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  • Including Citizen's Police Academy

    I currently completed the Miami-Dade Citizen's Police Academy which for those who are not aware of this program, it's quite similar to police explorers but for those that don't meet the age requirement of police explorers. My question is as follows, in my application should I put this under volunteering? Also, I was/are part of a honor society during college; should I include this and if so where should it be included. Thank you in advance and your help would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    If the application calls for that type of information, yes, mention it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Honor society would go under academic honors (unless it was a voluntary, non-merit based school association).

      I don't see attending a citizen's academy as volunteering, but your recruiter would be able to give you a much more specific answer for that department.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AppState View Post
        Honor society would go under academic honors (unless it was a voluntary, non-merit based school association).

        I don't see attending a citizen's academy as volunteering, but your recruiter would be able to give you a much more specific answer for that department.
        Thank you both.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sam, let me amplify my reply a little. If you're applying to a Civil Service agency, or one which bases it's hiring process on the Civil Service model, how you test is what will be critical. If you don't score sufficiently high on the written and oral phases of the process, all the volunteering and academic achievements will have been for naught.

          Should you compete in a Civil Service process, your score in the written exam will be critical. While 70% is generally considered "passing", a score in the mid to high nineties is virtually required to make you a competitive and reachable candidate. Your written exam score is often combined with an Oral Board score, and divided by two to arrive at a "weighted average". Once more, this score needs to be sufficiently high to make you competitive.

          Please understand that I'm not belittling your academic efforts, or your attendance at a citizen's academy. I am attempting to point out the absolute necessity of you testing well in each phase of the hiring process. Best of luck to you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
            Sam, let me amplify my reply a little. If you're applying to a Civil Service agency, or one which bases it's hiring process on the Civil Service model, how you test is what will be critical. If you don't score sufficiently high on the written and oral phases of the process, all the volunteering and academic achievements will have been for naught.

            Should you compete in a Civil Service process, your score in the written exam will be critical. While 70% is generally considered "passing", a score in the mid to high nineties is virtually required to make you a competitive and reachable candidate. Your written exam score is often combined with an Oral Board score, and divided by two to arrive at a "weighted average". Once more, this score needs to be sufficiently high to make you competitive.

            Please understand that I'm not belittling your academic efforts, or your attendance at a citizen's academy. I am attempting to point out the absolute necessity of you testing well in each phase of the hiring process. Best of luck to you.
            First off thank you for not sugar coating it, I understand and agree with your response. The only reason why I would include this information is because it couldn't hurt, correct? I have completed my F-BAT and successfully passed. My intention with the Citizen's Police Academy was not to only "stand out" from the crowd but to have a better understanding of police work and see it from another perspective rather than what we see on the big screen. I just hope a recruiter and the oral board can see what my intentions truly are and why I have decided to proceed with a career in Law Enforcement.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by samruiz View Post
              The only reason why I would include this information is because it couldn't hurt, correct? I have completed my F-BAT and successfully passed. My intention with the Citizen's Police Academy was not to only "stand out" from the crowd but to have a better understanding of police work and see it from another perspective rather than what we see on the big screen. I just hope a recruiter and the oral board can see what my intentions truly are and why I have decided to proceed with a career in Law Enforcement.
              Let’s try this another way.

              The testing process is intended to measure and score you actual ability to perform the duties of the job you are seeking. We all have many life experiences but they don’t necessarily bring a significant amount of meaningful skills to the table that are relevant to the job you want.

              Has your membership in the honors society or attended the citizen’s police academy significantly enhanced your knowledge or criminal law, search and seizure or evidence? Has it taught you the rules on use of force, how to perform the PIT maneuver, combat shooting, high speed pursuit driving, testifying in court, CPR, first aid, traffic accident investigation, narcotics identification, dealing with emotionally disturbed persons, rules governing the operation of government.

              I don’t mean to belittle your achievements, but in the grand scheme of things they do not make you stand out – they are just a pimple.

              As PhilipCal said, you will take a written exam. Your score there will be based on the number of correct answers you give to test questions and nothing in your personal history will help you here.

              You may also take an oral exam. In most instances the oral will score you on the following:

              • Experience – assesses your ability and experience in accepting responsibilities and performing assigned tasks as demonstrated through achievements in work, school, and other activities.

              • Problem Solving – assesses your reasoning skills in developing timely, logical responses to a wide variety of situations and problems.

              • Communication Skills – assesses your oral communications skills, which includes speaking, listening, and non-verbal communication.

              • Interest/Motivation – addresses your interest in and preparedness for the peace officer job. It includes an assessment of your general level of interest, initiative, and goal orientation.

              • Interpersonal Skills – assesses many facets, such as social knowledge/appropriateness, social insight, empathy, social influence, social self-regulation, sociability, team orientation, social self-confidence, conflict management skills, and negotiating skills.

              • Community Involvement/Awareness – focuses specifically on your experiences and interest in community issues, as well as your interest in and ability to fill multiple roles and serve a diverse community.

              At best, your honors society and citizens police academy may score you a fraction of a point on the oral.

              Your written and oral scores will be combined and applicants are hired in the order of their total scores (highest first, next highest second, etc.)

              You can list the honors society and citizens police academy (I would), but don't misunderstand - they are just fluff. Don't count on them putting you over the top.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                Let’s try this another way.

                The testing process is intended to measure and score you actual ability to perform the duties of the job you are seeking. We all have many life experiences but they don’t necessarily bring a significant amount of meaningful skills to the table that are relevant to the job you want.

                Has your membership in the honors society or attended the citizen’s police academy significantly enhanced your knowledge or criminal law, search and seizure or evidence? Has it taught you the rules on use of force, how to perform the PIT maneuver, combat shooting, high speed pursuit driving, testifying in court, CPR, first aid, traffic accident investigation, narcotics identification, dealing with emotionally disturbed persons, rules governing the operation of government.

                I don’t mean to belittle your achievements, but in the grand scheme of things they do not make you stand out – they are just a pimple.

                As PhilipCal said, you will take a written exam. Your score there will be based on the number of correct answers you give to test questions and nothing in your personal history will help you here.

                You may also take an oral exam. In most instances the oral will score you on the following:

                •Experience – assesses your ability and experience in accepting responsibilities and performing assigned tasks as demonstrated through achievements in work, school, and other activities.

                •Problem Solving – assesses your reasoning skills in developing timely, logical responses to a wide variety of situations and problems.

                •Communication Skills – assesses your oral communications skills, which includes speaking, listening, and non-verbal communication.

                •Interest/Motivation – addresses your interest in and preparedness for the peace officer job. It includes an assessment of your general level of interest, initiative, and goal orientation.

                •Interpersonal Skills – assesses many facets, such as social knowledge/appropriateness, social insight, empathy, social influence, social self-regulation, sociability, team orientation, social self-confidence, conflict management skills, and negotiating skills.

                •Community Involvement/Awareness – focuses specifically on your experiences and interest in community issues, as well as your interest in and ability to fill multiple roles and serve a diverse community.

                At best, your honors society and citizens police academy may score you a fraction of a point on the oral.

                Your written and oral scores will be combined and applicants are hired in the order of their total scores (highest first, next highest second, etc.)

                You can list the honors society and citizens police academy (I would), but don't misunderstand - they are just fluff. Don't count on them putting you over the top.
                Thank you for the heads up and please don't get me wrong I wouldn't expect to be put on top of the list because of this.

                Comment

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