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  • Military Discharges Help

    If someone could help me it would be greatly appreciated. Back in 2003, I had rectal bleeding and wasn't sure what it was from. I went to the Doctor to try and figure out what was wrong with me and they performed a colonoscopy test which lead to no diagnostic findings. When I went to talk to a recruiter back in 2005 to join the Marines. I told my recruiter that I had this situation in 2003 and since my Doctor told me that there was no diagnostic findings that I was pretty much normal and that it wasn't a concern. So when I went to MCRD I wanted to try and get medicine because I developed having IBS and every time that I became nervous I would always need to use the restroom. I went to the Doctor when I was in basic and they have me medicine to calm my stomach down so it didn't act up. Since taking the medicine that was given to me had really helped and when I entered the 3rd phase I ran out of medicine and returned to the Doctor to try to get more medicine so I could get by basic training. The Doctor wanted to find out why my stomach was acting the way that it was. At the time my father was point of contact incase of emergencies so they contacted him to let him know that testing of colonoscopy was going to be given again. When my father was told this was going to be done, he brought up the testing that I got done in 2003 and that the doctor said that there was no diagnostic findings and that my recruiter knew about it. So since the test that was prior to the one in basic training I received an Entry Level Separation from the Marines with Uncharacterized being the Character of service with a separation code of JDA1 with the Reentry code being RE-3F and the narrative reasoning for this is Fraudulent Entry into the Military Service because of the test before. During a background investigation, this will obviously show up and because of my discharge would this hurt me because of the Fraud Entry label. Is there any way that I would get hired if I am able to explain my case. I would really appreciate it if someone could really help me. Thanks!

  • #2
    It varies from department to department, my department would allow you to explain the situation. You do have to keep in mind that anything associated with dishonesty will be highy scrutinized.

    Good luck in your endeavors.

    Comment


    • #3
      An entry level separation is uncharacterized, just as you mentioned.

      The "fraudulent enlistment" doesn't necessarily mean a crime was committed just that there was something incorrect and that the enlistment shouldn't have been enacted.

      All that said, there are several inconsistent points to your story. In particular the contacting of your father. The Corps shouldn't have contacted him unless there was an emergency. A colonoscopy isn't usually an emergency. Also, "my recruiter knew about it" doesn't cut the mustard. At MEPS they ask you straight out if there is anything medical or legal you've left out, if you've been told not to mention anything, etc, etc. If YOU didn't tell MEPS, then your enlistment WAS fraudulent and technically you committed a federal felony. Don't feel like the Lone Ranger, something like 10% of enlistments are terminated for "fraudulent enlistment" of one kind or other. How an agency will view it depends on the agency.

      Secondly, you really need to work on expressing yourself in writing. Peace officers do a LOT of paperwork, a LOT of writing and other people need to understand what's been written so they can work with teh information. Right now you're not the guy who's report I want to have to read.
      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
        An entry level separation is uncharacterized, just as you mentioned.

        The "fraudulent enlistment" doesn't necessarily mean a crime was committed just that there was something incorrect and that the enlistment shouldn't have been enacted.

        All that said, there are several inconsistent points to your story. In particular the contacting of your father. The Corps shouldn't have contacted him unless there was an emergency. A colonoscopy isn't usually an emergency. Also, "my recruiter knew about it" doesn't cut the mustard. At MEPS they ask you straight out if there is anything medical or legal you've left out, if you've been told not to mention anything, etc, etc. If YOU didn't tell MEPS, then your enlistment WAS fraudulent and technically you committed a federal felony. Don't feel like the Lone Ranger, something like 10% of enlistments are terminated for "fraudulent enlistment" of one kind or other. How an agency will view it depends on the agency.

        Secondly, you really need to work on expressing yourself in writing. Peace officers do a LOT of paperwork, a LOT of writing and other people need to understand what's been written so they can work with teh information. Right now you're not the guy who's report I want to have to read.
        Well sorry that my writing isn't too great. My first test that I received back from the hospital came back as no diagnostic findings. It was pretty normal. My recruiter did tell me that it wasn't a big deal since the Doctor said it was good to go. There was nothing to report to MEPS since my medical exam came back clear.

        Comment


        • #5
          This was 10 years ago so all of what happened at that time isn't fresh in my mind. I have a personal history questionnaire to fill out to send off to my background investigator so I am worried about being disqualified because of this and have a lot on my mind because of it.

          Comment


          • #6
            You are also going to have to worry about getting through the medical and psych. If you read http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Gastro.pdf you will see that IBS can be a disqualifier. While these are California's standards for law enforcement, the medical principles behind them do not stop at the state line and other states may have similar requirements.
            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by L-1 View Post
              You are also going to have to worry about getting through the medical and psych. If you read http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Gastro.pdf you will see that IBS can be a disqualifier. While these are California's standards for law enforcement, the medical principles behind them do not stop at the state line and other states may have similar requirements.
              Do you think if I explained and showed what happened regarding my DD214 that I would given a chance to proceed in the processing of getting hired with a police department?

              Comment


              • #8
                Well sorry that my writing isn't too great
                Don't apologize to me. It isn't going to keep ME from getting a job.

                There was nothing to report to MEPS since my medical exam came back clear.
                You went in for the test for a reason... and there WAS a problem, as you discovered.

