understand is that civil service hiring is very objective in nature and highly structured. It is not like getting a job with a private business.

                              For example, if I needed to fill a vacancy in a private company and an applicant happened along with a degree in business, I might hire them over a candidate that didn't have one. Living in Southern California, I might hire someone who speaks Spanish as a second language over someone who speaks French or who has no second language ability. I might hire someone who turns out to have the same hobbies as me rather than someone who does not. At the same time, if my daughter married a bum who couldn't hold a job, I might have to hire him over a competent worker, just to ensure that my child and grandchildren don't starve. In short, as long as I don't discriminate based on gender, race, age or sexual orientation, I can hire, or not hire someone for any reason, or for no reason, based solely on whim and not on merit.

                              Not so in civil service. To avoid creating a spoils system and resulting political corruption, most civil service is merit based. That means that the best qualified candidates is supposed to be hired first, the next best qualified is supposed to be hired second etc. In order to do this, public agencies develop testing processes to measure each candidate's ability to perform the job. The test must be job related, the same questions must be asked of everyone and all applicants must be graded according to the same standard. In other words, you can't ask a candidate you like how much 2+2 is and give him a passing score when he answers "4", while asking a candidate you don't like how many bubbles there are in a bar of soap and then failing him when he says he doesn't know.

                              To ensure fairness in the testing process, most exam announcements spell out what the minimum requirements are for the position, what you will be tested on and how your scores will be weighted. So if an applicant comes along with a Nobel Peace Prize, or was in the military, or speaks a second language, or has a really spiffy resume, or prior experience, or is young, or is older, it is all meaningless unless the exam announcement says an applicant will be graded on these things. With this in mind, the ideal candidate is someone who:

                              1. Meets the minimum qualifications for admission to the test. (pass/fail).
                              2. Meets the minimum medical qualifications for the position (pass/fail).
                              3. Meets the minimum psychological qualifications for the position (pass/fail).
                              4. Has nothing in the background that meets the criteria for disqualification (pass/fail).
                              5. Meets the minimum qualifications for the physical agility test (usually pass/fail).
                              6. Has the highest combined written and oral scores based on correctly answering the test questions, securing for themselves the highest position on the hiring list.

                              From there, you go down the hiring list until it is exhausted, or until you reach a cutoff point where you call for a new test. For example, I know of one agency that only hires people on the list whose combined written and oral scores are between 95% and 100%, When all those people are hired, they call for a new test rather than hire those with scores of 94% or less (and they wonder why they can't fill all of their vacancies).

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 158277 users online. 127 members and 158150 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on Today.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X