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  • Asking your own questions throughout the interview?

    A couple articles I've come across while compiling preparatory material for my husband have suggested to make the interview (whether with just a single interviewer or a panel) more of a dialogue by interjecting pertinent and appropriately timed (i.e. not interrupting anyone, obviously) questions throughout the interview instead of waiting until the end when asked directly if you (the interviewee) have any questions.

    Is this a wise approach, or would it likely be perceived as too unorthodox and possibly rude?

    Thanks

  • #2
    I would say no.

    The purpose of the interview is to evaluate the applicant based on how they respond to a specific set of questions. The panel has an established procedure for doing that and is obliged to treat each applicant the same both in how they proceed and how the candidate is evaluated.

    Your approach disrupts the process and denies the panel the ability to evaluate the applicant according to their procedures. In addition, it suggests that if hired, the applicant is not the kind of person who will play be department rules, but is one who is likely to try and take charge and play by his own rules.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #3
      No. We don't want to hear anything we haven't asked about. This also pertains to business interviews.
      Now go home and get your shine box!

      Comment


      • #4
        What L-1 said. You would certainly disrupt the flow of our process; it would not be looked upon favorably.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by voicimonnom View Post
          A couple articles I've come across while compiling preparatory material for my husband have suggested to make the interview (whether with just a single interviewer or a panel) more of a dialogue by interjecting pertinent and appropriately timed (i.e. not interrupting anyone, obviously) questions throughout the interview instead of waiting until the end when asked directly if you (the interviewee) have any questions.

          Is this a wise approach, or would it likely be perceived as too unorthodox and possibly rude?

          Thanks
          I guarantee that will make an impression on the panel

          The only problem is it will not be a favorable impression
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            Noted. Thanks, everyone.

            Comment


            • #7
              This is what most orals are scored on. Prep him for questions on these areas:

              • Experience – assesses your ability and experience in accepting responsibilities and performing assigned tasks as demonstrated through achievements in work, school, and other activities.

              • Problem Solving – assesses your reasoning skills in developing timely, logical responses to a wide variety of situations and problems.

              • Communication Skills – assesses your oral communications skills, which includes speaking, listening, and non-verbal communication.

              • Interest/Motivation – addresses your interest in and preparedness for the peace officer job. It includes an assessment of your general level of interest, initiative, and goal orientation.

              • Interpersonal Skills – assesses many facets, such as social knowledge/appropriateness, social insight, empathy, social influence, social self-regulation, sociability, team orientation, social self-confidence, conflict management skills, and negotiating skills.

              • Community Involvement/Awareness – focuses specifically on your experiences and interest in community issues, as well as your interest in and ability to fill multiple roles and serve a diverse community.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                That's incredibly helpful, L-1, thank you.

                Follow-up question: he should just bring himself to any interview, yes? Some articles had suggested taking a portfolio with a few copies of his resume to distribute; but it seemed like a resume that far into the game might be kind of superfluous...?

                This whole process seems like such a delicate balancing act between respectful adherence to the etiquette/protocol that everyone should be following and finding ways to stand out from the field of candidates.

                Comment


                • #9
                  No resume unless asked for.

                  This is not a business interview. We don't want anything we don't ask for.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tracking, thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by voicimonnom View Post
                      That's incredibly helpful, L-1, thank you.

                      Follow-up question: he should just bring himself to any interview, yes? Some articles had suggested taking a portfolio with a few copies of his resume to distribute; but it seemed like a resume that far into the game might be kind of superfluous...?

                      This whole process seems like such a delicate balancing act between respectful adherence to the etiquette/protocol that everyone should be following and finding ways to stand out from the field of candidates.
                      An interview for a police position is not like an interview in the private sector.

                      Standing out is something that you either do or do not do. There really isn't a way to make a purse out of a sow's ear (Midwestern saying). Once you meet the minimum requirements for the job and get into the process the candidate needs to simply excel at every test, interview, examination and meeting in order to "stand out".


                      I have interviewed "stand out" people------on paper they looked EXCELLENT and I entered the session knowing that I was going to recommend hiring the person-----------then they opened their mouths.

                      On the other side I have interviewed what look to be a ---------"lets get this over" candidate who convinced us to hire him by his speaking skills.

                      All of those prep books and articles just don't take into account that the decisions are made by trained cops who tend to use training, experience and intuition to make the decisions to recommend hiring AND by a Chief/Sheriff who normally has a GROUP of excellent people from which to choose the final "lucky person" to hire

                      Bottom line is sometimes it is a coin toss.
                      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by voicimonnom View Post
                        A couple articles I've come across while compiling preparatory material for my husband have suggested to make the interview (whether with just a single interviewer or a panel) more of a dialogue by interjecting pertinent and appropriately timed (i.e. not interrupting anyone, obviously) questions throughout the interview instead of waiting until the end when asked directly if you (the interviewee) have any questions.

                        Is this a wise approach, or would it likely be perceived as too unorthodox and possibly rude?

                        Thanks



                        No!! I can't stress that point too strongly. There's a whole lot of warm and fuzzy Dr. Phil bull sh..t going around these days, and the material you posted is but one example. OK, that comment is NOT directed at you personally, but please don't allow your spouse to fall for it. Here's the deal.

                        The Oral Board will ask him questions. It's possible that some of the questions will be adversarial, even hostile. His job will be to answer those questions honestly, and without losing his composure. He will be graded on the veracity and sincerity of his replies. It is possible that at some point in the interview, usually at the conclusion, your husband will be asked if he has any questions.

                        Then, and only then, should he ask a question(s) pertinent to the interview.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nope. No resume, letters of reference, commendations, certificates, etc. There are many reasons for this.

                          First, under civil service all applicants have to be judged by the same evaluation criteria. The exam announcement for the position states exactly what everyone will be scored on. When you allow an applicant to submit something "extra" that is outside the stated evaluation process, you are giving them an advantage that calls the fairness and credibility of your testing and evaluation process into question.

                          Allowing an applicant to submit a resume when an established testing process is already in place permits the applicant rather than the employer to define the selection criteria. Once again it becomes a question as to who is running the show.

                          People include all sorts of life experience in their resumes. It is impractical for a civil service employer to try an identify the relevant value of every life experience to the position being sought and assign it a scoreable value for testing purposes.

                          Lastly, resume's are bull sh*t. There is no way to verify their claims and a carefully worded resume can mean anything or nothing. For example

                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Actual lol at the white board example.

                            And that makes sense re: the evaluation standards being as objective as possible.

                            I passed along the above advice (he sort of side-eyed me anyway when I mentioned the dialogue idea, so that wasn't even going to be a considered approach regardless apparently). Really appreciate all the input here.

                            Another follow-up question: since he's probably going to be facing rejection here eventually from some departments (just thinking that he'd be a total statistical anomaly if he didn't), how is this usually communicated? Is it typically via a generic e-mail, is someone he had actual contact with who ultimately yea-ed or nay-ed him going to let him know, or does it vary significantly across departments? Just wondering if he would have the opportunity to glean information about specifically why he didn't make the cut to see if there's anything he could do better or tweak for the next round (if it wasn't an automatic objective DQ like failing a test or something).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There are probably as many ways of notifying an applicant of his/her status as there are agencies. Some will send an E-Mail, others will use "snail mail", still others, a phone call. Seldom if ever will an agency give a reason why an applicant is either DQ'd or Non-Selected.(There is a vast difference between the two).

                              It's also very common for an applicant to spend anywhere from three to five years in more than one hiring process.

                              Comment

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