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When in doubt-Employer history question

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  • When in doubt-Employer history question

    Hi, quick question. In the background packet it asks me to list previous employers, and the reasons I left their respective employment. I left a previous employer(restaurant waiter) under poor circumstances, but the circumstances are such that I quit. However my employer may maintain that I was fired(and would probably add some nasty stuff to that as well). My question is, should I simply write that I was fired, and not chance anything? I don't want to say i quit and then have the employer contradict my statement.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ozzysmith12
    Hi, quick question. In the background packet it asks me to list previous employers, and the reasons I left their respective employment. I left a previous employer(restaurant waiter) under poor circumstances, but the circumstances are such that I quit. However my employer may maintain that I was fired(and would probably add some nasty stuff to that as well). My question is, should I simply write that I was fired, and not chance anything? I don't want to say i quit and then have the employer contradict my statement.
    Did you quit or get fired? If you told them you quit, you quit. If they said you're fired, well, you were fired. Neither is really a bad thing, but be honest as to what happened. They'll probably ask you later as to circumstances during an interview or the BI anyways.

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    • #3
      If you quit, say that you quit. If you were fired, say you were fired. Neither is probably going to be an issue as long as it was just a simple "I quit", or "You're fired" type deal. Omit it, lie about it, dance around it, and guess what? It becomes a big problem.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PhilipCal
        If you quit, say that you quit. If you were fired, say you were fired. Neither is probably going to be an issue as long as it was just a simple "I quit", or "You're fired" type deal. Omit it, lie about it, dance around it, and guess what? It becomes a big problem.


        Unfortunately, the situation was not simple. I had given notice that specific date was my last date of work. I then got into a fight with my manager right before my final shift was over, and she said don't come back here again. I don't know if she knew I already quit. She is in all probability the one to fill out any background forms and I feel she may say negative things regarding me, including that she fired me. So, I would rather not have to say what I feel is the truth(that I quit), and have a discrepancy between my version of events and hers. It would be much easier to simply say I got fired and deal with the fallout. But, I'm unsure as to what to write, and I've gotten different opinions.

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        • #5
          Put down you quit and then explain the rest of the circumstances. YOu should be alright if what your saying is all that happened.
          John 3:16

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          • #6
            I have personally been fired twice during a probationary period on both. I can say with absolute certainty that if they hadn't fired me I would have left sooner than later. The point is, you gotta put down what you remember and be prepared to explain whatever comes up... well, thats MY game plan anyway.

            Good Luck.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ozzysmith12
              Unfortunately, the situation was not simple. I had given notice that specific date was my last date of work. I then got into a fight with my manager right before my final shift was over, and she said don't come back here again. I don't know if she knew I already quit. She is in all probability the one to fill out any background forms and I feel she may say negative things regarding me, including that she fired me. So, I would rather not have to say what I feel is the truth(that I quit), and have a discrepancy between my version of events and hers. It would be much easier to simply say I got fired and deal with the fallout. But, I'm unsure as to what to write, and I've gotten different opinions.
              You put papers in that you quit. Unless it was the HR or person who actually deals with the paperwork that can say you were "fired", you'd probably be fine saying you quit. After all, if they check with HR/Personnel and your papers are there saying you quit, you should be kosher.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by aftermath
                You put papers in that you quit. Unless it was the HR or person who actually deals with the paperwork that can say you were "fired", you'd probably be fine saying you quit. After all, if they check with HR/Personnel and your papers are there saying you quit, you should be kosher.
                The restaurant had no HR department. It was a small place run by 3 managers, one of whom might say I was fired. They keep no written records that I know of. I gave oral notice to the manager. My whole problem is this manager does a lot of the work at the place, and would be likely to field any questions fill out forms regarding me.

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                • #9
                  Better to describe everything up front... at least you'll get a chance to explain. If you don't mention it and they find out what went down, you will be DQ'ed most likely.. just my $0.02.
                  "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils"

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                  • #10
                    Ozzy, I understand your concern for the facts. You'll be given the opportunity to fully explain what took place. Doesn't sound like the kiss of death to me, and you're not the first guy that ever quit or got fired.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PhilipCal
                      Ozzy, I understand your concern for the facts. You'll be given the opportunity to fully explain what took place. Doesn't sound like the kiss of death to me, and you're not the first guy that ever quit or got fired.

                      So, you think by the section for previous employer I should say I quit, and if they contradict me, I should explain the situation.

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                      • #12
                        How long ago was this?
                        "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils"

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JT in MD
                          How long ago was this?
                          Approximately 2 years ago.

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                          • #14
                            I would suggest you put down that you quit when filling out the application. Then, note in the reason for leaving "With explanation". Write down everything you've stated here on the last page of the appication or a blank page. Make sure you front load the application prior to the actual background beginning with any information that will require an explanation.

                            As a BI I would want to prove the discrepancy either way. If it was a small operation and they didn't maintain proper documentation, then I'd be hard pressed to pursue that employment check as anything of substance because they wouldn't be able to provide proof that you were terminated. Most companies of size won't allow themselves to hang out there liabilitywise without documentation to back up such a serious allegation that could lead to a former employee being blackballed based on what they said only. Most BI's wouldn't make too much of a termination from an employer who appears to simply have an axe to grind.

                            The bottomline is you say you quit and they may say you were fired. If your last two years of employment is fine and you don't have a history of employment issues, then I'd find it mildly interesting that an employer said they terminated you without proof.

                            A note to all candidates: Document all employment issues such as resignations, have your superviors sign the document, and get a copy for these types of potential issues.
                            Last edited by LA_Backgrounds; 04-18-2007, 09:44 PM.
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