                MEPS tells you to tell them EVERYTHING. You didn't.

                Had you mentioned the problem as you were required to do they MIGHT have saved you some trouble, even set you on a path to getting treatment and successfully enlisting at a later date. Instead you went thru weeks of boot to no purpose, a failed enlistment and potential problems in future employment.

                I spent almost as much time in the military as you have been alive. I know how the military works and I know how MEPS works. You didn't do what you were told to do, what you were supposed to do, and it bit you in the butt... as it usually does.

                IF you gain employment as a peace officer, keep this lesson in mind.
                "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Showtime0811 View Post
                  Do you think if I explained and showed what happened regarding my DD214 that I would given a chance to proceed in the processing of getting hired with a police department?
                  Your discharge status is a background matter. Backgrounds, medicals and psychs are traditionally not addressed until you successfully pass the written, oral and physical agility, and score high enough to be reachable.

                  If you get that far, then you will have to address this on three fronts.

                  1. Does the character of your discharge meet the standards for the position or is it grounds for DQ? None of us know what your agency's standards are, so only a representative of the department you are applying with can answer that.

                  2. Is the degree of your IBS a medical disqualifier with the agency you are applying with? None of us are physicians, none of us know the extent of your condition and none of are familiar with the medical standards of the agency you are applying with. Sorry, can't help you on that one.

                  3. IBS can be indicative if psychological issues. Are you free from any emotional or mental condition that might adversely affect your exercise of the powers of a police officer? Are you capable of withstanding the psychological demands of the position? None of us are physicians. None of us are familiar with your mental status. Can't help you here either. Like every other applicant, this will need to be determined through a series of written and in person psychological evaluations as administered by a licensed psychologist.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                    IBS can be indicative if psychological issues.
                    Good point:

                    every time that I became nervous I would always need to use the restroom.

                    Hmmmm...
                    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                      Don't apologize to me. It isn't going to keep ME from getting a job.



                      You went in for the test for a reason... and there WAS a problem, as you discovered.

                      MEPS tells you to tell them EVERYTHING. You didn't.

                      Had you mentioned the problem as you were required to do they MIGHT have saved you some trouble, even set you on a path to getting treatment and successfully enlisting at a later date. Instead you went thru weeks of boot to no purpose, a failed enlistment and potential problems in future employment.

                      I spent almost as much time in the military as you have been alive. I know how the military works and I know how MEPS works. You didn't do what you were told to do, what you were supposed to do, and it bit you in the butt... as it usually does.

                      IF you gain employment as a peace officer, keep this lesson in mind.
                      Would going to the Naval review board do any good with this situation? It would really suck if this would mess up my future forever given this was when I was younger.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Showtime0811 View Post
                        It would really suck if this would mess up my future forever given this was when I was younger.
                        Why , what does you being young have to do with it ? You were 18 and thus an adult by law.

                        Every action a person takes has consequences. Many time those consequences have ramifications that will follow that person throughout their lives. Those ramifications can be positive or negative depending on the action that triggered them.

                        It sounds like you omitted some information when you did your medical intake with the military. It doesn't matter if the military recruiter "told" you to do so or not----------------what matters is that YOU omitted some medical history and this later bit you in the arse when you got sick in training.

                        Yes, this very likely COULD prohibit you from serving as a peace officer, but if it does---------YOU are totally to blame for it do to YOUR actions. Own your actions.
                        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Mr. OP, here's what I suggest you do. Go back, and review in detail each reply which you've received. Pay particular attention to those replies given you by L-1. Although they come a California perspective, they have pretty broad application in terms of hiring standards nationwide. Stated another way, what applies in California will pretty well apply in Alabama, Iowa, etc.

                          While admitedly not medically qualified to answer your question, I would submit this to you. Your condition,could very possibly be as much of a problem for you in law enforcement as it was with the Marines.

                          IMHO, going to a Naval Medical Review isn't the solution to your problem. You'll need to try to move forward on the fronts my colleague L-1 has noted to you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
                            Why , what does you being young have to do with it ? You were 18 and thus an adult by law.

                            Every action a person takes has consequences. Many time those consequences have ramifications that will follow that person throughout their lives. Those ramifications can be positive or negative depending on the action that triggered them.

                            It sounds like you omitted some information when you did your medical intake with the military. It doesn't matter if the military recruiter "told" you to do so or not----------------what matters is that YOU omitted some medical history and this later bit you in the arse when you got sick in training.

                            Yes, this very likely COULD prohibit you from serving as a peace officer, but if it does---------YOU are totally to blame for it do to YOUR actions. Own your actions.
                            Do you think if I wrote a letter regarding what took place in the military would help me or hurt me? At the end of the background packet there is space to provide an detailed explanation regarding what took place.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Short answer : No, probably not. What we're attempting to convey to you is the very real possibility that your condition could be grounds to disqualify you for employment as a Police Officer. Left untreated, uncorrected, you still have a medical problem.

                              Keep in mind that any physician who examines you in connection with your prospective employment as a Police Officer, will do so in terms of agency medical standards and qualifications. If your condition in anyway compromises or detracts from your ability(s) to perform the duties of an Officer, these facts will be reported to the agency to which you apply.

                              Once more, I commend you to the replies of my colleagues. They have more than answered your questions.

                              Comment

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